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Thread: Who's planted their outdoor garden?

  1. #1
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Who's planted their outdoor garden?

    I went ahead and put my starters in the ground last week, hope I wasn't too early. So far so go though. Planted potatos about 2 weeks ago and Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, onions a week ago Friday. Typically I wait until after this weekend, but decided to do it a little early this year. Has anyone else planted?
    IMG_0222.jpgIMG_0228.jpg

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    Member Kotton's Avatar
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    I'm another that started early,I think we will be good, already have seeds popping up in the beds and my starts are still kicking it.The green house is doing great!Trying some new things this year just hope they grow!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Thursday was planting out day for us. I got my starts going about a week later than I'd prefer this year, so they're not quite as bit as I'd like. I hardened them off for a week, though, so I'm feeling pretty good about putting them out now. Lowenfels always says that when the birch leaves are as big as a squirrel's ear that it's safe to plant outdoors, so here we go. We had a frost at my house a little over a week ago, but all seems good now.









    We're also starting our next garden expansion project. I've got lots of digging and leveling to do, but we wanted to lay the blocks out to get a feel for size and shape. It'll be raspberries in that back section and then a mixture of peas, beets, and much else in the E-shaped section. I was hoping to get that going by this next week, but I'm home alone with my two little ones for a few days and an unable to get anything done. These guys wear me out!


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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    90 percent planted.
    Just put the last Zucchini in today.
    I have a few more seeds to plant & will be planting more lettuce every 2 weeks
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    I know I can't see it all, but that looks to be one sweet garden area ya got there mudbuddy. Are you planting your Zucc's in the green house? I've only tried growing them once outside, with no luck.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Have grown them out in the garden for 30 years. Except for real rainy years they do well.
    Rainy years I cove them so the blooms don't drown.
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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    I planted 90% of my garden seeds directly into my garden planters on the 16th. Some of those I covered with Visqueen and the extra heat did great things. I set out most of my Starter plants on the 17th and followed up with the remainder about 4 days later.
    Last week (abouit the 21st I moved my Cucumbers into the Green house. Last week I discoverd a couple of my Tomatoe plants are infested with spider mites so we've been fighting them with a soap/water solution. I don't know if we're winning that battle or not, but... my hands are pretty clean now. This morning I noticed my Peas are beginning to pop up, so the last day or so of drizzle and now todays sunshine they should show excellent progress by this afternoon.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Thursday was planting out day for us. I got my starts going about a week later than I'd prefer this year, so they're not quite as bit as I'd like. I hardened them off for a week, though, so I'm feeling pretty good about putting them out now. Lowenfels always says that when the birch leaves are as big as a squirrel's ear that it's safe to plant outdoors, so here we go. We had a frost at my house a little over a week ago, but all seems good now.


    We're also starting our next garden expansion project. I've got lots of digging and leveling to do, but we wanted to lay the blocks out to get a feel for size and shape. It'll be raspberries in that back section and then a mixture of peas, beets, and much else in the E-shaped section. I was hoping to get that going by this next week, but I'm home alone with my two little ones for a few days and an unable to get anything done. These guys wear me out!
    Suggestion: Rain gutter & a 55 gallon drum to catch the water & use it for watering. To wet is worse than to dry

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Have grown them out in the garden for 30 years. Except for real rainy years they do well.
    Rainy years I cove them so the blooms don't drown.
    Makes me think that maybe I should give another try. The year that I did try was '08, one of our wetest/coldest summers on record, and probably the worst summer to try and grow zucchini.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    IMG_0940.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    I know I can't see it all, but that looks to be one sweet garden area ya got there mudbuddy. Are you planting your Zucc's in the green house? I've only tried growing them once outside, with no luck.
    A year ago I accepted an invite from Mudbuddy to go over to his place and look at his green house and his garden ...
    I came home and built a little green house to grow cucumbers and tomatoes, and I began buying lumber and making garden beds copied off of his sizes and shapes. Converting my old fashioned methods into his style. The raised gardens increased my yield quite a bit. The one foot higher beds make it a little easier for an old man to bend over to pull weeds too.! the raised beds make it easier to cut a strip of visqueen and staple it to the side boards, giving the advantage of creating warmer soil for the plants to grow quicker.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    Makes me think that maybe I should give another try. The year that I did try was '08, one of our wetest/coldest summers on record, and probably the worst summer to try and grow zucchini.
    You also have to hand pollenate them. If no pollenated, the small zucs rot. No bees to do the work.
    Small paintbrush, get pollen from a male bloom & put it on the female bloom. (& hope she smiles )

  12. #12
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Thanks John. You've taken it to the next level. Mini green houses over the soil beds


    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    IMG_0940.jpg

    A year ago I accepted an invite from Mudbuddy to go over to his place and look at his green house and his garden ...
    I came home and built a little green house to grow cucumbers and tomatoes, and I began buying lumber and making garden beds copied off of his sizes and shapes. Converting my old fashioned methods into his style. The raised gardens increased my yield quite a bit. The one foot higher beds make it a little easier for an old man to bend over to pull weeds too.! the raised beds make it easier to cut a strip of visqueen and staple it to the side boards, giving the advantage of creating warmer soil for the plants to grow quicker.

  13. #13
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    You also have to hand pollenate them. If no pollenated, the small zucs rot. No bees to do the work.
    Small paintbrush, get pollen from a male bloom & put it on the female bloom. (& hope she smiles )
    Okay, as much as I hate to do it, I have to ask, how do you tell the males from the females? Or do you just take the paint brush and go a couple times around all the flowers?

  14. #14
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Female blooms are on the end of a small zucchini
    Male blooms are just blooms on a stalk.
    Get pollen on the brush from the male (anther), easy to see also, bright yellow.
    Brush the pollen on the stigma nodes in the center of the female flower.

    (same for cucumbers in the GH unless you grow the hybrid types that don't require pollenating usually seedless, like "Sweet success" , Walmart had some )

    A dry or sunny day procedure.

    1st pic Female ........... 2nd pic Male
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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    A thread from a while back about pollenating:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...l=1#post960960

  16. #16
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    I have another question for you mud. How did you get your tires turned inside out? I worked on mine for about 5 min. then said "the hell with it". I just figured that they're in the back yard, and we have no neighbors behind us so it's only me looking at the tread pattern. I have to admit though, being a bit anal retentive, it bugs me looking at the tread, and feeling defeated because I couldn't get them reversed.

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Wow I guess I am way behind. I only have like 10% planted right now.

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    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Default Invert tires

    Cut out on side wall.
    stand on it to get it started & then roll it inside out.
    The more you do, the easier it gets, I fought the first few & now it just seems easy.
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  19. #19
    Member mudbuddy's Avatar
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    Default invert tires

    push the un-rolled part toward the middle & finish inverting .
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