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Thread: Clam Whisperer Ninilchik Style

  1. #1
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    Default Clam Whisperer Ninilchik Style

    Wife and I took advantage of Mondayís low Cook Inlet tide and tried the beach at Ninilchik State Recreation Area for razors. The weather was fantastic and there was very little wind which made for pleasant digging. The clam show was fantastic. Just a couple observations I wish to mention;the beach was very mucky compared to the last time we visited two years ago and most of the clams were all similar sized.

    The mud was tiresome to slog through. I was headed to the sandbar where I like to dig, but I thought the tough walking would prevent a hasty retreat when the tide turned, so I stayed on the main beach near waterís edge this time. Anyways, the clams were showing so well that I had my limit in no time. The smallest clam had a shell length of three inches and the largest was five. The rest were all in the same age class of about four and a half inches. I didnít see a single baby clam. I wonder if the lack of the smaller clams is related to the big November storm last winter that washed so many of them ashore.

    The drive back to Eagle River was nicer than usual. Stopped at Quartz Creek CC for lunch on the Lake. We didnít run into any Seward Hwy road warriors until we hit the downhill grade of Turnagain Pass. One suicide rider on a crotch-rocket almost splattered himself upon the grill of a Carlile Truck passinga line of cars and one fella with bad judgment driving a brown Chevy Cruze rental that was tail- gating everyone. Stayed out of their way, got home safe and processed clams. Some are in the freezer, a few are waiting to transformed into chowder and some are in the big chief smoker.
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  2. #2
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    Cool clams

    sorry to miss the shindig. glad to hear clams are a little bigger this year.

  3. #3
    Member Armed_alaskan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coaldust View Post
    Just a couple observations I wish to mention;the beach was very mucky compared to the last time we visited two years ago and most of the clams were all similar sized.

    The smallest clam had a shell length of three inches and the largest was five. The rest were all in the same age class of about four and a half inches. I didnít see a single baby clam. I wonder if the lack of the smaller clams is related to the big November storm last winter that washed so many of them ashore.

    The clam die off happens during any clam life cycle. The last time Millions of clam died off. Which was approx 5 years ago.

    So all the new clams will be about the same size, and the normal cycle thus begins again. You'll start to see smaller clam soon enough, enjoy....

  4. #4
    Member Armed_alaskan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coaldust;1131281
    [FONT=arial
    Just a couple observations I wish to mention;the beach was very mucky compared to the last time we visited two years ago and most of the clams were all similar sized.

    The smallest clam had a shell length of three inches and the largest was five. The rest were all in the same age class of about four and a half inches. I didnít see a single baby clam. I wonder if the lack of the smaller clams is related to the big November storm last winter that washed so many of them ashore.
    [/FONT]

    Quote Originally Posted by Armed_alaskan View Post
    The clam die off happens during any clam life cycle. The last time Millions of clam died off. Which was approx 5 years ago.

    So all the new clams will be about the same size, and the normal cycle thus begins again. You'll start to see smaller clam soon enough, enjoy....
    The life cycle of razor clams is simple and unique. Razor clams usually reproduce first at age four or five and live about 14 to 18 years. Reproduction is triggered when Cook Inlet waters reach a temperature of about 55 degrees> After floating in the larval stage for four to six weeks, the clams form a small shell and settle into the sandy tidal beach. The clams are ready for harvest in about four years.

    http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/units/clamglch.htm

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