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Thread: Sheep hunting...alone?

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    Default Sheep hunting...alone?

    After reading some posts about sheep shape and pack frame,sounds like the majority hunts alone.
    How heavy is your load for a 7 day trip?Basic food,one pot and pan,a tarp and a sleeping bag?
    Or do you expect your partner to be as good of a shape as you are?
    I more likely going to hunting alone,by choice.It's a tough call.Last time my girl friend was packing 60lbs,the dog 40 and for me 90lbs.(38inchs horns).A beautifull,classic sheep hunt.
    What is your choice?

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    A ram, a girlfriend, and a good dog....well I suspect your not gonna get much argument about the beauty of that. Sounds like you were in great company.

    I think we would be arguing to the wrong person about the merits of a solo hunt.

    To answer your question....even solo, the exit is right about where you were 90-100 pounds with a big ram. You'll notice the heavy emphasis on quality light gear being talked about endlessly on here.

    We all enjoy a picture of quality rams. I'd like to see your dogs pack too. You don't have to show pictures of your girlfiend though.
    If you packed a camera?

    Me, I've got a Spot, Vhf, and Iphone. I know! I'm not a "classic" hunter. Google earth and GPS are some of my tools.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I have hunted sheep alone a number of times and I don't mind it. But I really don't think the majority here does. Lots more fun and safe with somebody else along....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    Although solo sheep is something I've done and REALLY enjoyed, I generally try to take a partner when I can. Mountain hunting is risky enough as is, and I've got a wife and two young kids that can't afford for me not to come back. I do love it though, and will do it again when I can.

    As far a pack weights, my gear pile for solo trips runs +/- 55 lbs depending on how much food and water I bring. That INCLUDES rifle and optics. Base pack weight (minus water, food, rifle, binoculars) is +/- 33 lbs. I could be lighter, but am carrying a 5 lb tent and 4+ lb spotting scope. Base weight in the high 20's is doable with some sacrifice.

    Coming out solo with a ram in a single trip will run 110+. On bad ground it can be a dicey proposition.

    Yk

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    I've hunted alone and I don't really prefer it for the most part. It can be rewarding but risky. My last packweight on a sheep hunt was 62lbs going in. Would've had to make two trips on the way out if I'd been successful (which I wasn't).

    Sheep hunting needs a partner...preferably one who can convince you that those 7/8ths are really 7/8ths....
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member lab man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    Sheep hunting needs a partner...preferably one who can convince you that those 7/8ths are really 7/8ths....
    Ha, I'll second that!

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    This is one we have hashed out a few times here. I have gone in alone and that is also the only trip I got sick on. Miserable sick... ran out or water while sick and eventually got myself together enough to stumble down the mountain and out about 10 miles where I called my wife to pick me up. I went back a couple days later with a buddy and though I didn't get a sheep my buddy did score a nice black bear the last day of the hunt as a consolation prize. I would go alone again before I would sit out a season or waste a draw tag but I would definitely skip going in opening weekend if I had a chance to go later with a partner. It sure would have saved my hunt to have a buddy who could have fetched water or helped to make some food. I also take a bigger tent when going w/ a partner since we can split weight and NOT being in a little solo tent would have been a blessing to. Sure sucked sweating out and being stuck laying on my sleeping bag since it was raining outside knowing that there wasn't any chance of not freezing my can off over night.

    All that said there is certainly worse things that can go wrong and in the grand scheme I was back to 100% couple days later. Here is a story from the AOD archives that ended with substantially more finality.

    http://outdoorsdirectory.com/magazin...eep_hunter.htm

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by borealbushman View Post
    After reading some posts about sheep shape and pack frame,sounds like the majority hunts alone.
    How heavy is your load for a 7 day trip?Basic food,one pot and pan,a tarp and a sleeping bag?
    Or do you expect your partner to be as good of a shape as you are?
    I more likely going to hunting alone,by choice.It's a tough call.Last time my girl friend was packing 60lbs,the dog 40 and for me 90lbs.(38inchs horns).A beautifull,classic sheep hunt.
    What is your choice?
    Just understand that there is absolutely nothing wrong with sheep hunting solo. BUT......things "can" and "do" go bad real quick. And I mean REAL quick. If somebody is with you it can make the difference.

    I have to think back when I killed my first ram. I was caping him up on a pretty steep hillside....which you end up doing a lot. There is only so much time you can spend bending over, so I went to sit down to rest my back and placed my hand, the one with the caping knife in it, down on the ground and went to sit. Because we were on such a steep hillside, even though you are sitting down you are still sitting almost vertically standing up. When I went to sit, the side of my right thigh came down right on top of the pointy little tip of the caping knife. I was ok, just a pretty good puncture wound, that got pretty sore. But I have often wondered what would have happened had I hit a major vein or something and not had any help? Having somebody else with, in that case, could have made a huge difference.

