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Thread: Where to buy .358 caliber 250 gr. Rem. Core-lokts?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Where to buy .358 caliber 250 gr. Rem. Core-lokts?

    I've been searchin n searchin. I can't find anyplace the sells them. Anyone know of a place that sells em?

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I give up.....they aint for sale anywhere! It's alright though, I have some 286 grain 9.3 (.366") Roundnosed Woodleighs that are actually shorter than .358" 250 grain Speer Hot Cor spitzers.

    I'm going to run them through my .358" sizer die, and touch up the noses until each one weighs 285 grains. Inside of 300 yds. there aint much difference between a round nose and a spitzer anyways, might as well free up some powder space and run a big round-nosed bullet.

    Resizing will be simple as could be, they only need to be swaged down .008"

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    You could try Hawk bullets http://www.hawkbullets.com/Pricelist.htm but I could not get good accuacy with the 250gr I tried in my Ruger Hawkeye 358Win, of course that could have been because of my handloads.
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    You could try Hawk bullets http://www.hawkbullets.com/Pricelist.htm but I could not get good accuacy with the 250gr I tried in my Ruger Hawkeye 358Win, of course that could have been because of my handloads.
    They probably didn't shoot good because they anneal the crap out of em and they're overly soft. I also read on another forum where the guy suffered a severe eye injury using hawk bullets. The bullet came apart in the chamber. Ever since I read that, I was a bit weary.

    Here's some pictures of how they failed and separated from the core:

    https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbth...pics/2512804/2

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Here's the guy (Tod Bartell) from B.C., Canada, he has a life long eye injury because of Hawk bullets:

    http://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthr...ue#Post2281035

    I'll pass on unbonded, overly soft bullets with an open hole in the base that exposes the lead.

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    HDS in ORoville has lots of stuff Remington, worth a call...otherwise surf the gun sites.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Why not just use speer or hornady 250's?
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Why not just use speer or hornady 250's?
    For a while, I've been shooting mostly 250 grain hot cors and hornday bullets. I'm wanting to take the 358 Winchester a bit beyond 250 grains.

    The best way to do this in a 308 sized case, is to go with a roundnosed bullet. They put more weight up front. Inside of 300 yds, you wouldn't notice the difference as compared to a 250 grain spitzer.

    I have shot the double tap 310 grain woodleighs through the 358 Winchester and although it was a bit slow, it was quite the combo. I always thought that a .358 roundnosed bullet somewhere between 270-285 grains is the perfect heavy-for-caliber bullet for the .358 Winchester because it'll take up no more powder capacity than a 250 grain spitzer.

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    Mainer, the Hornady 250 RN has a reputation for higher velocity than any other 250 grain bullet, because of it's short bearing surface. It might be the optimum jacketed heavy for the 358 WCF.

    If you would consider cast bullets, read this great article by Paco Kelly, with loads for a 290 gr cast lead GC bullet:

    http://www.leverguns.com/articles/paco/358_wcf.htm

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    Hope you find what you are looking for. If you do come up with something you like, post info about it, I am interested.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Honestly I think in the 358 win going beyond 250 gr is a point of diminishing returns. A 250 gr can be launched at 2200-2300 fps. With a 200 yd zero you should still be in the vitals out to 250yds. I don't have any balistic charts with me, but figure the bullet will be doing around 1700 fps at that range. 1700 is generally the minimum velocity at which cup/core bullets consistantly expand. Hence going to a heavier bullet and lower muzzle velocity is going to reduce the range at which the bullet is going to reliably expand, not to mention your trajectory will be more arched so you have to deal with hold over or mildot scope or turrets beyond 200yds. The 358 win is a great round, but to my way of thinking it's a 250 yd rd and going to heavier bullets won't extend it's range or make it a more effective on game.

    Hornady did used to make a 275 gr rn bullet, and swift makes a 280 gr A-frame, but to my way of thinking those bullets are more geared towards the 358 Norma.

    BTW, I do have a lyman 3589 mold that drops a ~285 gr rn bullet that might be interesting out of the 358 win. I've always thought of cast bullets as being at their best at 2000-2200 fps out of a rifle, and that should be right at what the 358 win is capable of.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Nothing expands like a round nosed bullet, and nothing expands a bullet at such a wide range of velocity like a moose. I don't think a 270-286 grain round nosed bullet is too heavy for a 358. I hope to achieve 2,300 fps. It'll be plenty within 300 yds.

    I did look at the Swift 280 grain A-frame, but I feel it's too long for the little 358 case. I'll let yah folks know how it works out. When I shot my caribou at 150 yds, both bullets expanded and exited the cow. These were Nosler Custom Ammo loaded with Partitions that only gave me 2,220 fps from the muzzle (chrony verified). The impact velocity was probably around 2000 fps. If the ole partition would expand, the Woodleigh 286 grain round nose should too, with it's slightly thinner jacket.

    Please keep in mind, the 9.3x62 Mauser had quite the reputation for effective killing power on all species of African game starting 107 years ago. Back then, the cartridges weren't loaded to the velocities we can achieve today. With the 358 Winchester, inside of 300 yds, I will loose nothing by going to a Roundnose 285 grain bullet that is shorter than a 250 grain spitzer. 2,300 fps from the bullet is not out of the question, it's entirely possible to achieve this level of velocity(safely) with load development.

    We need to quit viewing bullet expansion from a lower-48 deer hunting mentality. Moose, large bears, and Caribou are far bigger critters. On a 178 yard shot, a small bull moose destroyed a hornady 200 grain spizer bullet fired from my 358 Winchester. It peeled back to the base, and shed it's core. That impact velocity couldn't have been that fast.

    My experiences have sculpted my preferences. I very rarely purchase factory ammunition, nor do I ever follow a reloading manual with my odd-ball caliber choices. I like to see a cartridge's full potential achieved, and I will always have a major preference towards heavy-for caliber bullets.

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