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Thread: My salmon compost experiment

  1. #1
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Default My salmon compost experiment

    Got brave & emptied the compost bin that I put the salmon carcasses in.
    I was impressed, it didn't stink. There were a few spots that had some odor but barely noticeable.
    I thought I'd find jaw bones & allot of fish skeletons, but all I found was a few gill plates & a few fins.
    I did find a few spine bones, but they were soft & crushed like when get when you can salmon.
    All in all, it came out pretty good.
    Spreading it on some of the garden soil boxes, a few flower beds & will mix some in the "done compost" bin.
    Will have to compare growth with the garden compost.
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  2. #2
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    How did you keep the smell down when you initially put them in?
    If you could keep from attracting animals and keep the smell to a minimum I think this would be good.

  3. #3
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    The fish was mixed in with horse manure compost, covered with it pretty good.
    Then I completely covered it with plastic.

  4. #4
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    Hi, I'm a new member visiting Alaska in late August. Stumbled upon your posts and was reminded about something that I did over a decade ago when I lived in Rochester, NY. (I now live in Dallas). There is a salmon run up the Genesee river every fall. The salmon are stocked and can only go upstream to the first obstruction where anglers 'snatch' or snag them with treble hooks. Not very sporting, I know, but the fish are about to die anyway. I manages to get two 30 pounders which I buried about 2 feet deep in my garden, carefully marking their position. In late May of the following year, when tomato plants are put in, I plopped a plant over each grave. That year those two tomato plants grew to over 10' tall! I still have pics. Best regards and happy gardening! aebikurt(at)yahoo.com

  5. #5
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Been composting salmon parts, shrimp carcasses, and halibut remnants for the last few years myself. Hardly anything left the next year as Mud stated above. To keep the smell down, just bury it a foot or so deep in the compost pile.
    Works like a charm and makes some nice rich black dirt for the next year.
    BK

  6. #6
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    Years ago, when we lived on the coast in South Central, I went to the local processor/cannery and took home a couple of large drum liners with as much salmon entrails and fish waste from the slime line as the bags would carry without ripping the bottoms out.

    I tilled them directly into the garden with a rototiller and a very limited amount of some dolomite lime.

    The F&G folks were live-trappng brown bears a couple blocks from where we lived to move them away from the subdivision, but I never had any bears visit the yard or garden (that I saw evidence of, anyway), and there was no noticeable odor that I detected, either.

    Good stuff, if you can either produce enough of your own, or find a processor that wil allow you access to some of their waste.

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