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Thread: Modern Tyranno Thumper

  1. #1
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Default Modern Tyranno Thumper

    Hi All,

    After reading today's news about T-Rex and how they are related to chickens.

    "When Schweitzer's colleagues at Harvard Medical School analyzed the seven dinosaur proteins, they found that it most closely matches that in modern chickens. " - Voice of America

    I should trade in my Big Bore for the ole .22 LR as my Dinosaur weapon of Choice.... : )

    Ron

    PS- I wonder if hitting a chicken with a .577 would be nothing but a puff of feathers. LOL

  2. #2

    Default

    Ron,

    I can definitely help you with this one as it may qualify as my first "big game" kill. My grandparents sold eggs and when they went on vacation it was my job to take care of the little dinos. They had some young rooster t-rexes and one of them got real territorial and would ambush me everytime I fed and watered the flock. I got really tired of getting flopped and spurred twice a day. When my grandparents got back I begged to shoot that rooster, err dinosaur. My grandmother was all for killing and eating him but she wanted to do it the old fashioned way. I would take a corn-cutter (that's machette to you non midwestern rural types) and chop his head off and hold on so he would bleed out without bruising the meat. Having been started on this routine at about age 4 I was bored with it, and having just read the adventures of John Hunter I was fantasizing this pest as rouge elephant. If only I had known that he was a dinosaur it would have been a much better fantasy.

    After much begging, I finally prevailed with the caveat that it had to be a head shot, and I would immediately grab him, cut his head off and bleed him out. (If I'd known he was a dinosaur I'd have clubbed him with a baseball bat caveman style.) After careful scouting and a successful stalk to the smokehouse (my blind) I ambushed the killer t-rex rooster and dispatched him with a maximum pressure load from my Crossman .22 pellet gun. My first big game dino kill. Do you think this would work on BB? I've seen the posts about the .17HMR and this was a dinosaur.

  3. #3
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    Default t-rex-rooster

    My first big game harvest was a rogue rooster. I was probably 14, maybe 15, and I raised bantam chickens - free ranging of course. I had a special blood line - very colorful and small.

    Well one of my well meaning aunts gave me some of those colored chicks for easter. One survived to nearly adult. The die wore off of course, and that big bruiser was white. I mean no color except for his yellow beak and legs, and pink comb. I just let him hang out with the bantams, but he was huge, and kept growing. He was a novelty, but finally, even at my young age, I realized that he was going to ruin my bantam gene pool.

    Then I began discovering some of my young half-grown chickens dead. After a while I saw the big boy pecking one of the youngsters in the head, and realized he was actually killing them off - one by one.

    I didn't ask permission. I went in the house, got the old single shot twenty guage, loaded it with bird shot, and got to about ten feet of the rascal, and blew his head off.

    He bled out quite nicely, and we had chicken in various way, for several meals. The gene pool was intact, and I enjoyed those bantams until I went off to college.

    KB

  4. #4

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    Kabluewy,

    Perhaps we could get together and start a high fence operation (can't have these prehistoric monsters escaping and terrorizing children and the faint of heart). Genuine dinosaur hunting. We could probably get some set pieces from some of the old roadside attractions featuring the word "prehistoric" really cheap. The whole thing could be set up in 80 acres. You, of course, would be in charge of the breeding program. Not being recognized as game animals we would pretty much be free of state regulation, and liability insurance would probably be pretty reasonable. The real fun for us would be hunting the predators outside the fence.

    I was about the same age as you when I dispatched the dinosaur in my post.

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    Default .577 chicken

    Quote Originally Posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
    Hi All,

    After reading today's news about T-Rex and how they are related to chickens.

    "When Schweitzer's colleagues at Harvard Medical School analyzed the seven dinosaur proteins, they found that it most closely matches that in modern chickens. " - Voice of America

    I should trade in my Big Bore for the ole .22 LR as my Dinosaur weapon of Choice.... : )

    Ron

    PS- I wonder if hitting a chicken with a .577 would be nothing but a puff of feathers. LOL
    I don't know.