    When going alone you just have to be THAT much more careful with almost every move you make.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    I have had 1 successive solo sheep hunt and the only reason was I couldn't find some one to tag along with me on a drawing hunt.Had a way over loaded pack and took a fall bending my ankle sideways.It could have been much worse further back in but I was close enough it took everything I had to make it to the truck.Was my most memorable hunt for sure but could have also been worse.Just pick your steps wisely and take extra precaution to everything else.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Did it Done it multiple times, packed in about 40- 47 pounds (week supply of food), packed out well over a hundred pounds including horns and Hide, This last year I left all four quarters on the bone, due to the location aticipating getting stuck and keeping the meat longer. did it the whole way hunched over and it killed my back. However, each year my pack gets lighter and lighter with updated new line of gear. The lonliness factor sets in but, I kinda like it. Sat phone helps convincing the wife into allowing me to do it.

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    Dude, these guys packing in under 50 pounds are crackerjacks with top notch gear. Expect to carry 50 plus in, eat a bunch of weight and burn a bunch of fuel then pack out 140 pounds. I realized last year as I checked in 162 pounds of caribou meat that I have been under estimating my pack weight. For instance, my pack alone weighs 10 pounds! I have checked in 80 pounds of sheep meat before which doesnt account for horns or cape. The solo hunter has a mammoth pack out ahead of him but it's part of the challenge. And it's nothing compared to packing out a moose...
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

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    It was a home made pack using poly duck fabric.It doen't matter what it's made of,it gets thrashed rather quickly.
    Otis was a 85lbs husky and when we left with full loads,I had to help him get on his hind legs with what I guessed to be 40lbs of meat.
    We were lucky to find some ice near by to store the meat for a day or so then we hiked out in 10 hours .Brutal.
    Otis is no more.I went back with an other dog but that didn't work out so well,at first.
    Like mentioned earlier,it's good to have someone else to convice you that it's a 7/8 curl.So true.
    I might change my mind about going alone this fall.





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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by borealbushman View Post

    Holy smokes did you get that ram in some mild terrain.....!!! At least that's what it looks like anyway. Sometimes a guy can get lucky I guess. And he looks like a beauty...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Right on! Good looking dog.

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    It's looking like my buddy is going to bail (he caught the fiance disease). Any more tips would be appreciated! I'm planning on 7 days. Estimated pack weight right now is 53 but it will probably grow to 55 as little last minute junk gets added.

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    Member Silvertip-CO's Avatar
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    I'd do it alone even if it killed me. What a fine way to go.
    svenska50@hotmail.com

    NRA LIFE MEMBER

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    There are lots of places on rivers with sheer cliffs where sheep and goats congregate. You can just float by and shoot them from a boat, and when they fall in the water you dive in and wrap a rope around their head before they sink.

    Cabelas sells a roll up game sled that you can drag, or if you take a dog, let the dog drag it. People make a big deal out of sheep and goat hunting. In my opinion they are pretty easy, the people that make a big deal out of it are the ones that go out of their way in some inaccessible place and try to pack out a 200 pound animal in the mountains.

    there is a valley on the Kenai Pen. where there are sheep and goats virtually side by side, not far from a town. and they are so used to the sound of rocks breaking off the mountainside and crashing and cracking that you can take multiple shots at them.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Yet the way we kill animals still matters. I'm a sport hunter when I'm climbing mountains and chasing white animals.

    I'm not looking for the easiest hunt when I choose to got solo. I'm not really looking for the hardest either. I'm just looking to hunt!

    What happens out in the woods is between me and the game. I live in Alaska and love our wide open spaces and the sense of individuality that can be found in the wilderness.

    Do a solo hunt you'll know when you done if being a hunter is really for you.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sollybug View Post
    Dude, these guys packing in under 50 pounds are crackerjacks with top notch gear. Expect to carry 50 plus in, eat a bunch of weight and burn a bunch of fuel then pack out 140 pounds. I realized last year as I checked in 162 pounds of caribou meat that I have been under estimating my pack weight. For instance, my pack alone weighs 10 pounds! I have checked in 80 pounds of sheep meat before which doesnt account for horns or cape. The solo hunter has a mammoth pack out ahead of him but it's part of the challenge. And it's nothing compared to packing out a moose...
    what on earth brand of backpack do you have that can carry 162 pounds? are you 7 feet tall and built like Arnold Schwarzenegger in his prime growth-hormone overdosing Mr. Olympia winning days?

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    borealbushman thanks for posting the pics and talking about your hunt, sounds like you all had a great trip. The weights you posted if they were after you added your ram then they sound on par with what most of us are packing out.

    On my last sheep hunt my partner and I packed out approx 210 lbs between the two of us, this included all of our camp, one ram(boned out meat, cape, horns and skull), black bear hide and skull, plus our rifles. Going in our packs started out at approx 55lbs each for a 7 day hunt.

    If solo you better plan on two trips or eating a lot of sheep meat before heading out.

    I agree with Sollybug, most guys and gals starting a hunt with less than 50lbs have spent some money on lightweight gear, made a few trips into the mountains prior, and have left a lot of stuff at home that most people normally take.

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