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Thread: Cold smoke salmon recipes

  1. #1
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Cold smoke salmon recipes

    I just finished building a cold smoker, and was wondering if I needed to do anything different (from hot smoking) with my salmon prior to smoking it. I usually can all my hot smoked salmon and I'm hoping that by cold smoking it, then canning it, it will retain a little more juice, and the final product will be a little more moist. My reasoning is that what I've done in the past is double cook the fish and this has caused it to be more dried out than I prefer. Should I prepare/brine the salmon differently with cold smoking?
    IMG_0269.jpgIMG_0268.jpg

  2. #2

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    cold smoke helps preserve meat longer thats why I am building one,,,,the one you built is very nice

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    Supporting Member FamilyMan's Avatar
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    Default Try a scotch smoke

    You'll want to look into a process called a "Scotch Smoke".

    When you buy a very high dollar smoked salmon dish at any 5 star hotel/restaurant worldwide, chances are better than 50 50 it has been Scotch Smoked.

    This is the most complex smoke you'll ever do, and the most labor intensive. But its worth it.

    I'd put the method here; but its too long. I'd post a link to it, but to my knowledge, it is not on the Internet anywhere last I checked. Buy a book entitled "Smoking Salmon and Trout" by Jack Whelan. Pages 39-51 cover it well, though its hard to follow because it discusses both wet and dry brining. I dry brine only, and get around the problem (that is solved by wet brining) by limiting the thickness of what I smoke via this method.

    Try it; you won't go back. If you have any questions about Scotch Smoking, I'd be happy to try to help.

    BTW, Very nice smoker. That should serve you well.
    Dear whatever doesn't kill me, I'm strong enough now. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    You'll want to look into a process called a "Scotch Smoke".

    When you buy a very high dollar smoked salmon dish at any 5 star hotel/restaurant worldwide, chances are better than 50 50 it has been Scotch Smoked.

    This is the most complex smoke you'll ever do, and the most labor intensive. But its worth it.

    I'd put the method here; but its too long. I'd post a link to it, but to my knowledge, it is not on the Internet anywhere last I checked. Buy a book entitled "Smoking Salmon and Trout" by Jack Whelan. Pages 39-51 cover it well, though its hard to follow because it discusses both wet and dry brining. I dry brine only, and get around the problem (that is solved by wet brining) by limiting the thickness of what I smoke via this method.

    Try it; you won't go back. If you have any questions about Scotch Smoking, I'd be happy to try to help.

    BTW, Very nice smoker. That should serve you well.
    You've peaked my curiosity. I think I'll be heading down to the library tomorrow first to see if they have it there. When you talk about dry brining, do you mean when you put down a layer of salt, lay the filet (skin side down) on it, then put another thick layer of salt over the meat?

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    You've peaked my curiosity. I think I'll be heading down to the library tomorrow first to see if they have it there. When you talk about dry brining, do you mean when you put down a layer of salt, lay the filet (skin side down) on it, then put another thick layer of salt over the meat?
    I dry brine with a mixture of sugars, salt, spices, and a few secret ingredients (no liquid added).

    +1 nice smoker.
    He who knows nothing is closer to the truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors. ~Thomas Jefferson

  6. #6
    Supporting Member FamilyMan's Avatar
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    Default Here's a link to the book

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    You've peaked my curiosity. I think I'll be heading down to the library tomorrow first to see if they have it there. When you talk about dry brining, do you mean when you put down a layer of salt, lay the filet (skin side down) on it, then put another thick layer of salt over the meat?
    Here is a link to buy the book, in case you can't find it closer to you: http://www.amazon.com/Smoking-Salmon.../dp/1550173022

    Yes, dry brining just like you describe. With Scotch smoking, you go thru many iterations of that, once with salt, then with brown sugar, then salt again, etc.... for quite some time before smoking.

    Also, one of the key instructions that are repeated throughout the brining process is to wipe the fillets (tail to head only) with a clean towel soaked a fine scotch (whiskey), then allowing that to dry for many hours. Each time that juncture in the instructions comes up, to cook gets a little scotch too.
    Dear whatever doesn't kill me, I'm strong enough now. Thanks.

  7. #7
    Member AKnook's Avatar
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    Default

    That is one heck of a smoker. wow

  8. #8

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    here's what I found, http://www.wedlinydomowe.com/meat-smoking maybe somewhere to start. if anyone has knowlage on cold smoking time's and for diff types of meat chime in

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the compliments on the smoker. Just a follow up note, I used it for the first time earlier this week and cold smoked 40 fillets for a little over 24 hours of continuous smoke. I used Hickory, Cherry, and Mesquite wood chunks, and then canned all but one filet, which I used for locks. I always can the salmon that I smoke and wanted to try cold smoking, because I think that after canning the hot smoked fish, it turns out too dry. Fortunately my plan worked, they often don't, so I was very pleasantly surprised when I opened the first can to find a very tasty, moist fish.

    IMG_0439.jpg IMG_0445.jpg

  10. #10

    Question Killing the Parasites in your fish

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    I just finished building a cold smoker, and was wondering if I needed to do anything different (from hot smoking) with my salmon prior to smoking it. I usually can all my hot smoked salmon and I'm hoping that by cold smoking it, then canning it, it will retain a little more juice, and the final product will be a little more moist. My reasoning is that what I've done in the past is double cook the fish and this has caused it to be more dried out than I prefer. Should I prepare/brine the salmon differently with cold smoking?
    IMG_0269.jpgIMG_0268.jpg
    When cold smoking or using your salmon for Sushi, you want to be sure that you freeze your salmon or halibut at least 30 days prior to eating. This will kill the parasites that are in the meat. Other wise you will need to bring your fish to 160^F for at least 30 minutes. Cold smoking is smoked at less then 100^F.

    http://www.ext.colostate.edu/safefoo.../v12n2s02.html

    BTW that's a nice looking smoker! lots of capasity for an Alaska size harvest.


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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    Thanks for the compliments on the smoker. Just a follow up note, I used it for the first time earlier this week and cold smoked 40 fillets for a little over 24 hours of continuous smoke. I used Hickory, Cherry, and Mesquite wood chunks, and then canned all but one filet, which I used for locks. I always can the salmon that I smoke and wanted to try cold smoking, because I think that after canning the hot smoked fish, it turns out too dry. Fortunately my plan worked, they often don't, so I was very pleasantly surprised when I opened the first can to find a very tasty, moist fish.

    IMG_0439.jpg IMG_0445.jpg
    What did you end up doing for a brine? I see a cord behind the smoker so I take it you modified that "little weber?" with some type of electric burner? I've never done whole fillets but have wanted to, so how bout a few detail?s....Thanks.

    BTW...it looks like you built the smoker out of 1x T&G pine?
    "The emotions that good hunters need to cultivate are love and service more than courage. The sentiments of the hunt then become translated into art." James Swan, In Defense of Hunting

  12. #12
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    What did you end up doing for a brine? I see a cord behind the smoker so I take it you modified that "little weber?" with some type of electric burner? I've never done whole fillets but have wanted to, so how bout a few detail?s....Thanks.

    BTW...it looks like you built the smoker out of 1x T&G pine?
    I first did a salt water brine for about 12 hrs., then made up a brine/marinade (made with white wine, soy sauce, Tobasco sauce, water, and misc. spices) and soaked it in that for about 15 hours or so. The cord that you see is for a little fan that I installed in the duct work in the smoker. This was to help facilitate bringing the smoke into the smoker. Even when the Weber was cranking out tons of smoke, nothing escaped from the Weber itself, it all got pulled into the smoker. I was able to fit 40 whole filets (10 per rack) into the smoker, so as not having to do multiple batches. I used a new large trash can (I ended up lining it anyway with a contractor bag) to brine and marinade the filets, and just made sure that there was always plenty of ice to keep it cold.

    Ya, I used T&G pine that I bought at Lowe's, old refridgerator racks that I picked up at the dump, tin roofing (a friend gave me his leftover after putting a new roof on his house), the Weber grill was given to me by a guy that was leaving state, and a 4" fan that I bought at Walmart for $7. I didn't put a permenant bottom in it, because I wanted to be able to easily clean it up, so I just used an old piece of plywood, then slid it out when I was done and sprayed it off with the power washer.

    The original duct ( aluminum dryer vent hose) that I used, failed. It lasted about an hour than burned up right where it came out of the Weber. I ended up replacing it with 4" hard stove pipe, and lengthened it to a little over 10', so by the time the smoke got to the smoker, it was just a little bit warmer than the ambient air temp.

    Oh, and the door handle is the antler off the HUGE moose I killed last year.

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