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Thread: saltwater salmon early June?

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    Default saltwater salmon early June?

    I have family coming up and they want to fish salmon in the salt out of homer. One king a day is hardly worth the price of the boat, Are there any reds to be caught in the salt during early june? Or would it be the 6 kings (one per person) and then be done?

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    two kings per day more than a mile offshore of deepcreek... not many reds to catch then sorry. Seldovia will have kings in the slough, (2 per day) there will also be kings in the fishing hole (2 per day)
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Unless reds are schooled up in a bay, catching them in the salt seems like a nearly impossible proposition. Am I wrong on this? I've never caught one while jigging or trolling...they're plankton eaters, right? As such, they're not a fish to target in the salt unless you're snagging them (Main Bay style).

    That being said, 6 kings isn't enough? What about a combo for kings and halibut? That would be 6 kings and 12 flatfish...quite a load of meat! Of course, I'm not that familar with king catch rates out of Homer. Is limiting out really a reasonable expectation? I'm curious, as I might give it a shot around the same time frame as well.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I've read about folks catching sockeye using bare red hooks, as they resemble the krill the fish eat. Never tried it myself.

    I'd say a combo chinook and halibut charter would be the way to go. Limiting on both species is an iffy deal though, ie no gurantee there.

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    At the end of King season and before the silvers start up, we see upwards of 3 reds per day mixing in with the early pinks and silvers. They will hit on trolling gear, although I'm sure it's an anger/irritation strike rather than a feeding strike. Clients are always impressed when I'm gutting a batch of pinks, and I run across a red with the bright orange meat inside.

    Are the ADF&G seasonal regs out yet for south-central? We've just got ours announced today in SE. Looks like residents get 3 daily while non-residents get 2 in May and 1 from June on with a 4 fish annual limit.

    Combine that with the various bottom fish regulations for resident/non-resident, guided/non-guided, crew/client and charter/non-comp and I might just have to hire a PhD to figure out what I can keep and not!

    -Case
    M/V CanCan - 34' SeaWolf - Bandon, OR
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    Default thanks

    Thanks for the info guys.

    Brian for three couples to go out on a boat and keep 2 fish per couple for 450 bucks after tipping, is nto worth it, I guess I am maybe just a little too used to life in the bush.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    fishermann - Oh, I absolutely understand that! My in-laws are absolutely set on fishing halibut out of Homer this July, even though we have a boat to use in Whittier (my father's commercial fishing boat). They want to pay for the charter, but quite honestly they are not in the financial position to be laying down $1,000 for a day of fishing. Yikes! I think what I'm going to do instead is rent a boat for $350 plus gas for a ten hour day. We may not catch quite as many fish as a charter with intimate local knowledge, but for $550 less I'll take that chance. PM me if you want the info on the boat rental. I haven't rented their boat yet, so I can't give you a personal recommendation.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I did something similar when a friend came up. He'd never fished before, and I could have gone out on a charter with him for about $400 for the two of us, or as I did, rent a skiff in Whittier for $300, and take my wife along. We had an absolute blast exploring on out to hummer bay and the entrance to culross, I got him to hook and land a pink, and my wife hooked a nice silver which spit the hook just before I could net it. I caught the smallest halibut I've ever caught, jigging in 450' of water, which I threw back. His pink was very expensive but I wouldn't trade that day for limiting on a charter.

    Not knocking the charters, but there are other ways to have fun on the ocean, catch some fish, and not spend an arm and a leg.

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    for 6 guys to limit on kings and halibut would be a phenomenal day... if that type of trip wouldn't be worth the price of admission, then there's no guided fishing trip that will satisfy you - and you shouldn't book one. i'm not saying there's anything wrong with that... i'm a guide, and i still can't believe how much some folks pay to step on my boat - it's outrageous, but they usually step off satisfied, or at least they act that way - but the last thing a guide wants is an unpleasable client, so my advice would be to avoid the situation altogether.
    www.akfishology.com

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    Default Charters

    Most lay folks don't have a clue as to how expensive it really is to run a charter business. There isn't very much profit margin, everything is expensive as hell, and there's a certain risk involved.
    Marc Theiler

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I bet you could catch some cook inlet reds if you used electronics right and knew their migration patterns, I mean there was a troll fishery for fraser river fish for 90 years...

    P.S. 35 dollar ferry from homer to seldovia, stay at a B&B with a freezer use a blue and black clouser and keep 2 kings per day for a piece untill the freezer is full...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default here we go again

    mark and theiler cabin I am not saying it is too expensive for most. Just for me because of my situation. I currently live in the bush and commercial halibut fish, also do some subsistance halibut fishing, and subsistance salmon fishing. I have the things I need to get the fish out here so that may be the option I take with them instead, since they could sportfish here. Gets them to see the bush so thats good. For the average guy, I think its a great price.

    For me to pay that when I normally spend 50 days on the ocean fishing in the Bering Sea every summer for money, it just does not make sense for us.

    theilercabin you want to talk about expensive? I pay 6 bucks a gallon of gas, I know expensive.

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    Default reds in salt

    [quote=Brian M;89411]Unless reds are schooled up in a bay, catching them in the salt seems like a nearly impossible proposition. Am I wrong on this? I've never caught one while jigging or trolling...they're plankton eaters, right? As such, they're not a fish to target in the salt unless you're snagging them (Main Bay style).

    I've caught three reds in saltwater in Resurrection Bay in early July while trying to catch silvers. One was on a Coyote spoon (half green/half glow) at 30' on a downrigger, the other two where caught mooching small plug cut herring, 30' to 40' down. I caught two of them at the north end of Cheval Narrows and one at Caines Head.

    We used to catch them in Lake Washington trolling either U-20 flatfish or K-14 Kwikfish on an 18" leader behind a size 0 dodger at a very slow troll. We also used bare colored hooks (green or red, size 4/0) behind the same dodger with the same short leader. Most of this was down via downrigger at depths ranging from 40' (early in the morning) down to about 110' (mid-day).

    I believe the Fraser saltwater trollers use small (2") mini-squids in hot pink. I believe that you could catch sockeys fairly regularly in salt with the mini-squids behind a dodger if you gave it a fair try. I'd set the downrigger at 30' for starters in Resurrection Bay. In cook inlet, I'd watch for jumpers and would set the downrigger at 1/3 to 1/2 of the depth of the water (10 to 15' if the water is 30' deep). Then I'd troll as slowly as possible so that the dodger is weaving from side to side, not rotating. I've been thinking about trying this for some time; just haven't gotten around to it. By the way, chums might hammer this rig too.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    If they are way schooled up they should show up on a sounder too. Sounds like a fun experiment
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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