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Thread: First Aid kits on your hunt.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Default First Aid kits on your hunt.

    I always carry a first aid kit with me when I hunt. Mine is pretty basic, bandages, gauze, tape to put pressure on a wound, some neosporin, painkillers, etc. I've thought about including an inflatable splint or some of that quick clot type stuff, but at some point you can't carry an EMT bag everywhere you go.

    What do you you carry with you when you're out hunting?

    The guy getting rolled by the grizzly in Eagle River got me thinking. While he may have not been "seriously injured" that doesn't mean an encounter like that couldn't be life threatening when you're out hunting instead of in your back yard.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    My first aid kit for back packing is very basic. Few band aids, tape, ace wrap, pain meds, anti diarrhea meds, antacid, material to make a tourniquet. Any serious injury will require professional care, so my SAT PHONE and personal locator are the 2 most important items in my kit, that and basic first aid knowledge of what to do in those first critical hours that follow a major accident or injury. Knowing who and when to call and having those numbers with you along with the ability to call help cannot be over stated.

    Restore breathing!!!

    Stop the bleeding!!!

    Treat for shock!!!

    Cause no farther injury!!

    Get help!!!!

    Steve
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  3. #3

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    GD Yankee,

    Good thread. I fly the EMS helicopter and you would NOT believe the totally unprepared people out and about! You are correct, you can not carry everything. However, you can carry some stuff in your pack and leave some stuff where you got dropped off, on your wheeler, in your plane, etc. I carry a SAT phone and a SPOT on my person, quickest way to get help fast. Next concern is bleeding to death. Would not take much to cut yourself cleaning an animal or even a fall that penetrates an artery. I carry Quick clot and an Army (heavy duty with ties attached) bandage on my person. I always have a belt on (if a tourniquet is needed) and clothes could also be used for bandages if need be. I carry a small mirror and tweezers to be able to get stuff out of an eye. Aspirin to thin blood, heart issues, stroke symptoms. If I am going above treeline (sheep hunting), you can use your poles for a splint. Below treeline of course you can use tree limbs, if you have your bone saw.


    Brett

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Funny you should say that about the Sat phone. I have thinking along those lines based on our experience in Iraq/Afghanistan. Remember a long time ago when tourniquets were considered "bad"? Stop/slow the bleeding and get on the horn for professional help.

    I get a kick out of the doomsday preppers/survivalists on TV teaching each other how to suture massive wounds. Everything I was taught was to clean the wound, put a clean bandage on it, and get to a real medical facility. Suturing by amateurs was more likely to seal in infection.

    I'm always impressed by the response time to Alaska's first responders when a major injury is called in from the bush. My take away from the bear attack or "I'm gonna die" books is that if you can stop the bleeding and get a call out, you'll likely make it to the hospital in time to survive.
    Last edited by GD Yankee; 05-15-2012 at 09:37. Reason: grammar

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    Member Ryan J's Avatar
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    +1 to what Stid said.
    The one I use out hunting I've added more trauma care type supplies. SAM splint and extra pressure dressings/cravats. I'm still on the fence if I want to add a suture kit or not. Right now the hunting trips I do have not taken me out of the 24 hour window to be able to get to a treatment facility. So, controlling bleeding so I/someone can be evacuated is my priority. Closing a dirty wound with sutures is a bad thing, but if I was to be further away from treatment it is something I may consider understanding it would have to be cut back open and cleaned/treated at a medical facility.

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    For my mountain hunts, my 1st aid kit is pretty skimpy. A couple bandaids, duct tape, chap stick, sunscreen, moleskin, neosporin, misc. pain pills. For float and drop camp hunts, my kit gets very extensive. I pretty much have everything to take care of just about anything short of major surgery. I also carry a sat phone on all hunts.

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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    My usual First Aid Kit is pretty basic also. I carry a larger one on canoe or car based trips, but for backpacking it's pretty small. I do have Wilderness First Aid training, which I think is as important as anything I carry.

    I don't carry a splint, but I do carry Quick Clot. It weighs next to nothing and I think it has the potential to really get a guy out of jam with a major bleeder. Considering how deadly shock can be when far from civilization, I think the ability to get bleeding stopped pronto is critical. Doubly true if I'm by myself, since it's really hard to apply direct pressure and get yourself rescued at the same time.

    Yk

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Yellowknife, where do you get quickclot? Online, or are there local places you can buy it?

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I have seen it at Sportsman's Warehouse.

    http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/s...2669/cat100919
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    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    We usually go for 10 or more days so we take a fairly complete first aid kit. I've only had to use it once when my hunting partner stabbed himself in the knee while carving up a caribou. I had to put in about 3 sutures. Yes I know how to do that, I was a corpsman in the Coast Guard for 8 years and flew medivacs in Alaska for 4. I've had a lot of practice.

    Most of the items are for large trauma, ABD's, wire splints, suture set etc. We also added a sat phone several years back. Use to carry my Forest Service radio with AST and Park Service frequencies added. Since I retired the sat phone works just fine. Jim

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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GD Yankee View Post
    Yellowknife, where do you get quickclot? Online, or are there local places you can buy it?
    Sportsmans Warehouse as Stid said, or I suspect Eagle Enterprise's in Anchorage would have it. They also have a "Trauma Pak" now that has some additional items in it for dealing with major cuts, bullet holes, bear bites etc. I will likely pick that up for field work this year.

    Yk

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    Member KelvinG's Avatar
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    I agree QuikClot is a must have in your first aid kit. Buy the QuikClot sponge.

    I donít know if they sell the granular QuikClot anymore, but there are issues with it. Iíve seen discussions, (on here I think) and have read Doctors studies where pouring the granular QuikClot in the wound allowed some of it to get into the arteries thereby causing blood clots where you didnít want blood clots.

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    The hardest thing to do is to keep your wits about you, which is much easier said than done. I will summarize the events that resulted in me having to call a Med Evac for a friend on a Kodiak hunt.

    We spotted a Billy on the ridge above camp and 3 of us decided to go after it. It was Oct 16th and was cold at night, freezing temps around 15 degrees or so. We had clear weather for the climb and all was well until we got the Billy dressed and packed up for the decent.

    The Billy had went about 300 yards down hill and this had us lower than we had been for the stalk. It started snowing and visibility was very poor, as we came out of the scree and started walking on the grass, it was slick from the snow and I and another hunter fell to our buts and started sliding downhill very quickly.

    We both tumbled, but she broke her leg, both bones above her boot. I had slid further down, but could hear her screaming and knew she was hurt bad.

    When I got to her she said she heard the bones break, I checked her leg and could feel the broken bones under the skin, but they had not come through.

    Okay, so we had a casualty down, above the tree line, in the fog, can not walk, about 2 hours of light left and temps going to be below freezing. She is not bleeding, but shock is a very real threat.

    I know we can not walk out with her or carry her to the sea. I use a ace bandage, a rain jacket, and some trekking poles to splint her leg together to prevent further injury. She was in extreme pain, so a also gave her some pain meds. We got her stable and covered and I start calling people, took several calls to both talk to the right people and to convince them that it was indeed a real emergency and that a Helicopter was needed.

    So we now have the Helo on the way, but we are up in the fog. So I decided to drag her down the hill to try to get below the ceiling so the helo could fly up from the sea under the clouds. We were going to drag her as low as we could and wait for the helo, if it could not make it we were going to siwash there and wait out the weather for an evac.

    As luck would have it, we got below the ceilings and right before the Helo arrived it cleared up, she was flown off just as it got dark.

    A few supplies, a Sat Phone, a little knowledge and most importantly the Coast Guard were the keys to keeping this accident from getting much worst than it was already.


    The accident site.



    Her getting off the Helo in town.

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    Sid. I would think that an ortho type injury would be one of the most devastating survivable injury in the out back. Splinting is key and thankfully simple. Stop movement and keep blood flow. I'm glad you got her out and she did well.

