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Thread: Hook Shank regulations for Sockeye?

  1. #1
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    Default Hook Shank regulations for Sockeye?

    So instead of using the traditional coho/russian river flies for sockeye, I would like to use a yarn fly on an octopus style hook. What is the maximum hook shank gap that you can have?

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    3/8 of an inch or less as the regs read.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    Member Salmon-Thirty-Salmon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    3/8 of an inch or less as the regs read.
    Correct, for the Upper Kenai and Russian drainage. If you fish the lower Kenai (or other rivers) that regulation does not [necessarily] apply.

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    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salmon-Thirty-Salmon View Post
    Correct, for the Upper Kenai and Russian drainage. If you fish the lower Kenai (or other rivers) that regulation does not [necessarily] apply.
    Even though it doesnt apply Ive found that a smaller hook works a little better. Originally someone suggested I use a 5/0 hook (like I use for kings) but I was missing a lot of hook ups. I started using a 2/0 or 3/0 and started hooking more and with a correct drift and the absence of the rip and drag I also stopped foul hooking fish. More in the cooler and less damage to the watershed equals a good day on the river.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    in general I think smaller hooks are better any way (within reason).

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    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    Even though it doesnt apply Ive found that a smaller hook works a little better. Originally someone suggested I use a 5/0 hook (like I use for kings) but I was missing a lot of hook ups. I started using a 2/0 or 3/0 and started hooking more and with a correct drift and the absence of the rip and drag I also stopped foul hooking fish. More in the cooler and less damage to the watershed equals a good day on the river.
    Give that man a GOLD star!

    I've seen some ridiculously HUGE hooks used to flip-N-rip reds in the lower Kenai, up to 8/0!

    An appropriately sized hook with smaller caliber wire will be EASILY driven into the jaw with just the action of the current against a tight line. NO RIP REQUIRED!
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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    The KeenEye MD

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    Are there any hook size regulations for the rivers on Kodiak Island? I looked in the regs and can't find anything that restricts the size of hook you use.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lapaiki39 View Post
    Are there any hook size regulations for the rivers on Kodiak Island? I looked in the regs and can't find anything that restricts the size of hook you use.

    Nope, it's game on in Kodiak, though I would also suggest using a size 2-3 octopus hook for the reds there. It the perfect size for getting good hooksets and is small enough to hook the occasional big sea run dolly.

    Ditto on everything said above about the proper size hooks and using a proper drift with no rip. I have found casting at ten to eleven o'clock and lifting my rod directly up with a slow but steady pull at two to three o'clock produces by far more fish than any rippers around me. I have had times where I have my drift so properly in tune I've hooked 3-4 fish back to back with no one else even bumping a fish, it's all about the gentle but firm finesse of the proper drift and hookset. Oh and don't be afraid to play around with your weights. If you aren't getting hits with say a 2 foot leader switch it up continually until you find the fish paystreak.

    Hopefully there will be so many fish this year you won't have to worry about anything other than having a stick, a hook, and some line.

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