Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Modifying my 20' flat bottom hunting boat

  1. #1
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default Modifying my 20' flat bottom hunting boat

    Decided to do some major modifications to my hunting boat. I cut slats in the bottom of the boat from the front to the rear and welded 2" aluminum angle over them so water will drain all the way to the back. Will make cleanout much easier also. Fabricated and welded in a tunnel for my jet. Next I will flip it over and start on the transom. Am going to raise it 8". Will post more pics as work progresses.






  2. #2
    Member logman 49's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Just South of Moose Pass
    Posts
    353

    Default

    Looks like you are doing a nice job, but your shop is wayyyyyy to tidy.

  3. #3

    Default

    Looks good. I've heard it's difficult to weld on that thinner aluminum. Good job!

  4. #4
    Member KelvinG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna, AK
    Posts
    387

    Default

    Very nice welding.

    I owned an 1860 tunnel hull jon boat with an 80hp jet. It was very nimble but had a tendency to slide in tight turns. So I added 5 strakes like you are doing. That fixed the tendency to slide, it held in corners well. But I lost some agility. I had to definitely turn the steering wheel to get it to turn. Once I “broke the straight tracking” I could ease up on the steering and it cornered nicely.

    All in all I think it was a fair trade, (I had slid onto a beach and into a bank before added the strakes).

    Have fun!

  5. #5
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default More updates

    Finished welding in the new transom and tunnel and drains. With all the dents and dings, it is hard to to do a proper fitment prior to welding. Also, in some spots, I think there is some type of unknown alloy in the old aluminum as it flares up when I pass through it. I clean all the aluminum real good prior to welding with acetone and a stainless steel brush. I think it would have been easier time wise to build a new aluminum boat instead of trying to modify this old one. Oh well, live and learn.






  6. #6
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    I raised the sides 5" and tied them into the transom. I utilized the same design as a wooldridge as far as the sides go. A few more minor fitments and welds and I will be ready to put the motor on.




  7. #7

    Default

    What kind of welding setup are you using? I'm in the process of learning to weld aluminum.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Sandpoint, ID
    Posts
    1,974

    Default

    Very nice work Gut!!

    I added 10" to my 1754 sides and put a 7' long cabin on the front using a Lincoln spool gun on a MIG and it worked on the 1/8" material I used but it did not work well on lighter stuff. If I were doing it again I would have spent the extra money and gone TIG.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  9. #9
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruger01 View Post
    What kind of welding setup are you using? I'm in the process of learning to weld aluminum.
    I am using a Millermatic 350P with the AlumaPro push-pull gun. The 350P has the pulsing capability which makes welding aluminum a lot easier. I just bought this setup and this is the first project I am using it on. Really like it. There is definitely a learning curve to aluminum. I am very comfortable welding steel and thought aluminum would not be that hard but it does have some major differences. Unlike steel, aluminum should be really clean to weld it good especially the 6000 series aluminum like 6061 and 6063. The 5000 series aluminum is a little more forgiving in regards to being clean.

    Welding is kind of a passion/hobby of mine. I have gone through several of the consumer type welders over the years and finally decided to invest the money and buy the top of the line equipment. I am learning this aluminum as I go and am enjoying it more and more now that I am starting to get the hang of it.

  10. #10
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lowrider View Post
    Very nice work Gut!!

    I added 10" to my 1754 sides and put a 7' long cabin on the front using a Lincoln spool gun on a MIG and it worked on the 1/8" material I used but it did not work well on lighter stuff. If I were doing it again I would have spent the extra money and gone TIG.
    Thanks for the compliment. My Millermatic 350P is sure nice for welding aluminum. It has the ability to dial in to whatever thickness you are welding. I really like it. I have a tig setup also that I will be using on some of the lighter gauge material on the inside of the boat. Will post more pics as the work progresses.

  11. #11
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Whitehorse Yukon
    Posts
    1,345

    Default

    Looks great.
    For what its worth, don't use Acetone to clean. It leaves a minor residue that you can notice while welding. Its quite noticable when using TIG. Isopropyl Alcohol is the way to go for really getting a good clean surface.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    I have no opinion on Acetone just have not use it enough to know. Isopropyl Alcohol is very good if you use the 99%. What I prefer is car starting fluid, the high presser get deep into the cracks.

    What works best for me is to degrease the area before using a clean S.S. Brush and all ways brush away from you and do not use a grinding wheel if you want a perfect weld.

  13. #13
    Member Yukoner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Whitehorse Yukon
    Posts
    1,345

    Default

    I source the 99% out of one of our drug stores. Don't know why they have it, but they always do. 1 gallon jugs. When I am TIGing CroMo pieces, I soak a small SS brush in the stuff, and then scrub/brush the surface just prior to welding, then wipe it dry with a lint free rag.
    Never wrestle with a pig.
    you both get dirty;
    the Pig likes it.

  14. #14
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    Thanks for the tips guys. What do you think of using de-natured alchohol? I have a gallon of that.

  15. #15
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    Finally got the motor mounted and the floor installed. Almost ready for hunting season.










  16. #16
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default Ready for Hunting

    I fabricated some ramps for driving the 4 wheelers and argos into the boat. They are easily removable and mobile.








  17. #17
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Thats a nice looking setup! Will you have to carry the large set with you to unload the wheelers or will you be able to use the shorties?

  18. #18
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Thats a nice looking setup! Will you have to carry the large set with you to unload the wheelers or will you be able to use the shorties?
    I use the short ones just for the inside of the boat. I have two sets of the long ones. That way we can use a set on each side of the river that we cross.

  19. #19
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Do you use the ramps to get your wheelers across creeks/rivers out there? I have seen guys carry short sections of ladder or steel planking to cross the little cricks that are just over a tire wide and deep but never anything longer than that.

    Are you going to add anymore supports to the transom? I know nothing about building boats but have spent a good amount of time in them and have seen a lot of them with a triangular gusset at the top of the gunnel going to the transom. Seems like it would help provide a bit more support.

  20. #20
    Member gutleap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Posts
    308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Do you use the ramps to get your wheelers across creeks/rivers out there? I have seen guys carry short sections of ladder or steel planking to cross the little cricks that are just over a tire wide and deep but never anything longer than that.

    Are you going to add anymore supports to the transom? I know nothing about building boats but have spent a good amount of time in them and have seen a lot of them with a triangular gusset at the top of the gunnel going to the transom. Seems like it would help provide a bit more support.
    We use the ramps only for the river crossing. Once accross the river, we stow the boat and ramps and continue on into moose camp about 15 miles.

    The transom has 2" X 4" X .125 horizontal stringers on the inside from side to side. It also has 4 vertical stringers running between them. These are covered with .090 sheet on the front and back of transom. The entire transom is tied into the sides with the 2" X 3" X .125 stringers running the entire length of the boat on both sides. Also tied in at the corners using a .125" backing plate. The one gusset brace in the middle of the transom tied in at the floor is what the new Alweld boats utilize and is where I got the idea.

    I am no boat builder either but I took most of my ideas for modifying this hunting boat from existing boats. The side rails are similar in design to what Wooldridge uses and the transom and bottom of boat is similar to what Alweld uses. I figure if it works for them it will be good enough for me.

    We are headed out hunting tomorrow for 10 days. I will have some photos of the boat in action and hopefully a few moose when I get back.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •