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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Default Hopefully...

    you guys had as much fun as i did out there this spring!

    my first hunt was with a return client of ours that was on his fourth brown bear hunt with me. we were a bit early and the weather was hit and miss, but i was able to find a nice boar just emerging from his den on day seven...i've always wanted to watch one actually kick the door down...didnt this time, but it was close! he'd just stuck his head out when i found him from a high vantage a couple miles away...he was groggy when we got to him and the wind hit my back just as we close the distance to a little over a hundred yards. he had just turned to bail when shane hit him the first time. he stopped moving 14 shots later. one of the toughest bears i've been a part of taking. i didnt need to shoot until my client ran out of bullets at 12 shots. two more made him quit getting up...some of them flop right over...this one wasnt one of those bears. the first shot was a bit low, and might have missed the heart, the third shot broke his hips enabling my client to keep shooting without my assistance until he ran out of bullets. this one just kept getting up! not just rolling and moving, but GETTING UP with multiple shots through the chest and a completely broken pelvis bone...tough.

    this was shanes third boar with me that squared nine foot or better with one going 10'1 in the spring of 2009....the guy likes to bear hunt, and is a very humble, hard working, hunter. a joy to guide. i'll be taking the next generation of swiderski hunters on a bear hunt next year as his oldest son turns of age....kinda neat.

    a bruiser of an old boar, and hard to beat in the country we hunt...high 27s on the skull (havent sealed him yet, but should got over 27 and a half) probably the oldest brown bear i've seen on the ground. the sharp ridge indicative of a young bear on the back of the canines was completely gone. this ridge gets worn down as a bear (apparently african lions are similiar in this regard from my research) ages and matures. until now i'd never seen on that was completely smooth with no indication there was ever a ridge there at all. neat old warrior with half a lip missing and one big canine completely broken and embedded in his lip. looked to have been healed for years (just a guess) but no doubt produced a dandy headache...if bears are aware of such things. i've got a hunch that there tolerance to pain is fairly high, and wonder often how much it really effects them.

    a couple pics...DSC00404.jpgDSC00408.jpg

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    DSC00411.jpghis foot...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Fantastic! I'm eagerly awaiting the story of the next hunter. In the meantime, congratulations to you and the hunter, and thanks for sharing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ninefoot View Post
    he stopped moving 14 shots later.
    Interesting story, allright.

    Hope yer season carry's on with more sucsess.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    thanks brian and chip! but i'm done. just got back to civilization yesterday after about 24 days in the field. it was a rewarding season, and i enjoyed it immensely. the second hunt went just as well, and you can read a mini write up of it on the cabelas thread i just posted.

    you sound skeptical stranger...i know i know...but someday if i ever get up to the kobuk country and do some wandering around, i'll bring the video i took of the beating that bear took. my thoughts are that the first shot indeed missed the heart a touch low, (did however break the off-side forleg) and in my experience, the instances where bears are seemingly so hard to kill usually have one thing in common...a non vital first shot. *grins* no doubt you'da prevented such nonsense with a simple pill to the back of the ol monarchs melon piling him in a heep with your trapping gun or such...and such a feat coulda been easily accomplished by a calm cool headed shot from a guy that kills to eat...such a guy has not found his way to one of my camps as of yet and as we both know, proly never will, or even have a desire to. plus we like those big noggins...i know i know, wierd critters some of us hunters. i hope your neck of the northwest is getting the beautifull weather we're enjoying here, and that your lifestyle and subsistnece season is cruising right along at the pace you and your unique family wish it to...

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Zack you need to change your name to 9+' pretty soon
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Well Zack, its good to know your doing fine. Were all fine here, weathers nice too.

    14 shots is notable, dont you think? But you have to do what you have to do to get the job done, despite any number, and doing so is noticable, as is your honesty about 'just what it took' to get that job done.

    I'm no critc, and if I had to, I too would shoot till it fell over, as I do, and you never know what tomorrow will bring or how a Hunt will turn out.

    Good luck, looking forward to more!
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Wow judging from that hole in your pants you musta got REALLY excited when you saw that bear! Ha Ha just kidding, I blew out my sitkas in the same spot, sent em back to them and they repaired them free of charge.

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helidriver72 View Post
    Wow judging from that hole in your pants you musta got REALLY excited when you saw that bear! Ha Ha just kidding, I blew out my sitkas in the same spot, sent em back to them and they repaired them free of charge.
    lol...yeah the bane of a big guy i guess. every frickin pair of ascents i've had has done that, not to mention jeans my entire life, i still like em though, my favorite hunting pant so far...i usually just get a couple seasons outta a pair so my program consists of hand sowin em with dental floss and a needle i keep with me. i suppose this kodak moment caught me unawares though...obviously. lol...good eye there helidriver.

  10. #10

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    GREAT INFO

    GREAT INFO - FANTESTIC BEAR! surprised not more blood after 12 shoots?
    thnks for posting
    wes
    Quote Originally Posted by ninefoot View Post
    you guys had as much fun as i did out there this spring!

    my first hunt was with a return client of ours that was on his fourth brown bear hunt with me. we were a bit early and the weather was hit and miss, but i was able to find a nice boar just emerging from his den on day seven...i've always wanted to watch one actually kick the door down...didnt this time, but it was close! he'd just stuck his head out when i found him from a high vantage a couple miles away...he was groggy when we got to him and the wind hit my back just as we close the distance to a little over a hundred yards. he had just turned to bail when shane hit him the first time. he stopped moving 14 shots later. one of the toughest bears i've been a part of taking. i didnt need to shoot until my client ran out of bullets at 12 shots. two more made him quit getting up...some of them flop right over...this one wasnt one of those bears. the first shot was a bit low, and might have missed the heart, the third shot broke his hips enabling my client to keep shooting without my assistance until he ran out of bullets. this one just kept getting up! not just rolling and moving, but GETTING UP with multiple shots through the chest and a completely broken pelvis bone...tough.

    this was shanes third boar with me that squared nine foot or better with one going 10'1 in the spring of 2009....the guy likes to bear hunt, and is a very humble, hard working, hunter. a joy to guide. i'll be taking the next generation of swiderski hunters on a bear hunt next year as his oldest son turns of age....kinda neat.

    a bruiser of an old boar, and hard to beat in the country we hunt...high 27s on the skull (havent sealed him yet, but should got over 27 and a half) probably the oldest brown bear i've seen on the ground. the sharp ridge indicative of a young bear on the back of the canines was completely gone. this ridge gets worn down as a bear (apparently african lions are similiar in this regard from my research) ages and matures. until now i'd never seen on that was completely smooth with no indication there was ever a ridge there at all. neat old warrior with half a lip missing and one big canine completely broken and embedded in his lip. looked to have been healed for years (just a guess) but no doubt produced a dandy headache...if bears are aware of such things. i've got a hunch that there tolerance to pain is fairly high, and wonder often how much it really effects them.

    a couple pics...DSC00404.jpgDSC00408.jpg

  11. #11
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    Well Zack, its good to know your doing fine. Were all fine here, weathers nice too.

    14 shots is notable, dont you think? But you have to do what you have to do to get the job done, despite any number, and doing so is noticable, as is your honesty about 'just what it took' to get that job done.

    I'm no critc, and if I had to, I too would shoot till it fell over, as I do, and you never know what tomorrow will bring or how a Hunt will turn out.

    Good luck, looking forward to more!
    good to hear it chip...and yep, i do think that 14 shots is notable....and frankly, sounds kinda rediculous...thats definitely why i included that part of the story. my client seemed convinced that he might have just been tougher than normal due to the scars and such, his thinking that was the reasoning for the bears lack of proper reaction to his many well placed shots after the initial few that werent vital (though the hip/pelvis shot is pretty impressive, its like someone tossed the anchor out: the bear did lots of getting up and moving, but he wasnt able to get anywhere quick)...that theory very well may be the case, i suppose...but i tend to think a quicker outcome might have been reached had the first shot penetrated the lower half of both lungs. leaves a guy to wander though. had the situation been different and brushier and without the great amount of room we had to work with then i would have had a very live bear on my hands when i went in to find him....and i know one things for certain: to quote an old guide i have lots of respect for..."i'm pretty ****ed fond of my wifes husband": so i'd rather get it all done right out in the open so i dont have to find out how tough he really is.


    on brown/grizzly meat: was wondering for a while just never got round to asking ya: your northwest bears are getting some fish in the fall correct? how do you get around the fish smell? even in the spring? i've skinned average sized and small bears that smelled very clean, in fact much cleaner than a moose. i could see myself giving that meat a shot. and definitely in salmonless areas of the arctic and interior the same can be found....but lots of our bigger boars that are taken in the spring smell just as fishy as when you skin one in the fall...hell it takes me a month just to wear that stuff off all my gear, and thats after numerous washings. i tried some backstrap once with a client and man the old fish smell and taste just couldnt be avoided...just wondering, cause i knew that you indeed enjoyed brown/grizz as table fare, and was wondering if it has more to do with location, or a certain way you were preparing/cooking it. just curious, as always. i realize your pretty far north for what most consider fish bears, but i also realize that theres plenty of salmon up in some parts of your country right?
    inquiring minds and all that...zack

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesleyM1990 View Post
    GREAT INFO

    GREAT INFO - FANTESTIC BEAR! surprised not more blood after 12 shoots?
    thnks for posting
    wes
    thanks wes....and yeah i was waitin for someone to catch that...a little effort was taken to get him down the hill a bit, and out of the gore, something that i always try to do, you can only take pictures once, and with a little effort (especially on a snow backdrop) a guy can eliminate the "murder scene" look from his photos.

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    To answer yer question about the fish, the farther North you are , the earlier the rivers freeze up and the Bears stop eating them, and den up, perhaps longer than southern Bears. Freeze up is late Sept/early Oct. Bears come out in early April, with a few in late March, if theres quite a warm up. Our rivers are still frozen, although slewed with water, and our break up isnt far away.......I think vegetation and Berry's are in more of their diet than the southern Browns, but thats a guess.
    Then , again, we do have 375,000 Caribou hanging around, Lots of Ox and too many Moose....Im sure the Bears feed on these fellas as well, and could be a mellower taste in them.....
    Here in the Arctic, there is no fish kinda taste to be found in Brown Bear meat in Spring, and the fats render to near tasteless, and make perfect cooing oil. Alot of guys think the meats taste is pretty close to roast Goose.
    Roast is my favorite way to make Brown Bear , or boiled and stewed with veggies......

    As well, I do prefer younger Bears, but the body condition and amount of Fat are my determining factors when I size them up.


    Later in the year, Salmon up the rivers and dead Whales, Seals and float ups feed the Bears along the Oceans coast, so if you catch a Fall Bear here, the taste of fish and general "YUK!"
    is most likely there. Maybe Southwest Browns are scavenging winter frozen Salmon along the banks?

    I only hunt Brown Bears in the Spring, for the meats and fat, because of the lack of strong taste, or I wouldn't hunt them actively.
    When handling Bears or other meats in general, I only get 'dirty' to my wrists. I get it home and the wife will butcher and distribute my catch, and this Spring it was gone quick. She wears the same rain gear for Bears as shes does butchering Seals, and , of course, her Fish cutting all summer.........and I know of no 'cure' for the smell ~~LOL!!~~

    Good photos, by the way!
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  14. #14
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    To answer yer question about the fish, the farther North you are , the earlier the rivers freeze up and the Bears stop eating them, and den up, perhaps longer than southern Bears. Freeze up is late Sept/early Oct. Bears come out in early April, with a few in late March, if theres quite a warm up. Our rivers are still frozen, although slewed with water, and our break up isnt far away.......I think vegetation and Berry's are in more of their diet than the southern Browns, but thats a guess.
    Then , again, we do have 375,000 Caribou hanging around, Lots of Ox and too many Moose....Im sure the Bears feed on these fellas as well, and could be a mellower taste in them.....
    Here in the Arctic, there is no fish kinda taste to be found in Brown Bear meat in Spring, and the fats render to near tasteless, and make perfect cooing oil. Alot of guys think the meats taste is pretty close to roast Goose.
    Roast is my favorite way to make Brown Bear , or boiled and stewed with veggies......

    As well, I do prefer younger Bears, but the body condition and amount of Fat are my determining factors when I size them up.


    Later in the year, Salmon up the rivers and dead Whales, Seals and float ups feed the Bears along the Oceans coast, so if you catch a Fall Bear here, the taste of fish and general "YUK!"
    is most likely there. Maybe Southwest Browns are scavenging winter frozen Salmon along the banks?

    I only hunt Brown Bears in the Spring, for the meats and fat, because of the lack of strong taste, or I wouldn't hunt them actively.
    When handling Bears or other meats in general, I only get 'dirty' to my wrists. I get it home and the wife will butcher and distribute my catch, and this Spring it was gone quick. She wears the same rain gear for Bears as shes does butchering Seals, and , of course, her Fish cutting all summer.........and I know of no 'cure' for the smell ~~LOL!!~~

    Good photos, by the way!
    was not considering the vast difference in timeing of freeze up....that makes perfect sense to me. our coastal bears are literally eating fish until they dig in, so without a few weeks in the berries and or on red meat or what not to clear the fish, it makes perfect sense that it'll still be prevalent in the spring when they emerge. thanx for the reply...was always wondering how in the world anyone could deem a bruin in that condition edible. but have definitely skinned and smelled non fishy bears that i'd have little qualms in eating. bums me out you gotta cook it so long though, i'm a fan of meat on the rarer side. anywho, thanx for the reply chip.

    lol, by the way: ya think our wives could get together and talk of womens duties...yours definitely seems to have gotten the memo!...mine, not so much. lol.......

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Notice his claws look worn. Aren't spring bears supposed to have long claws? Maybe he had to serious dig to get out of the den?
    Nice bear.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    Notice his claws look worn. Aren't spring bears supposed to have long claws? Maybe he had to serious dig to get out of the den?
    Nice bear.
    ya know mt, i dont know why this particular one didnt have the normal spring claws....a guy would think that they'd grow long in the den as do nails when not in use...but his were shorter than average i'd say...and very thick. an old time guide i respect very much says that coloration (the old white claws mean old bears adage) dont mean much, but that older bears have noticeably thicker claws...this has proven true in my experience and is easy to understand as soon as you take a look at there giant toes. i've yeat to take a big boy with truly white claws, but have seen them on both sows and one younger boar i'm thinking of. an old wives tale so far in my experience. dont have any explanation for the relatively short claws on this guy though, as he'd just started to wake up when we killed him. definitely hadnt done any digging yet for sure...i'll post a pic of his den:DSC00414.jpg

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    Congrats.
    Wes

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    Next time you try bear, use a food thermometer and bring internal temp to 145, rest it 3 minutes and eat. Its following the same guidelines as for pork. It doesn't have to be cooked to Sahara dryness to kill off any nasties, and if its a good bear, the meat will be terrific.

  19. #19
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Default so just finished talking...

    with two local biologists and learned a few things regarding bears that i found interesting and that makes sense. thought i'd share for anyone that cares about such things:

    so i was taught five years ago when i started working for my current boss that an indication of age (without pulling the tooth and getting an accurate lab result) could be obtained by looking at the ridge on the back on the big canine teeth. with young bears this ridge is sharp and very pronounced, with older bears its much more worn, and as i mentioned in this thread shanes bear this spring had zero indication of ever having a ridge at all....but, heres what i learned today that makes sense: the bios dont look much at the ridge on older more mature bears because of the simple fact that some are just really hard on their teeth throughout life, and that a bear could loose that ridge just from being hard on themselves as opposed to being really old. they look much closer at the wear on the back teeth instead.

    also learned that food source has a huge impact on teeth wear as well. for instance lots of people have observed bears eating horestail, a common vegetation with good nutritional value...turns out horsetail has silica in it. silica is very abrasive, leading to teeth wear that has nothing at all to do with aging.

    another example that explains middle aged bears and younger bears that have huge cavernous cavities in there back teeth is really simple and has to do with food source as well. something that i cant beleive i hadnt thought of before. theyre just an animal after all, and we're talking about teeth, just big examples of the same kind of teeth found on lots of mammals. simple: berries. and the tons of sugar that are in them. just like a young adult human thats had a sweet tooth his whole life and doesnt brush his teeth. sugar makes cavitites. fairly common sense logic. i'm sure the bio could see the light bulb hovering over my underarmor cap as he was telling me things i shoulda figured out myself....one of those "duh" moments.

    so, the ridge at the back of the canine is definitely an indicator of age to a certain extent, but could be better used as a guideline after knowing the predominant food sources the bears your hunting are using, what vegetation is available, how predatory the pop is etc etc etc...in general anyway. with bears its so hard to think in general terms because of theyre individual ability to learn...meaning that in any bear population theres a percentage of the population that learns traits and skills during there lives that enables them to get enough food to grow to immense sizes...for example the odd giant nine plus interior bears that find ways to grow so much larger than the majority of the population around them without the help of huge fish runs and short winters their coastal cousins enjoy. that to me doesnt have a whole lot to do with genetics, but more to do with learned traits throughout there lives that enable them to find more protein than normal. this trait about bears is kinda unique and just one of the many reasons they continue to fascinate me.

    both bios were more concerned with shanes bears rear teeth and both guessed him to be over twenty. so i was thinking similiarly, but not using all the indicators that were clearly there. i learned something. i like that. anyway...thought i'd share something i learned today.

    now it will be interesting to see the lab results and know the real answer.

  20. #20

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    9', thanks for the pics, story, and info.


    Fred

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