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Thread: Shrink Wrap and Wind

  1. #1
    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Default Shrink Wrap and Wind

    My wife and I are in the process of building a house and are trying to decide if we need to dump a bunch of money into building a separate garage stall for the boat or if we can put the money into the house and build the garage later. Where we are moving the winds can howl. My friends place recorded 122mph winds last winter during one of the big Chinooks they got. My question is could I get by with shrink wrapping my boat to protect it from the snow and wind or would winds of this caliber just tear the wrap off the boat? Anyone with experience using shrink wrap for storing boats in high winds?

  2. #2

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    Garage!! You won't be sorry you spent the extra money down the road, plus you'll never add it to the house later. The kids and I camp in the boat during the winter. I completed all of next years projects (oil changes, up grades, etc) during the down time and am ready to go for the shrimp in April. You also have access to the boat for Deer in December if you Re so inclined, or to take advantage of a nice weather window on the sound in Jan/Feb. I don't even unpack the boat when I put it away. Plus, it has got to be better for the motors to be stored in a warm garage. The wrap might work ok, but when those 100 mph winds are howling' in January, I know the boat is A-ok. Boats cost a lot of $$, might as well provide the best protection for your investment. Just my two cents.

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    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    I have been tarping my boat every year for the past 5 and I get about a months worth before I need to re-tie due to wind. This fall I will shrink wrap it. Every boat I see that has it done still has it in the spring and no one has told me they don't withstand the winds.

    And as propnut says, the best thing is a garage, but for me a garage for a 32' is a bit spendy.
    Tony

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    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    shrik wrap will hold up if done properly. I used it for several years in Seldovia. Then went to a Cover-it building , now its in the garage. All three worked OK. The cover-it needs to be watched and snow knocked off if it starts to build up but we get 60-70 mph wind there and it stood for 7-8 years. The cover went bad and I took down the frame and now have a garage. A friend of mine shrunk wraped his cover-it when the cover wore out and its made it thru last year just fine. I think the shrink plastic is better than the orig. cover, smoother for shedding snow. Next winter I will have a bigger boat and will shrink wrap it. Guess its all in the effort to do what ever you do right. The garage is the easiest by far, no damage, no worry.

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    Member pacific23's Avatar
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    I would go for the Shop/Garage detached from the house, just make it PLENTY big for all your toys.

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    The biggest and best selling point of an Alaskan house is definitely a garage for the boat (or boat condo). That single addition will mean when the day comes to sell and move that the first person who is serious will buy your house.

    Shrink wrap holds up incredibly well and is strong enough, but at least here in Southeast boat shrink wrapping is about $700 for a boat like yours (annually) and it prevents you from doing mid-winter boating (may not be an issue). Here in Juneau there is boating year round but a lot of people shrink wrap.

    Just today (June 1st) there is a guy down the street who hasn't unwrapped his new OceanPro!

    Sobie2

  7. #7
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    My BIL is in the process of building a boat stable for a guy down in Kenai right now to house a 28' king fisher. The guy elected to go with it for all the reasons mentioned. I also had a shop built last year and spend nearly as much time in it as I do the house! We didn't get it done in time for the boat to get inside but it has spent it's last year under a tarp and I will have time and space to replace the floorboards and make some other mods next winter.

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the replys and I certainly agree with the perspective to build a garage. As propnut and I talked about on the water a couple weeks ago the advantages are huge and really make the boat a useable space during the winter. Between that, the ability to work on it over winter, and it being kept inside out of the weather, a garage has a huge advantage. That being said it runs about $60/square foot to build a garage which would add $20K to the price of our house. Something would have to give to make this happen. Also, I'd have to build it big enough to house a bigger boat. I'm sure we'll eventually upgrade to something that would fit our family better so in order for me to justify the expense I'd have to build it to fit such a boat in the future. I know you guys have a lot of ideas so if you can think of anyway to get something done for cheaper I'd be all ears.

