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Thread: Look at What Kookafornia Has Done!

  1. #1
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Smile Look at What Kookafornia Has Done!

    It coming to Alaska! You know how the smell tends to drift North! Funny thing is a Portland OR "Ecotrust" is involved.


    http://www.thelog.com/Newsletter/Art...rotected-Areas

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    We can only hope Kalifornia breaks off and sinks into the sea sooner than later.

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    Hmmmm, Iím not sure what your angle here is. Ecotrust, while being an Oregon based organization, facilitates projects up and down the West Coast. Furthermore, Ecotrust has merely partnered with other local researchers and science based groups such as the Ocean Protection Council in California to observe what effects a three year closure will have on a number of different variables including: socioeconomic factors, employment, perceived satisfaction etc.. In fact I would be very surprised if another group doesnít or hasnít already piggybacked with these groups to study marine rehabilitation in this area. While you may dismiss this article as an infringement on 15% of the Southern California Coastal waters, this is among things, a last gasp effort to study the effects of fishery closure on economic well being in an area that has been exposed to such over fishing that it is now devoid of once prosperous life. Ultimately, these groups are trying to fulfill the interests of countless individuals, oceanic protection groups and recreational enthusiasts alike, not simply economic profit from local fisheries.

    You were correct in your generalization that smell tends to drift north; unfortunately this is the smell of diminishing returns of wild stock, and marine ecological destruction. For example observe the effects that over fishing in Puget Sound waters off the coast of Washington have had on all kinds of oceanic life. Or for an example that spread from Kookifornia to Alaska Ė Please, if you can, recall the plight of the red abalone. I grew up in Southeast Alaska and remember seeing my last wild abalone in 1996.. How about you? Lastly, and most horrific of all, consider the fact that of all harvested seafood products by weight in Alaska, 30% were aquaculture/hatchery reared species this year. (FYI: For a state that refuses aquaculture, were getting closer and closer) Alaska, is currently committing the same mistakes that led Kookifornia to undergo the very research that they are now completing. They are doing as much as they can for to rectify a growing problem, letís hope they are not too late. One thing is certain, aquatic species in Alaskan waters are far from the same fate as those in Southern California; however, if changes in the approach to our Alaskan fisheries arenít made soon, serious repercussions may be observed.

    Ultimately, I want to be able to take my children fishing in the same legendary fisheries that my grandfather and father have taken me to, not merely tell them fish stories. As much as I despise saying it, Kookifornia has made a step in the right direction and it would behoove Alaska to consider changes of its own.

  4. #4
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellboy View Post
    Ultimately, I want to be able to take my children fishing in the same legendary fisheries that my grandfather and father have taken me to, not merely tell them fish stories. As much as I despise saying it, Kookifornia has made a step in the right direction and it would behoove Alaska to consider changes of its own.
    yep.
    politics is politics, science is different.
    it is important to learn to tell them apart.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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    Member SANDRAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    yep.
    politics is politics, science is different.
    it is important to learn to tell them apart.
    Objective Science is becoming as rare as honest politics these days,the two go hand in hand.Science driven by emotion and a quest for grant $$$$$ is the new norm,JMHO.

    On the other hand,I've seen what happens when numerous 1/2 day and day charters,plus private sport fishermen, target an area for all species 365 days a year for decades,there is literally nothing left to catch.The kelp beds off San Diego,and the Channel Islands are one example.The San Juan Isl off WA are another fishery that has dwindled in the past couple of decades.Just food for thought.

  6. #6

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    If you want to know the reason for the closures down there and up here (I.e. all of the king closures up here in recent years) look in the mirror. WE are the reason. As human populations grow we deplete resources. That's why we have bag limits, closed seasons and restricted/closed areas.

    Unfortunately, while most of us comprehend what's going on and recognized something needs to be done, there's a significant number of people up here who just don't care. They'll take as much as they can rules or no rules. You've seen this type of selfish, ignorant people probably as often as I do. I can't recall the last time I've been fishing and HAVEN'T seen people over harvesting. And when you mention it to them they don't stop and simply spout the usual "I'll do whatever I want" ignorance which is prevalent up here.

    So, yes, it's on it's way here as populations increase. It's inevitable and the fault lies in the person looking back at us in the mirror.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheeser View Post
    And when you mention it to them they don't stop and simply spout the usual "I'll do whatever I want" ignorance which is prevalent up here.
    That's when you call a trooper. I have NO problem doing this......

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    Member Brandon Emmett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    That's when you call a trooper. I have NO problem doing this......
    this dude is legit. dont be afraid to call the troopers. they are paid to put the "i do what i want" people in their place.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    It coming to Alaska! You know how the smell tends to drift North! Funny thing is a Portland OR "Ecotrust" is involved.


    http://www.thelog.com/Newsletter/Art...rotected-Areas
    Ecotrust is involved in implementing one of the requirements of the MLPA; the assesment of economic impact on coastal communities. That is a reasonable thing to do. The MLPAs on the other hand, are completely unreasonable and are being fought hard by the Partnership for Sustainable Oceans and other fishing/environmental groups. The science says that the MLPAs are too small and too spread out to be effective, that the primary causes of reduced fish populations are pollution and some types of commercial fishing, NOT recreational fishing, and that nearly all of the fish populations being tracked have been increasing for years. The reality is the state is broke, so there is no money for enforcement, making the Marine Protected Areas nothing more than Marine Poaching Areas.

    Bellboy, If anything like the California MLPAs get implemented in Alaska, you will still be allowed to visit the places you used to fish, but you sure as hell won't be allowed to fish there. Unlike the California MLPAs, many of the regulations now in place in Alaska make sense. I hope Alaska follows a different path than California and continues to do an equitable, sensible job of managing its marine resources.

    Big_E

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