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Thread: Clipper Mackenzie vs Esquif Cargo

  1. #1
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    Default Clipper Mackenzie vs Esquif Cargo

    Went downtown today to our Whitehorse Canoe stores. Have a Scott Hudson Bay that is a bit too big for some trips I'd like to do that require a portage. Looked at these two boats. Impressions

    Esquif Cargo 17 foot:

    Love the seats....
    Heavy but not super stiff
    Looks well suited for a small motor but a compromised paddler
    Just big enough

    Clipper Mackenzie Sport 18 foot

    As heavy as the Cargo, but very stiff. The Kevlar version shaves 16 pounds and is easier to shoulder
    Good for both motor and paddle...It's basically the 20 foot Mackenzie with 2 feet cut off
    Looks a lot bigger and gives a bit more confidence to safely carry two paddlers, gear and a moose.

    Anybody compare both boats on the water?

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Boudarc would be the guy to talk to about that, as he has both. The epoxy paint is more abrasion resistant than the gel coat on polyester resin/chopped strand boats. It's STIFF. One tough boat.

    The Esquif is better though IMO for shallow water abuse. Both boats felt identical, performance wise. I think Clipper makes amazing canoes, and the 18 Mac, is something to be proud of.

  3. #3

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    IMO - Mac 18 is stiffer and doesn't oil can. It's noticeably lighter weight, paddles easier, handles better with motor and seems more stable. The Esquif is the only choice between the two if you want a surface drive and plan to run the riffles at full speed or plan to regularly drag over rocks. It "does" oil can. The Mac 18 can be restored back to new with a little epoxy paint if necessary. I believe the Mac 18 will haul a heavier load in deep water.

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    Thanks great info! ...seeing as I am a bit short of money I'll likely rent the Esquif from the rental fleet when I need it and get some experience before spending heavy cash. I also looked at the Scott Makobe and it's built like a russian tank...with the all the elegance of a bull-dozer but strong as hell. I like the Mac but it looks awful pretty to scratch up! The Esquif might be the best beat em up boat.
    No soul in Royalex which is good in a rough and tumble freighter.


    Still thinking about a copperhead for the big Scott too. Taking the 1975 Rokon with me would allow me to drag the big Scott through the portage trail. So many toys so little money!

  5. #5
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    Very easy to stiffen-up the Esquif... Better transom for a surface drive... The Clipper is a nice looking canoe though....you would probably want to keep it that way....

  6. #6
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    Very easy to stiffen-up the Esquif... Better transom for a surface drive... The Clipper is a nice looking canoe though....you would probably want to keep it that way....
    Yes, I'm going to do that to mine. After testing various batches of epoxy, I have one particular batch that is the most flexible of any I've ever tested. I may use this in combo with a heavy piece of kevelar. I still want some flex, but about 50 percent less.

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