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Thread: Rigging for Reds

  1. #1
    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
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    Default Rigging for Reds

    This will be my first time fishing for reds and would like to know what is the best way to rig weights on the line. I will be using both casting rod and fly rod, both spooled with 30#. Also will bring a sink tip just to see what works best. Understand you need about 1/2 oz of lead on the Kenai, adjusting depending on current. Is that the correct amount to start with?
    Is it best to use crimp on lead or have heard people mention that they like pencil weights better as they don't snag the bottom as easily. Do you connect main line and lead with a swivel and hook pencil lead to that?
    Also going to go with a 1/0 circle hook to try to reduce snagged fish. Any thoughts on that?

  2. #2
    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    You dont want to sink the tip, you want it to float. I use a three way barrel swivel to tie on the pencil lead and the leader. I cut all my lead and tie a piece of mono to it, forming a loop. Then if i have to change lead out it only takes a second or two with the loop that is already on it.


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  3. #3
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Wherever you fish use just enough weight to bounce on the bottom through the whole drift. I usually use between a 4-6' leader.
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  4. #4
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Split shot are the easiest I think. Sometimes I will use a 3 way with pencil lead.

    Where the lead is, how much of it, and your postion in relation to cast will be the final determination of catching fish (if they are there).

    I haven't heard of anyone using a circle hook - let us know how it works. Different regs for different parts of the river on hook gap etc....read up on them.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I use #2 split shot, as it's easier to change the distance the weight is above the fly and the amount of lead depending on current and bottom conditions.

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    I string my line through 1" of surgical tubing, and use the tubing to secure whatever length of lead wire weight I'm using - typically 3/4" to 1 1/4" of 1/4" wire. This slides easy up and down the line (to vary leader length) and doesn't snag much.

  7. #7
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    For a fly rod I like LED by larvalace.
    Wrap on what you need and you can easily add more or remove some.
    It is basically a flat lead wrap on a small spool so you can put on as much as you need.
    It is more aerodynamic than splitshot. Works good for me.
    I like split shot on a regular rod with mono. Just enough to bump the bottom occasionaly.
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  8. #8
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    I usually use the barrel shapped weights with the rubber twist to hold the line. usually start with 3/8 oz & work up until you can feel it bouncing along he bottom. Attach the weight directly to the line (or use a short dropper of lighter test leader). If you're fishing the Russian, you can get by with split shot. Weight is usually 2-3 feet above the fly. If you're fishing the Russian or the confluence, carefully measure the gap between the point of the hook & the shank (because of the way the point points towards the shank on a circle hook, you may be ok with a 1/0, but measure it).
    Should be an interesting experiment. I'd carry some #4 regular hooks also, just in case.

  9. #9
    Member slimm's Avatar
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    + 1 on the rubber core twist on sinkers, it dont get much easier than that plus there is no line pinch so no damage to your line.
    But you gotta get the good ones, Gremlin brand are by far the best, the cheap ones will slip on ya for sure.

  10. #10
    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
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    I like to use a heavier main line attached to a heavy duty swivel with a long leader. Put the weight above the swivel that way you don't have to worry about the weight sliding and if you snagged or broke off you don't lose everything. A long fly rod is the only way to go and a hard sideways hookset at the end of the drift is not needed. Feel the tap on the bottom, if anything feels different a short hook-set straight up will usually catch the fish in the corner of the mouth. The key is to keep the fishes head up, out of the current. Keep your hook sharp and always check your line for kinks/cuts. Good luck.

  11. #11
    Member oldmil007's Avatar
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    This link was pretty helpful for us when fishing for reds last summer.

    http://outdoorsdirectory.com/activit...sockeye-salmon

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    I string my line through 1" of surgical tubing, and use the tubing to secure whatever length of lead wire weight I'm using - typically 3/4" to 1 1/4" of 1/4" wire. This slides easy up and down the line (to vary leader length) and doesn't snag much.
    I started doing this a few years ago. It works pretty well.

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