Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31

Thread: knife sharpener

  1. #1
    Member kodiakbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    250

    Default knife sharpener

    Looking to spend some money on a knife sharpener/system. Looking for some pros and cons on what everyone is using to help me narrow down my choices.

    Thanks in advance!
    Experience is a hard teacher because you get the test first and the lesson afterwards.

  2. #2
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,887

    Default

    I personally have and use an Edge Select 120 electric sharpener.
    It works good and I have sharpened many knives with deep nicks in them. Once they are sharp I usually only need to use the third hone stage. It is just a honing stone and works great.
    I also carry a quick sharpener just in case I need it. I prefer the ones with a stone in them.
    I don't like the carbide ones as they tend to remove too much metal for my liking.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  3. #3

  4. #4

    Default

    I use a Cabela's Chef's Choice Sportsman (which looks like it's pretty much the same machine as the Chef's Choice Edge Select 120) electric to sharpen and then on my boat to keep my knives honed I keep one of those handheld gizmos that has the crossed ceramic arms and the carbide thingies on. As kasilofchrisn says, the carbide thingies do take a lot of metal off if you use it too aggressively, but it's a handy thing to have if you need it. Chef's Choice makes a whole bunch of different sharpeners that range from basic to professional.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  5. #5
    Member captaindd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Salcha, AK
    Posts
    762

    Default

    http://www.worksharptools.com/sportsmans-sharpener.html The belt driven knife/tool sharpener from work sharp tools is the best knife sharpener that I have ever used. You can sharpen knifes to a razor sharp edge or use it on axes, ice augers or just about that needs an edge.

  6. #6

    Default

    I have most of the knife sharpeners out there, and the WorkSharp belt sharpener is really quick and easy. My daughter-in-law used it to sharpen one of her cheap kitchen knives shaving sharp in less than a minute. I also have the sanding and buffing wheels which is better maybe but I use the worksharp all the time. Just sharpened a dozen knifes a couple of hours ago.

  7. #7
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    I've tried em all and am sold on ceramic or diamond grit sharpeners. The metal/carbide criss-crossy metal sharpeners, often coming in a hand held shaprener with ceramic sticks on the other side, are death to stainlessblades, they will chip them with little effort! The are OK for softer carbon steel...but unnecessary IMO...I used to work so hard at sharpening with all kinds of angle gadgets till I finally realized that a few light PRECISE strokes are the ticket, not lots of hard, uneven strokes. The hand-helds do the job fine, no need for electrics IMO unless you are in some kind of production system. The ceramics with 1-3 wheels on each side are great, especially with coarse wheels on one side and fine's on the other. I recently got a big diamond grit sharpening "stone" and with a few precise strokes it works great on small knives and fillet knives. Another recent addition is a diamond grit sharpening "steel" from Cabelas, similar to the one that Reel Bob shows above, except that it has a slight taper, and I love it when I am butchering or doing a lot of filleting, just a few strokes frequently keeps a razor edge. Now I just need to convince my wife she could sharpen with one of these
    while I keep working

    Quote Originally Posted by tomfishhunter View Post
    I have most of the knife sharpeners out there, and the WorkSharp belt sharpener is really quick and easy. My daughter-in-law used it to sharpen one of her cheap kitchen knives shaving sharp in less than a minute. I also have the sanding and buffing wheels which is better maybe but I use the worksharp all the time. Just sharpened a dozen knifes a couple of hours ago.

  8. #8
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    12

    Default

    I sharpen knife for extra cash in the homer area and use tru hone knife sharpener. It cost a little bit more but worth it. If you live near homer/anchor point I can let you use it and check it out. 399-0623

  9. #9
    Member AKluvr95's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska
    Posts
    646

    Default

    Diamond Lanskey works for me primarily on hunting knives. I use a small diamond steel for quick touch ups in the field. Believe it or not though, I use the attached sharpener for a quick clean up of fillet knives if blade angles get out of whack ~ they work surprisingly well and only cost a few dollars. Follow up with a few strokes on the steel and voila!!!

    Sharpener.jpg

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakbound View Post
    Looking to spend some money on a knife sharpener/system. Looking for some pros and cons on what everyone is using to help me narrow down my choices.