    Thanks again for the help.

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    Member akdeweyj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by algonquin View Post
    shrik wrap will hold up if done properly. I used it for several years in Seldovia. Then went to a Cover-it building , now its in the garage. All three worked OK. The cover-it needs to be watched and snow knocked off if it starts to build up but we get 60-70 mph wind there and it stood for 7-8 years. The cover went bad and I took down the frame and now have a garage. A friend of mine shrunk wraped his cover-it when the cover wore out and its made it thru last year just fine. I think the shrink plastic is better than the orig. cover, smoother for shedding snow. Next winter I will have a bigger boat and will shrink wrap it. Guess its all in the effort to do what ever you do right. The garage is the easiest by far, no damage, no worry.
    I don't want to hijack the thread, but what did you do with the frame for your Cover-it building?
    2007 24ft NorthRiver OS
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    have you look into metal span buildng?

  11. #11
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Do you have time to build it yourself? Pole frame it, wrap it with 2x6 on 2' centers, cover that with plywood, buy or build trusses, plywood (or osb/waferwood) the roof, put on metal roofing. You can pour concrete later if you need to wait for that expense, same with siding to match your house. Oh, yeah, you will need to grade it and put gravel down and tamp it with a rental whacker. No need for excavation or footings etc. with pole frame. You can do this for about $20/sqft I bet. Make it twice as big as you think you need if you can...if you can't, get the width you need/want and then just add to length later...if you are financing the house, I wouldn't think that $20K at today's mortgage rates at 4% or less would add much to the monthly....less than a hundred bucks a month vs $750 to shrink wrap once???

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    My wife and I are in the process of building a house and are trying to decide if we need to dump a bunch of money into building a separate garage stall for the boat or if we can put the money into the house and build the garage later. Where we are moving the winds can howl. My friends place recorded 122mph winds last winter during one of the big Chinooks they got. My question is could I get by with shrink wrapping my boat to protect it from the snow and wind or would winds of this caliber just tear the wrap off the boat? Anyone with experience using shrink wrap for storing boats in high winds?
    I have the shop and I have two neighbors with shrink wrapped boats. The shrink wrap appears to be just fine and we live in the high wind side of Anchorage. The benefit with the shop or garage is that it makes winterizing a little easier and gives me time/place to work on the boat during the winter. You can PM me if you want to see what I have done with my shop.

  13. #13
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    If your going to go the cover route here's what i did, i made a plastic pipe frame and cover it with a tarp, i live in Palmer and it howls here a lot during the winter, the secret to keeping it all together is a cover made out of seine netting it holds everything down and tight and the snow still slides off. I've used the same frame & netting since 1998 only bought tarps.
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    Default shrinkwrap

    Hi I do some shrink wrapping as a side biz and have had no one tell me that they have had problems with the wind blowing it off. I have had a couple people come to me after their home structure blow off and damaged their boat though.
    cheers

    alaskamobileshrinkwrap.com

  15. #15
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
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    Actually, I have a pvc frame and tarp much like Steve-Potbuilder does, been using the same industrial tarp for the last 11 years, this may be the last though, sun and wind finally getting to it. While I still champion the shop (my boat is at a friends, hence the frame and tarp), this works great and gives you the advantage that if you wanted to, you can still get in there and work on the boat, or hang out, which you cannot do with shrink wrap. Also, if you have to put your boat away a little wet, you leave the ends open for air circulation. On my old boat, I wrapped it tight, then had a lot of green stuff growing inside...so don't shrink wrap unless your boat is completely dry! You have to make your frame custom fit your boat, not that hard. The PVC is very light and easy to get off if you remember to design it in sections so you don't have to try to lift the entire frame. Mine is on a Hewes 26' Alaskan, and if you want to see pics, I'll take some on July 1 when I am there, so PM me.

  16. #16

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    Same pvc/tarp setup for mine, too.

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