    I have been a MICP working in some bad locations with people that enjoy shooting each other. I have always felt trauma to be one the more simple things to treat in the field simplbecausese it is a surgicadiseasese. Meaning we can't do much but plug holes and stop bleeding. As for the QuicClotot the crap hardly works IMO not worth the weight in my pack. Best way to stop bleeding ( in a sever case ) is tourniquetut. Remember what you tie off you WILL lose. Yep I know sometimes they are able save budintnt count on it. This may be over kill but i have a gptransponderer on my wife my kids and I. I think the best chance osurvivalle in a sever situation is to get help. I don't have a sat phone but rent one wheI'mIm out.

    My first aid kit is rather simpTraumarama pads and aDuct tapetape is always in my bag and we should all have some sort of rope. I cant recall why but I will ocarrycary things that hat leasteasusessses. I guess some old guy told me that once and it just stuck. Thanks grandpa....

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Plan for the worst and hope for the best. Aside from packing for moderate bleeding and having basic splinting gear on hand there isn't much else to pack. I love super glue for cuts. Throw in some gauze pads, tape, heavy duty band aids and your set. many things can be supplemented with simple hunting gear.

    QuikKlot seems great, but keep in mind every bit of skin, muscle and tissue that it touches will have to be removed. That can mean a much larger surface area affected when it's all said and done.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    One thing to consider - Spot relies on the GlobalStar network, and is not ideal for many places in Alaska (it was designed for more temperate latitudes). The new DeLorme InReach works off of the Iridium system (same as most sat phones, so it works well in AK), and can be tied into your smart phone (or used by itself like a Spot). It also has two-way text, so it can be good for providing more information as needed and hearing back from EMS. The spot lets you send out messages, but you don't get message confirmation and are limited to pre-programmed messages. I have used both Spot and InReach, and they both have their limitations. The Spot has spotty reception, but is about 1/2 the size of the InReach unit.

    I'm not neccessarily advocating to get rid of your Spot, just know its limitations and make sure that if you get a satellite tracker, it will work everywhere you want to go and do what you need it to. It's really not worth finding out the hard way that some of your equipment isn't working. Just my thoughts...

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Stid,

    That Kodiak goat hunt that you wrote about is a classic survival story. Particularly since you all survived! It should be a "sticky" subject for hunting safety and wilderness survival in case of a traumatic event like you all experienced. It is one of the stories that keeps me asking "am I prepared?" if I or my buddies get hurt in the field.

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    I carry a small 'bleeding/burns kit' hunting, with bandages, anticeptics, kwikclot, tape, steristrips, super glue, salves and such while hunting.

    Here in the "village" Im a Chief in our VFD, as well as with our S@R and since accidents on snowmchines and boats are the rule, as a current ETT (lapsed EMT awaiting a recertifycation class) I go out several times a year and bring in my friends and aquaintences where no health aides tread and the Troopers cant land...... I do have an extensive pack as well as the special extras the Arctic demands, as well that accidents often have 2 or more injured. This cold winter was a real pain on the brain for these happenings, seems the colder it is, the more folks get tripped up and dead.

    Without a helocopter (what frikkin' joke! No helocopter is comming for anyone here, SPOT or not), I bring 'Transport' things, like Heat pads and a down sleeping bag, several layers of cusion, a basket type sled, as slow and comfortable as possible is the best way to bring in the Dead, Broken and Bloodied.

    Knowlage is as important, if not more important, as equipment, and "make due" is the rule, not the exception in the field.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by GD Yankee View Post
    Stid,

    That Kodiak goat hunt that you wrote about is a classic survival story. Particularly since you all survived! It should be a "sticky" subject for hunting safety and wilderness survival in case of a traumatic event like you all experienced. It is one of the stories that keeps me asking "am I prepared?" if I or my buddies get hurt in the field.
    One thing I learned, was that a couple hundred dollars in gear can save thousands in medical bills and recovery time.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member jojomoose's Avatar
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    I have been searching for the little packable kit we got issued in Iraq, and now i am starting to see them. If you enter Tactical medical kits in a search engine you get some very good and lightweight kits. It has quickclot, really nice easy to use tunikits, molding splints and much much more. you should check them out, about 100 bucks but it is very much worth it if you have to stich something, or even more severe. just my in put.....

    Joe.

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