    Thanks in advance!
    Hey Kevin,

    I'm an old timer on knife sharpening and still just use a big old 3-stone oil bath bench sharpener. They sell them at Kodiak Marine Supply, but they're around $215 plus enuff oil to fill the bath. That much money buys a lot of new-fangled alternatives, many of which are good. You're getting good stuff here, and I can't add to it. I've got a Koch waterbath wheel left over from my cutting days, and it's absolutely killer. But it removes a LOT of steel if you don't know what you're doing and can eat up knives in a hurry. Not a good buy for average use, and at something over $500 as I recall, you don't want to go there anyway. It's great for quickly rebuilding and restoring damaged edges, but precarious for novice use.

    I will pass on one other thing. At the fillet table I always use a steel to touch up my edges, but danged if conventional steels don't rust horribly.

    I found happiness with a Russel/Dexter diamond steel. It's one with the white handle, but the body is flat rather than round. Just dandy, and I keep it in the boat all the time. Kodiak Marine sells them too, for around $20 IIRC. If we ever manage to cross paths on the water again I'll show you mine if you haven't made it to KMS.

    Speaking of which, today looks like Maiden Voyage Day. Bout darned time!

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    I like the 3 stone Lansky for actually putting a good edge on a knife. Then all I usually use is the small diamond steel which I carry almost everywhere. Trick with the diamond is to use it lightly.

  12. #12
    Member Mel Roe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    200

    Default

    I also recommend the work sharp sharpener. It is fast and does a great job sharpening. I have used about every sharpener out there and in my opinion it is the best one I have used.
    Kodiak Island Adventures
    907-539-6474
    Shearwater 38' Allen Marine Catamaran
    Lana J 40' USCG inspected

  13. #13

    Default

    Edge Pro works very well, IMO. I touch up with a ceramic rod.

  14. #14
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,080

    Default

    I have used the 120 electric from edge select, it does well on some knives but will remove more material than I prefer. I have found it to be diffucult to use on my thicker bladed hunting knives. It will make a knife very sharp, however it does so by creating a micro serrated edge. Which is deadly sharp but not as durable as a honed or polished edge.

    The first stage would only be used on a knife that has not been sharpened in a very long while, it is coarse, the middle stage does a nice job fairly quickly. The final stage is used to remove the burr and polish the edge, however it is still serrated to some degree, I have tried to used the final stage to just polish a edge and have found it does not work for that. It seems to me there should be another step for some one that is looking for a fine, long lasting edge.
    I have not been able to locate the "specs" for the grit of the different wheels on the edge select sharpeners.

    IMO, the 120 is fast and ok for some knives, I typically will use on my kitchen and fillet knives, but I am still looking for something better for my fillet knives. Knives used in field need a honed durable edge where as with a kitchen knife I can always walk out to the garage to tune em up.

    On my hunting knives I use traditional arkansas stones, final stage is honing with a black to get it polished, this takes some time and I dont use a guide, you just have to be in the mood, however its quite easy to get the angle off and unequal doing it this way, so every once in a while it might be reasonable to have them done professionally..........I have never paid someone to sharpen my knives......but it might make sense to start out with nice equal angles on both sides.

    In the field I have a folding diamond by dmt? that works ok..........

    here is a good article if you are interested...

    http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?...nd-sharpening/
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  15. #15
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    I have used the 120 electric from edge select, it does well on some knives but will remove more material than I prefer. I have found it to be diffucult to use on my thicker bladed hunting knives. It will make a knife very sharp, however it does so by creating a micro serrated edge. Which is deadly sharp but not as durable as a honed or polished edge.

    The first stage would only be used on a knife that has not been sharpened in a very long while, it is coarse, the middle stage does a nice job fairly quickly. The final stage is used to remove the burr and polish the edge, however it is still serrated to some degree, I have tried to used the final stage to just polish a edge and have found it does not work for that. It seems to me there should be another step for some one that is looking for a fine, long lasting edge.
    I have not been able to locate the "specs" for the grit of the different wheels on the edge select sharpeners.

    IMO, the 120 is fast and ok for some knives, I typically will use on my kitchen and fillet knives, but I am still looking for something better for my fillet knives. Knives used in field need a honed durable edge where as with a kitchen knife I can always walk out to the garage to tune em up.

    On my hunting knives I use traditional arkansas stones, final stage is honing with a black to get it polished, this takes some time and I dont use a guide, you just have to be in the mood, however its quite easy to get the angle off and unequal doing it this way, so every once in a while it might be reasonable to have them done professionally..........I have never paid someone to sharpen my knives......but it might make sense to start out with nice equal angles on both sides.

    In the field I have a folding diamond by dmt? that works ok..........

    here is a good article if you are interested...

    http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?...nd-sharpening/
    I have never had any issues that you mentioned with my Edge select 120.
    Last year I got some new fillet knives. While they were still brand new I ran them through just the 3rd hone stage on them.
    I did over 20 Halibut at one time with the one knife and did not do anything to the blade the entire time. I am sure it would have done many more fish as well. Since then I have only run them through the hone stage and that works great. I am not sure about the micro serrated thing but I would say that is a pretty good job of holding an edge.
    I have also done some of my Gerber hatchets on mine and it worked good on those as well even though they are thicker than my other knives by a long shot.
    To each his own though.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    I have never had any issues that you mentioned with my Edge select 120.
    Last year I got some new fillet knives. While they were still brand new I ran them through just the 3rd hone stage on them.
    I did over 20 Halibut at one time with the one knife and did not do anything to the blade the entire time. I am sure it would have done many more fish as well. Since then I have only run them through the hone stage and that works great. I am not sure about the micro serrated thing but I would say that is a pretty good job of holding an edge.
    I have also done some of my Gerber hatchets on mine and it worked good on those as well even though they are thicker than my other knives by a long shot.
    To each his own though.
    Yeah, like I said before, I get a beautiful finish on my fillet knives with my Cabela's Chefs Choice Sportsman which appears to be just the non-Cabela's model of the Edge Select 120. When I got it there were instructions with it that said something to the effect that the #1 stone followed by the "honing stone" (skip stone #2) on it will give you a "micro-serrated" edge that works better for some meats and that if you want more of a "razor sharp" edge to use the #2 stone. Though when you come right down to it, even a razor has a "micro-serrated" edge on it if you look at it closely enough. I agree with kasilofchrisn---to each his own.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  17. #17
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Central Kenai Peninsula
    Posts
    4,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    Yeah, like I said before, I get a beautiful finish on my fillet knives with my Cabela's Chefs Choice Sportsman which appears to be just the non-Cabela's model of the Edge Select 120. When I got it there were instructions with it that said something to the effect that the #1 stone followed by the "honing stone" (skip stone #2) on it will give you a "micro-serrated" edge that works better for some meats and that if you want more of a "razor sharp" edge to use the #2 stone. Though when you come right down to it, even a razor has a "micro-serrated" edge on it if you look at it closely enough. I agree with kasilofchrisn---to each his own.

    My dad bought me a Dexter Russell fillet knife last year for Christmas last year and I am really impressed. So impressed I bought a few more. I know you are a fan of their knives as well Dave.
    I think sometimes a good knife makes a bigger difference than the sharpener. I used to use Kewrshaw fillett knives and now only use the Dexter Russells because they hold an edge better.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

  18. #18
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,262

    Default

    I've tried em all over the years, just about everything I've seen or heard. Lansky, work sharp, etc, etc, etc. From filet knives to kitchen knives to my hunting kinves.......................and nothing has come close to the hunter honer. I can get a knife sharp with the others, but that hunter honer without a doubt keeps the blade sharper than any of them. My personal experience is the work sharp belted sharper puts a scary edge on my knives, but they get dull fast. Just my experience.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
    _________________________________________________

    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    My dad bought me a Dexter Russell fillet knife last year for Christmas last year and I am really impressed. So impressed I bought a few more. I know you are a fan of their knives as well Dave.
    I think sometimes a good knife makes a bigger difference than the sharpener. I used to use Kewrshaw fillett knives and now only use the Dexter Russells because they hold an edge better.
    I'm not SURE of this, but I believe Kershaws are stainless steel and Dexters are high carbon steel. High carbon steel is easier to sharpen, but the trade off is they dull easier. But I prefer to be able to keep my knives sharp easily so I'll take the trade off.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  20. #20

    Default

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1337640867.021899.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1337640902.016102.jpg
    I use this $7 device on non-serrated blades and it has never failed me. Got it at Sportsman's Warehouse.
    I was a chef at a steakhouse for six years and this is what their butchers used. Helping my friends butcher an elk years ago, finally my buddies dad put his stone sharpening system away after seeing how easy this was. I posted pictures because for some reason people always want to put the knife on top and it just doesn't work well that way. Three good swipes and you are ready to go. Maybe not the absolute best, but the easiest and most convenient IMO.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •