Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: turnagain trout?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default turnagain trout?

    just wondering... do any of the streams along the turnagain arm have fly fishable trout populations? I'm thinking of streams like Bird, Portage, Placer, 20 mile, etc... I drive by them all the time and wonder, but have never heard of anything, except for rumors of a hikable stream out of girdwood that has trout or dollies in it. you would think there must be some trout in some of these streams along the arm, maybe in the upper stretches or something. does anyone have experience or info to share concerning this topic?
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    Well there is that silver salmon run at 20 mile that I would imagane has trout? I mean it makes sense. There are many clear water streams flowing into placer and 20 mile but the hard part is getting there and finding them. I tried walking Placer duck jump shooting and man it was touch. Even that trail out there for silvers is something.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default

    I know many of the rivers over there have salmon running in them, which is why it makes sense that there should be trout somewhere nearby, but i've never heard of anyone targeting them in the turnagain arm area. Anyone have any specific spots they know about? heard anything?
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    Very few even fish Silvers out there really. I have a feeling as trout are underappreciated that not many people try fishing out there. I know I've driven past there to fish Quartz for trout. Now you got me wondering.

  5. #5
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Allot of the area is a no go for trout....I know those streams are really trouty looking but I worked the snot out of that area when I first moved up here and it wasn't worth the effort. Too many really productive areas to spend all day for one or two fish.

    Rick P

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default

    if the trout fishing is poor in those streams it must be because they are coming directly out of glaciers and not glacier fed lakes, and don't flow into a large river that doesn't freeze in the winter. I would guess that those rivers, being so cold, freeze too solid in the winter for trout to survive...and with no lake to find winter refuge in, there's not sufficient wintertime habitat to be able to tough it out. that's what i would guess, but just an educated guss is all... does anyone know if this is the real reason? or am i way off here?
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  7. #7
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    between wasilla and palmer
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    I have heard there are trout in bird creek from a guy I know with F&G.

  8. #8
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by markw3 View Post
    does anyone know if this is the real reason? or am i way off here?
    newer, colder rivers don't have much food.

    I am willing to bet there are some big dollies in the twenty mile I mean the amount of salom in the system plus the amout of hooligan there just has to be. I'd say and clearwater stream flowing in will hold some fish.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Never fished bird creek it's always been a little crowded for my taste

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    520

    Default

    We fished for dollies in Girdwood when I was a kid, but anything over six inches was considered to be a trophy.

    Someone who's name will not be mentioned planted dollies into a lake near where the school is now and they grew quite a bit larger. I'm sure that's all gone now...Louis

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    867

    Default

    Used to fish upper Bird Creek as a kid. Tons of dollies, I think Dad would take the road just before the Bird Creek Bar (name) before it burnt all the way down...

    Good memories, spending all day up there.

    George

  12. #12

    Default a little spot

    i know of a spot near portage. it was good for salmon and dollies. 1 mile hike from road, very little known. i dont know if rules have changed since i last fished it 20 years ago. I have often thought of that little crick.
    PM me.
    bushwaker

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    5,639

    Smile Ancient history. . .

    Years and years ago, back during the summers of '61 and '62, I worked in Portage. That was before the 'Quake. I used to walk down the tracks toward Seward and fish dollies in the innumerable beaver ponds along the tracks on the park side. Bill Peters, who ran a garage in Portage and who drove an old WWII 4X4 used to take me back in on the park road, where we'd turn off into the brush and drive across the river on a gravel bar. There were lots of little ponds back in that area too. It was all little dollies, but they were good eating.

    The 'Quake changed all that. . .


  14. #14

    Default

    Penguin creek i believe is the name that runs into bird creek ( all hearsay) and suposedly has resident dolly varden ....but make sure you are WELL armed for bear!!!

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default ingrahm

    how about ingrahm creek (the one you cross just before climbing up into the pass)? it looks fly fishing friendly, and gets a run of salmon, so i thought it might hold some trout... anyone know anything about it?
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  16. #16
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcus View Post
    Years and years ago, back during the summers of '61 and '62, I worked in Portage. That was before the 'Quake. I used to walk down the tracks toward Seward and fish dollies in the innumerable beaver ponds along the tracks on the park side.....The 'Quake changed all that. . . :
    It may have changed, but it didn't die.

    I worked for the Alaska Railroad in the mid-70s there, and had lots of fishing time. Walking about a mile south of Portage on the tracks up Placer Valley you will come to a pair of twin culverts under the tracks. I've caught dollies up to 3 lbs there.

    Walking up the tracks toward Whittier on the tracks, past the Portage rail yard, you'll come to a trestle. Walk downstream from the trestle a short distance to where that creek empties into another. I've caught dollies there, too.

  17. #17

    Default

    I have never caught a trout in 20 Mile but have hooked some very nice dollies. Finding the big ones are tough though. Being the bait chucker I am I figured if there was a decent population of trout I would have atleast caught one.

  18. #18
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    170

    Default

    A few of the ponds in Portage Valley are stocked with sterile rainbow trout, but the only trout I know of caught down there was a steelhead by Gunnar Pederson (he's written a few books) out of Glacier Creek. Thought was it was a "stray" or "pioneer". Whatever the term, I heard it tasted GREAT on the BBQ! Lots of Dolly Varden in that area, and the biggest are in Placer River drainage.

  19. #19

    Default im not the only one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    It may have changed, but it didn't die.

    I worked for the Alaska Railroad in the mid-70s there, and had lots of fishing time. Walking about a mile south of Portage on the tracks up Placer Valley you will come to a pair of twin culverts under the tracks. I've caught dollies up to 3 lbs there.

    Walking up the tracks toward Whittier on the tracks, past the Portage rail yard, you'll come to a trestle. Walk downstream from the trestle a short distance to where that creek empties into another. I've caught dollies there, too.
    And i Thought i was the only one who fished that little creek. I use to catch dollies there all the time.

  20. #20
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bushwaker View Post
    Originally Posted by Mark
    It may have changed, but it didn't die.

    I worked for the Alaska Railroad in the mid-70s there, and had lots of fishing time. Walking about a mile south of Portage on the tracks up Placer Valley you will come to a pair of twin culverts under the tracks. I've caught dollies up to 3 lbs there.

    Walking up the tracks toward Whittier on the tracks, past the Portage rail yard, you'll come to a trestle. Walk downstream from the trestle a short distance to where that creek empties into another. I've caught dollies there, too.
    And i Thought i was the only one who fished that little creek. I use to catch dollies there all the time.
    Both places tend to be very lonely.

    In September 2005 I hunted moose in Placer with a friend who was lucky enough to get a permit. The first weekend we tried to take my Zodiak/jet up Placer, but it's underpowered and couldn't get our fat asses on step. We putted up to the twin culverts, tied off, then walked up the valley on the RR tracks. That was the first time I'd been back to that spot since the late 70's.

    On our slow putt-putt trip up the river, we saw lots of silvers in the sloughs.

    Then, after walking up the valley a couple of miles, my buddy thought he saw a couple of guys walking the tracks ahead of us, maybe a half mile ahead. It was raining sideways, and he had his binocs tucked into his raingear. Mine were exposed, and I lifted them to my eyes. It wasn't two men. It looked like a moose walking away from us until it turned it's head to the side. It was a huge griz. Since it was walking between the rails like we were and I'm an old railroader, I got a good idea of how wide it's ass was because the rails are 56 1/2" apart.

    That bear's ass was approaching 4' wide.

    We ended up shooting a bull the next weekend, on Friday. Even though brown bear season didn't open there until Oct 15th (and ends up getting closed every year by EO), we figured we'd go back to the gutpile to see if a blackie would be on it.

    No way. By Sunday morning Mr. Griz had buried the remains.

    We explored the valley for quite a ways with the rented boat we got for that second weekend. Every sandbar we stopped at, Mr. Griz's sign was there. No other bears appeared to be around.

    He owns that place............

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •