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Thread: Bear Ham

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Bear Ham

    I have a back leg off the Blackie my Son harvested last week soaking in brine, going to try to make a ham. Anyone tried to make a bear ham??

    Steve
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I have a back leg off the Blackie my Son harvested last week soaking in brine, going to try to make a ham. Anyone tried to make a bear ham??

    Steve
    I also was wondering about this. My barber actually did this, said it was fantastic, but I don't know what his process was. He's out and about this summer so can't track him down or I would. Does a guy have to brine a bear hindquarter in order to smoke it? I haven't looked yet but I would be willing to bet that a google search would turn up something. Somebody has to have done it and posted it, as I sure know people have done it.

    Found this link on a quick search....



    Have any folks here tried, or make their own, smoked black bear?

    An excellent way to fix black bear (as long as they have not been on a diet of fish!), is to smoke the meat in small pieces or the hams themselves, just as you would a hog/a ham. Now a non-fish eating, meaning a berry bear, grizz is sort of ok this way, but a black bear I find more desirable.

    Use whatever curing mixtures/seasonings you like, just as you would with a hog/ham, being smoked. Even with none but the basic seasonings, it comes out very fine eating/tasty.

    When properly smoked, you will claim it's not bear, but that you're eating Canadian bacon, it is that good!
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Hopefully those who harvest a black bear will utilize the meat, for properly prepared it does not have to come out as tuff as some folks say it always does.
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    And by all means save and render the fat in to grease! Expecially the pure white intestinal fat - almost like candy when eaten fresh, once you get use to it!

    Now what to do with the rendered fat/grease?
    Use it instead of Crisco, for making pastry dough/crusts> It makes some of the lightest/fluffy pie crusts you'll ever have. If it stays around too long in not being used, and goes rancid on you, the use it for boot leather grease.

    ESPECIALLY use it fresh for making donuts (aka: bear tracks, as many call them!)
    It will make a donut so light, that you'll have to put a rock on it to keep it on the plate!
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    As many may be aware of, a bear is a distant relative of the pig family, and therefore should be cooked accordingly, primarily well done/thoroughly cooked through, because of the possibility of trichinosis.



    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    I have never done one my self but have had AK custom meats here in Soldotna do some for me and they were great.

    Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2

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    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Sounds yummmy.

    But this is as old of a wives tale as their is

    As many may be aware of, a bear is a distant relative of the pig family, and therefore should be cooked accordingly, primarily well done/thoroughly cooked through, because of the possibility of trichinosis.


    Bears and pigs are about as closely related as moose and Mt. Lions.
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    However, wives tale or no, bear consumption is the primary source of trichinosis infection in humans in Alaska. http://www.epi.hss.state.ak.us/bulle...s/b1995_22.htm

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    You go ahead and eat raw bear meat - I will continue to cook mine all of the way through..........

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    I know 2 guys in Idaho that got Trichinosis from Bear Jerky.

    Well , They Thought it was cooked good enough. LOL

  8. #8
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    The ham came out awesome. Smoked it then cooked it 180 degrees, cool and sliced.

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    Yum! We had the Fish Processors on Davis Road process our bear meat last year and the ham was delish.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    The ham came out awesome. Smoked it then cooked it 180 degrees, cool and sliced.
    Ok then I want to see the exact recipe.....lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  11. #11
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    How long did you brine it for?

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Major props to you Steve, seems you go out of your way to utilize as much as possible from every harvest you take.

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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    I did the same thing a number of years ago, but I chipped it and made B-B-Q with it, it was very tasty

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I just used a basic brine recipe and added some gloves and cure. I brined it for 10 days and smoked, I removed it from the smoker and placed it in my oven until a meat prob near the bone read 180. Once sliced it looked and tasted kind of like pastrami.

    I bet it would be good thrown into a crock pot with some BBQ sauce.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I just used a basic brine recipe and added some gloves and cure. I brined it for 10 days and smoked, I removed it from the smoker and placed it in my oven until a meat prob near the bone read 180. Once sliced it looked and tasted kind of like pastrami.

    I bet it would be good thrown into a crock pot with some BBQ sauce.
    What type of gloves are you using for seasoning?

    Sounds like a great way to change up things with bear meat thanks for the idea Steve!

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Oops, I guess I was wearing my gloves, when we added the cloves, LOL,, darn you auto correct...,

    It really does taste good, very mild and very tender.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    No such thing as "basic".....lol. Come on....give it up......what was the brine? And how long did you smoke it before you put it in the oven...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    3 gallons or water, 3 cups of salt and 1 cup of brown sugar, one packet of cure, garlic, black pepper and cloves. Let it soak on the bone fully covered for 10 days injecting the brine into the meat near the bone each day. Removed form the brine and let it skin over and smoked for a day in a cold smoker with cherry wood. Removed from the smoker and baked in the oven until 170 on a meat thermometer. Let cool and deboned and shaved thin. Came out very tasty, taste like lunch meat, maybe a little less salt, but very good. On the road in Homer with the family, sorry for the late reply.

    Steve
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  19. #19

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    About 20 years ago we did a griz ham it really tasted like regular pork ham but just a little greasier.

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