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Thread: Painting my 19ft Grumman

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    Default Painting my 19ft Grumman

    Somewhere on here I read a thread about painting aluminum. I cannot find the thing for the life of me. I am especially interested in the thread because I thought I saw something about a paint that would make the bottom of the canoe "less sticky." Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks

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    I think this is it.... http://www.glazecoat.com/Coat%20it.htm I think I'm gonna do do my 19 footer too...jb

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    Stuff looks interesting, wiil cost a ton of money to ship to Alaska though....Hazmat and UPS air

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    I would use a zink/chromate primer (I thinks that's what it was called.) so the paint will stay on aluminum. I remember it from my Navy days. It was a yellow primer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    I would use a zink/chromate primer (I thinks that's what it was called.) so the paint will stay on aluminum. I remember it from my Navy days. It was a yellow primer.
    I have used self etching primer by Rust-O-Lium successfully. I've even used it on my plane. Don't use it inside since it has an acid in it etch the surface of the alum.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    you definitely have to sandblast or sand, then use a primer, then paint. If you just start spraying paint on it, you will regret it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boud'arc View Post
    I would use a zink/chromate primer (I thinks that's what it was called.) so the paint will stay on aluminum. I remember it from my Navy days. It was a yellow primer.
    If it was yellow, it probably wasn't zinc chromate; Zinc chromate is typically green (any that I've ever seen anyway). Tempo Aviation makes a good zinc chromate rattle can product, and somebody (I forget who) makes a 2 part that you can put into a paint sprayer. The yellow stuff you are referring to is probably self etching primer that has an acid in it. You apply it to the cleaned and bare aluminum, and it etches the surfaces and then bonds to it. It's almost like an epoxy in terms of viscosity and it's ability to fill minor blemishes. I've used both on commercial and military aircraft. The yellow, self etching stuff is the more durable product, but it's more difficult to use. The green stuff (zinc chromate) is probably more than adequate for a canoe, especially if one preps the metal properly before hand.

    Quote Originally Posted by theunseenowl View Post
    you definitely have to sandblast or sand, then use a primer, then paint. If you just start spraying paint on it, you will regret it.
    A note on surface prep when dealing with aluminum. If you are going to use a bead blaster/sand blaster, you must be cautious about the type of media you are going to use. Sand is very coarse and will actually damage the aluminum, making it pock-marked and looking as thought it just came through a hail storm (sand storm?) Aluminum is not the same as auto body work. Worse than that, aggressive sanding/prepping or use of abrasive media on aluminum will strip the corrosion resistant coating found on most aluminum. It takes very little effort to strip away that coating; it's only a few millimeters thick. (It's acutally a very smal percentage of the total thickness of the material, so the thicker aluminums have thicker coatings, but the thickest are still quite thin.) If your canoe "shines" after you sand/prep it, you've removed the corrosion preventative coating.

    A better alternative to all of that sanding/blasting is to use Aluma Prep 33 and Alodine 1301. You buy it in one gallon bottles (Local aircraft supply places may sell it in smaller quantities; 1 qt of each did my entire 19' Michicraft) and dilute it with distilled water according tot he instructions. Spray on the Aluma Prep using a windex type sprayer, let it set 10-15 mins (or whatever the instructions say) and wash it off with a water hose. Same thing with the Alodine. The Prep is just that, a prep agent that etches the already cleaned and bare aluminum and gets it ready to accept the Alodine. The Alodine is a corrosion preventative very similar to anodizing. (In fact, alodine is oft referred to as "field anodization.") Once your're done with the alodine, you let it dry, then pain with your favorite paint. The one thing that Aluma Prep and Alodine don't do is fill scratches and blemishes. If you want a perfectly smooth surface once you're done, you may try some sort of sandable primer or bondo type filling agent, but I have no idea how that will interact with the Alodine.

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    sound like a do able thing on coating your 19 FT aluminum
    SID

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    I'll go against the flow and say that all you have to do is clean it up a bit and spray it with a rattlecan of spraypaint. The hull is so fast already that the drag won't factor in enough to care. It will stick fine and last fine and be easy to touch up or redo and it will look great if you do it right (which is always the case with spray paint). I like non-reflective flat black.
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    I"ll try to find out what the local vandals used to tag my aluminum shed. It's pretty tough s***.

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    This is a thread I started a little over a year ago on my drift boat http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ect-Drift-Boat The Interlux paint that I used was purchased from West Marine along with primer that is compatible with aluminum. I would have to respectfully disagree with Raingull about using a rattlecan to paint anything aluminum. I have done it in the past and regretted it. Paint is not just paint on aluminum, if using the wrong paint you can sometimes just peel it off with your finger after its dry without much effort. IMO its just not worth taking a chance.

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    I have a 1975 19' sq. stern Grumman. I had a number of gouges and divets (spelling?) in the hull, and wanted to water-proof the rivet lines without having to completely disassemble and reconstruct the boat... Not that they were necesssarily leaking, but thought before painting it, I should at least try to better guarantee its water-tightness..

    I used Marine-Tex and Gluvit for water-proofing the rivets and patching gouges, first lightly sanding the aluminum with a fine-grit sand paper on blocks and then steel wool, just enough to provide a textured surface that would hold material well.

    After the sanding/buffing, I applied acetone sparingly with a rag, then an equally brief mopping with a rag and vinegar; less harsh than the acetone, but still acidic, for etching.

    I then applied the Marine-Tex to the gouges, sanded it smooth, then thoroughly applied the Gluvit to the rivet lines.

    It's holding fine thus far.

    A primary concern with coatings of any kind on thin-walled aluminum (per my own research thus far) has to do not only with the texturing of the surface, but variable rates in expansioon and contraction in cold vs. heat. Not completely unlike vinyl siding in principle, aluminum has its own rate of expansion and contraction in heat and cold. Matching that with something that will expand or contract with it at similar rates is important. It was due to that that I decided against using rhino liner on the inside of the hull.

    Now I have the Gluivit and Marine-Tex properly adhered, but I'm not sure if the acetone application (for etching the hull again) will do bizarre things to the non-aluminum components or not in the event that I procceed with any painting... and the 'zebra look' of the gluvit isn't all that appealing.

    Only one (probably expensive) way to find out....

    On the bright side, if someone takes my boat, at least for now, it'll be pretty easy to identify..

    That's my .02 cents on the topic...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Only Dreaming View Post
    Somewhere on here I read a thread about painting aluminum. I cannot find the thing for the life of me. I am especially interested in the thread because I thought I saw something about a paint that would make the bottom of the canoe "less sticky." Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks
    I'll preface my reply by saying --- I'm neither a professional painter nor pretend to know the best preps and longest lasting paints for given surfaces or applications. Nevertheless... without the correct preparation and using improper paints or coatings - it is a wast of your time, money, and will look like crap in short order additionally you'll be chasing one issue after another.

    #1 I would talk with professionals like those that paint aircraft or paint for marine use applications... these are your best local sources that do this in the real world and not just from sales-pitch.

    A rattle can etching primer and some rattle can acrylic is not the answer on a boat application like it might be for a flag-pole or mailbox.

    If you need a filler... one product to look into is called 'Splash-Zone' 2-part Epoxy Compound Part A & B.

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    Rattlecan worked great for me for years and is still holding for the new owner. Of course if you lay or spray a thick layer your mileage will vary. I have seen Rustoleum rolled on bare aluminum (properly prepared as mentioned above) used on aluminum boats and then the trailer smacking into the boat and denting the hull with zero damage to the paint. There is a lot of info online that recommends Rustoleum for painting aluminum boats. Look around, you may be surprised.
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    If you hate sanding, and I should have mentioned this in my first post, try sandblasting with baking soda. you can even make your own blasting gun quite easily. as someone said, you definitely don't want to use gritty sand silica media on aluminum. I painted my Lund once with absolutely NO prep whatsoever, I didn't even clean it or wipe the dust off, and I certainly didn't use primer. It was still there when I sold it and I used that boat everyday and left it uncovered all year long.

    But...if you want it to look nice and last a long time, you will do things right and take your time and use primer. If you want camo, like I usually do, a few places like Cabelas sell stencils for various patterns, even the RealTree and DuckHunter types.

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