    I do know that it would more than double the price of the chicken though.

    lol

    jedi

  6. #6

    Default Gallus gallus domesticus

    CHICKEN From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The first pictures of chickens in Europe are found on Corinthian pottery of the 7th century BC. The poet Cratinus (mid-5th century BC, according to the later Greek author Athenaeus) calls the chicken "the Persian alarm". In Aristophanes's comedy The Birds (414 BC) a chicken is called "the Median bird", which points to an introduction from the East. Pictures of chickens are found on Greek red figure and black-figure pottery.
    In ancient Greece, chickens were still rare and were a rather prestigious food for symposia. Delos seems to have been a centre of chicken breeding.
    An early domestication of chickens in Southeast Asia is probable, since the word for domestic chicken (*manuk) is part of the reconstructed Proto-Austronesian language (see Austronesian languages). Chickens, together with dogs and pigs, were the domestic animals of the Lapita culture, the first Neolithic culture of Oceania.
    Chickens were spread by Polynesian seafarers and reached Easter Island in the 12th century AD, where they were the only domestic animal, with the possible exception of the Polynesian Rat (Rattus exulans). They were housed in extremely solid chicken coops built from stone. Traveling as cargo on trading boats, they reached the Asian continent via the islands of Indonesia and from there spread west to Europe and western Asia.

    All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License.

  7. #7

    Default Gallus gallus (Red Junglefowl)

    Additional information on the Red Junglefowl (descendent of the T-Rex).

    http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.ed...us_gallus.html

  8. #8
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    Default Red Jungle Chickens

    That link is very interesting and the other reference too. Once I bought a video from PBS about the natural history of chickens, and I was very disappointed. It was mostly emotional animal lover stuff, and had little to do with the actual natural history of chickens, which is really quite interesting, and its parallel to human history. Perhaps even more interesting now with the claimed connection with dinosaurs.

    The picture shown of the jungle chicken reminds me of the colorful bantams I had, but their color was not always so red. However, some of the roosters were every bit as colorful as the picture shown. Since they were free ranging, their behavior was very similar to that described in the link. The roosters seemed to be fighting always for dominance, and sometimes one died from fighting. As they got older, the spurs got longer. These were not the sport fighting chickens that I've heard about. I have no knowledge or experience with that. These chickens I had were rather small. I called them bantams, but they probably were not true bantams, but they were not ordinary barnyard chickens either. That big white was an abomination, and he never did get the social order thing.

    I didn't have to feed them, but did so anyway, to remind them where home was. They could take care of themselves forging, and they roosted in the trees like wild turkeys. Sometimes an owl would get one. They could fly up to a limb 20 feet or more off the ground, then work their way up to their favorite spot. The roosters generally had no comb because it would freeze off in the winter - turn black from frost bite, and just fall off. Those **** roosters sometimes crowed in the middle of the night, not just a sunrise, but one can become accustomed to it.

    They nested in the thickets and hedge rows just like a quail. The hen would disappear, and when seen she acted odd, then later would show up with a bunch of chicks. I would usually catch them all, and the hen, and keep them penned up until about half grown, or until they were big enough to have a chance to escape dogs, and learn to fly. The adults would just fly away like a pheasant.

    As I said, it was a special gene pool, and may be difficult to find today. It may be lost. I got my first ones from a farm, way back in the sticks, where the old man had passed away. The chickens were living there several months after, and his relatives said I could have them if I could catch them. Mostly I caught them at night, using a flashlight, and a long board, with a perch on one end. We would blind each one by holding the flash light in its face, gently push the perch up under its breast until it stepped onto it, then gently lower it down, keeping the light in it eyes, until a third person would grab it from underneath. It took a while, but eventually I caught them all, in various ways, and took them to their new home. I caught some with a trap made like the ones I saw some poachers used to catch quail - only bigger.

    Once, I saw a bunch of hens gathered in a circle, all looking at something in the middle, and they were making peeping sounds. Carefully I walked over so not to disturb them, and saw they had surrounded a rattle snake, who was very interested in leaving. I mention that because I thought it was interesting, and I remember it well, and I never suspected chickens would act that way.

    I always thought that those who never experienced a flock of free ranging, yet domestic chickens somehow missed out on something special. There were many things special about growing up on a farm, including learning to appreciate the outdoors, and hunting, and fishing.

    KB

  9. #9

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    Kabluewy,

    When I was a kid we had the layers, the eaters, and the pets. The bantams were my favorites. They layed kid size eggs, and the fiesty little roosters seemed to know who their friends were. My grandfather occassionally hit a pheasant nest when mowing hay and if the eggs were intact he would put them under a bantam hen to hatch out. Those little pheasants would run a hen ragged. I had my own special chickens that hatched in my hand and imprinted on me. My grandparent's chicken yard was a fenced in orchard and the chickens provided organic pest control. The pullets would roost in the trees and when it came time to butcher the old hens (even leghorns make great soup and sandwich meat) and move the young chickens into the main coup we would use chicken hooks, a long stiff wire bent to hook over a chickens leg, and flashlights to catch them. We would clip their wings and lock them up for a couple of days, and then, for the most part, they would roost in the chicken coup rather than the trees. This may sound strange, but my grandfather encouraged skunks to den up under the chicken coup. It seems that they left the chickens alone, but if you had a family of skunks you didn't have rats, possums, raccoons or weasles. The rats were the worst because of all the feed they would eat. Weasles were next on line because they killed indiscriminately. But that only happened one time and it was a small one that succumed to a large territorial cat. I can think of few domestic animals that can teach as much to kids as chickens.

    A side note. I grew up about 80 miles from Attica, OH. We have year round eggs and chicken because of a couple of things that transpired there. It was discovered that if one left a light on in the chicken coup they would lay year round. The second major development was the mechanical hen or incubator. Prior to these developments chicken was, in cities, a premium, seasonal, and expensive meat. Eggs were only available about half the year.

    William Tecumseh Sherman, when stationed along the Columbia River, in the 1850's struck upon a plan to raise chickens and them ship them down to San Francisco. If the plan had worked, he would have made several years pay in a few months. Unfortunately, all of his chickens died onboard the ship they were on. It seems that just outside the bay the wind died and the temperatures soared. The crated chickens, just as they do today during severe heat waves, died.

  10. #10
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    Default Wow

    This is one of the funniest threads I've seen and very informative. Flyer, your first one reminded me of Pat Macmanus.
    And yes, at least double the price for that chicken. Reminds me of some spruce grouse....
    Thanks for the morning laugh.

  11. #11

    Default Wild Cows

    Since this is leaning toward a Patrick F. McManus topic, wanted to ask if anyone has ever hunted the "Wild Cows" of the Aleutian Islands? Now I think that would be one heck of a big game hunting story. And to nudge the thread back to a shooting topic: What would be the best caliber and rifle combination for hunting "Wild/Feral Cows" here in Alaska ?

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WDChurchJr View Post
    Since this is leaning toward a Patrick F. McManus topic, wanted to ask if anyone has ever hunted the "Wild Cows" of the Aleutian Islands? Now I think that would be one heck of a big game hunting story. And to nudge the thread back to a shooting topic: What would be the best caliber and rifle combination for hunting "Wild/Feral Cows" here in Alaska ?
    Found a link on the Alaska Outdoors Directory Hunting forum about hunting Wild Cows in the Aleutians: (Interesting reading)

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/akf...ting/37433.htm

  13. #13

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    BTK

    Thanks. Pat, Retch, and Rancid are some of my favorite characters. WD, bulls are just plain dangerous whether they are free range or corralled. There are lots of permanently dead or disabled farmers who got too lax around bulls they had raised from calves. A few years ago a guy that lives about ten miles from me was halter training his bull for a show and the bull took exception to correction. The guy is now in a wheel chair. A guy that let me hunt his property had a neighbor that would pasture his cows where the bull could smell them when they were in season, and then after they were bred he would complain about the bull breaking down his fence. My farmer friend tried putting the bull in the barn when he saw cows in that pasture, but the bull leaned against the walls and pushed the siding off. He finally cured the bull of this by pounding nails into the barn walls. My dad and his brother had dairy cattle and one time a bull was working a gate. Dad went to go out of the milking parlor to settle the bull down and did a 180 on the step down. No it wasn't the bull, but a skunk that he was about to step on. He he always laughed about how a 4 pound varmint scared him more than a ton of Holstein bull that could have killed him. It would be interesting to hunt feral cattle that have adapted to their environment. I imagine it would be like hunting any of the other large bovines.

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