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Thread: Question about regs?

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    Default Question about regs?

    I have read that all fish that are foul hooked have to be released--what constitutes "foul hooked"--is a fish that is hooked from the outside near the mouth considered foul hooked?

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    Quote Originally Posted by flybug View Post
    I have read that all fish that are foul hooked have to be released--what constitutes "foul hooked"--is a fish that is hooked from the outside near the mouth considered foul hooked?
    Ask a F&W and they will tell you "NEAR the mouth" is NOT "IN the mouth."

    Then there is the red fisheries, lol. Previous threads hash the inside out and outside in aspect. Not able to track down a thread for you at the moment, but they are there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flybug View Post
    I have read that all fish that are foul hooked have to be released--what constitutes "foul hooked"--is a fish that is hooked from the outside near the mouth considered foul hooked?
    yes, it is.

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    Thanks for the clarification. So my guess is that flies like the articulated egg sucking leech and flies with a stinger hook are going to generate a fair percentage of foul hooked fish.

    Of course, if the fishing is as good as I keep hearing, I will be releasing a lot of fish anyway!
    Last edited by flybug; 06-03-2012 at 17:10. Reason: add to post

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    I haven't seen any increase in foul hookups using articulated flies over long shanked flies.

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    foul hooks wont increase with the use of articulating flies. What matters is how you fish it. If you swing and drag your gonna get foul hooked, if you drift it and wait for a take down your golden as a rule of thumb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    foul hooks wont increase with the use of articulating flies. What matters is how you fish it. If you swing and drag your gonna get foul hooked, if you drift it and wait for a take down your golden as a rule of thumb.
    Thanks--that is good to know. So does drifting the fly get you more hookups as well?

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    yes, if you know how to read the water and what line to drift. Anther important factor to remember is if your "dead drifting" your fly it does give it a more natural presentation. If your line drags on the bottom due to sinkers or you moving your line, it jerks the fly and it could alarm the fish. And having your line drag the bottom or run underneath the fish will also account for foul hooked fish. Now don't get me wrong bouncing off the bottom is fine but dragging is bad.

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    So it is really a lot like nymph fishing or even dry fly fishing in trout streams--trying to maintain a natural drift is the key. I guess that is why several have sugested an intermediate sink line instead of lead core lines. Also, I would guess that flies that are too heavy will not drift properly--right?

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    I yeah I guess you could say it is a lot like nymphing. About the flies you don't want to put to much lead in them that the sink like a rock, if I am not mistaken there is a reg on how much a fly can weigh as well. Not to mention it all depends on how you tie flies. Put it in the water and watch it, if it that way you know if it "swims true". As for line I use a floating line, but sinking lines do have there place, it just all depends on the water you are fishing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    I yeah I guess you could say it is a lot like nymphing. About the flies you don't want to put to much lead in them that the sink like a rock, if I am not mistaken there is a reg on how much a fly can weigh as well. Not to mention it all depends on how you tie flies. Put it in the water and watch it, if it that way you know if it "swims true". As for line I use a floating line, but sinking lines do have there place, it just all depends on the water you are fishing.
    Really! There is a weight limit on flies! I don't think I have any scales that sensitive!

    I did tie a couple egg sucking leeches with the large barbell eyes, and I was worried that it would be the casting characteristics that prevent me from using them!

    As for swimming true, I know how my clousers and minnow imitations should swim, but how is a flesh fly suppose to swim? I assume that you are talking about how fast it sinks and that it shouldn't sink like a chunk of lead. A lot of what I have read talks about getting the fly down to the fish--I guess that is best done by giving the fly time to sink and a moderate amount of weight.

    Thanks for the heads up on the fly weight limit--I will try to find that.

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    Does this mean that all weighted flies are prohibited (from ADFG).

    Freshwater sport fishing: (1) A person may not take fish in fresh water with (a) a fixed or weighted hooks and lures.

    Gear for fly-fishing-only waters: In waters designated as fly-fishing-only waters, sport fishing is permitted only as follows: (1) with not more than one unweighted, single-hook fly with gap between point and shank of 3/8 inch or less;

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    I found the specifics:

    artificial fly (unweighted)
    means a fly which weighs less than one-fourth ounce in its entirety.


    I don't think anything I have tied comes close to 7 grams!

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    in most cases you will never use a fly that heavy, or tie them. Truth be told I only tie flies with lead in them for fishing salmon if I use it at all. Now bead heads and such, I do use them, and that is a good question about weighted flies and retention, I don't have answer, but it really doesn't apply to me as I almost never retain any fish, if I have a choice in the matter. Not to mention most places I fish there is no retention of trout any way. But if your worried about it I wouldn't be, as I would be hard pressed to believe any trooper would be able to hold a fly and tell if it is weighted or not, besides the obvious barbell or cone head. I think it is more for people that like to use "seward salmon flies".

    Oh and as for "swiming true", it refers to how your fly presents it's self in the water to fish. you wouldn't want to use say a smolt pattern or an ESL that sits side ways in the water, or shows some other oddity while you fish it. You want it to drift as close to natural as you can get it. This way the fish has no reservations about striking it.

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    I do release most of the fish I catch down here except when I am fishing for a fish fry--I don't freeze fish. I will be keeping my limit of silver salmon during the 3 days I am in Alaska, but I hope to be releasing a good many( I hope --I hope!). We will be fishing in the Yakutat area in late Sept.

    As for the weight limit on flies, I am sure that if there was not a limit, there would be people tying a feather to a snatch hook and calling it a fly--ha!

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    Best of luck to you, and I hope you have a good trip up here. One note that is not universally known about catch-and-release as pertains specifically to silvers - they have a VERY high mortality rate for catch-and-release. In many areas, you are not allowed to release a landed coho (silver). The closer they are to the salt, the worse it is, for some reason, and if you are fly fishing in Yakutat, you will likely be fishing salmon that have very recently made their way into fresh water. So please keep this in mind. Even if that area does not have the same regulation, know that many released coho will die. So good luck bringing in a limit of salmon, but please stop fishing once you get it. Switch up your gear and target the rainbows and dollies, and you'll have plenty of fun

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    I would love to catch a few rainbows and dollies if they are available. I have caught a good many smaller rainbows and brookies in NC--mostly stocked fish--during the CR season there. My guess is that the rainbows there would be a little bigger and more natural. I have never caught dollies or graylings and wouldn't mind seeing a few of those first hand.

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    I don't know about rainbows, or dollies, but I do know they have cutt's down there. Plenty of other things to chase, there might even be some early steel around as well.

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    Not sure what you consider "big", but I was there this spring and landed several dollies in the 20" range (see photo of the smallest dolly I caught, ~17"). I hear you can catch resident rainbows, although we didn't catch any. Theoretically, any stream that supports a steelhead run will have rainbow trout as well, and with big runs of reds, silvers, and steelhead spawning in the river, there's plenty of food for the fish to get nice and big
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    When it comes to freshwater, anything over 12" is nice, over 18" is huge--I have had 100 fish days on the streams in NC, but they are all 8 to 12". That is why I fish salwater--there big is 30" or more. Cutthroats would be nice--what type flies would be best for them--regular trout flies like dries and nymphs?

    As for the fly weight limit--I did get a friend to weigh my heaviest fly that I tied for my Alaska trip--an egg sucking leech with heavy barbell eye--heavy enough I know I will be ducking when I am casting it, but still only 3 grams.

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