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Thread: Pot Etiquette......

  1. #1

    Default Pot Etiquette......

    i've been reading some posts trying to get up to speed on shrimping and i had a question... What is the proper etiquette for setting pots next to other pots that are (or seem to be) in a good location?

    Is that a breach of etiquette (seems like not from the posts)
    What is reasonable separation for instance?

    Any other things that are generally courteous between shrimpers would be helpful also.

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I haven't gotten any shrimping in yet but here is what I do for my crab pots in Homer.
    When I set pots I like to space them a minimum of 1/10 of a mile apart or further. That is if I am setting my own or setting near someone else.
    I don't have a problem setting near others pots but often times I will just mark the location on my plotter to try at a latter date.
    If I get to an area I wan't to set on and find pots already there I will give them at least 1/10 of a mile and usually more if I can.
    be aware of the tides also and which way they are running to keep your buoy's away from theirs. for instance if it is slack tide be aware their buoy could be anywhere around the pots and will move when the tide change so give them a little more room during those times.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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  3. #3

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    As Kasilofchrisn mentioned, the big thing is to make sure you give plenty of room....then give a bit more. Where the pots are compared to the buoy location can be impacted by a number of things. How much weight they have, the type of line they are using, the length of line they are using, the tide, the depth, the winds, etc...

  4. #4

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    General pot etiquette regardless of species and location:

    Don't use @#$%@$#%$ floating line to your buoys. Using it down below is good, but use sinking line for the top 50' or so. The prop you save might be your own.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    SInce I run 900 foot of line and one bouy, at least 1,000 feet in any direction as you don't know where my string is. If I have to pull up ten pots, the five I have to throw back are going to be just that, "thrown back". I am not untangling your mess.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Don't set your pots right on top of somebody elses, I'd say 1/4 mile is a safe distance. You have to account for the fact that where there buoy is located and where their pots are located can easily be several hundred feet apart. Then factor in your pots are going to drift on their way to the bottom.

    Also be cognisant of the commonly traveled boating/shipping lanes. Dropping them smack dab in the middle of where most boats are running is just begging to have somebody run over your buoy and cut your line.

    Just because somebody else has dropped pots in a location, doesn't mean it's a great spot. I've generally done my best when I follow advice concering what type of location to look for vs. monkey see, monkey do.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    vs. monkey see, monkey do.
    Funny one Paul!!!

    Happens to me all the time when I'm out there fishing by myself. Some joker makes a bee line straight for me, and then takes his boat off step about 50 yds from me and starts fishing. Like I'm the world's greatest fisherman (and I do have delusions of grandeur!)

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Happened to me last year when dropping some pots in Passage Canal on the way out to go fishing. I get off step and am getting the pots ready when two boats appear out of nowhere and each is within 100 yds of me dropping their pots, ***? On the up side the other spot I dropped at yielded better numbers of shrimp than that spot
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    It's also worth noting that you should look at the buoy for commercial #s. If it's a commercial set, there could be well over five pots on that line. That being said, if there are five or more the commercial fishermen are required to have a buoy at each end of the set, so you could look around for another bouy with the same ADF&G # and avoid the line between them.

  10. #10
    Member SkinnyD's Avatar
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    Q: Why did the shrimp cross 800 yards of uneven ocean floor?

    A: To get in the shrimp pot of the person who set up half a mile away.
    Passing up shots on mergansers since 1992.


  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    General pot etiquette regardless of species and location:

    Don't use @#$%@$#%$ floating line to your buoys. Using it down below is good, but use sinking line for the top 50' or so. The prop you save might be your own.
    You can have lots of leaded line on top and still have line from below float up. If you have floating line just clip on weights.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    You can have lots of leaded line on top and still have line from below float up. If you have floating line just clip on weights.
    That'll do. Just don't leave it floating all over the surface.

    Around here if a guy leaves a bunch of loose line floating on the surface, someone will come along at low tide and coil and tie the excess. Second time the knot is not likely to be very "polite." Worst case excess line has been known to get cut off. Could have been a prop. Could have been a knife.

  13. #13

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    Thanks for the input.

    (guess I better find the receipt for 1500 ft of floating line eh?)

  14. #14
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    One more thing in addition to what everybody has already said. Keep in mind that when you're pulling your pots on a windy day you will move a lot. Weekend before last, I was blown several hundred yards as I pulled each pot. If you're anyway near somebody else's set, you will get tangled as your pot and line get dragged across that other string.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjjeeper View Post
    Thanks for the input.

    (guess I better find the receipt for 1500 ft of floating line eh?)
    You can weight it like Skydiver suggests. Just use a few halibut clips and weights. You'll be happier yourself if it's rough when you're motoring up to your buoys.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boater View Post
    One more thing in addition to what everybody has already said. Keep in mind that when you're pulling your pots on a windy day you will move a lot. Weekend before last, I was blown several hundred yards as I pulled each pot. If you're anyway near somebody else's set, you will get tangled as your pot and line get dragged across that other string.
    Yup. Pull your downwind pots first.

  17. #17
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjjeeper View Post
    Thanks for the input.

    (guess I better find the receipt for 1500 ft of floating line eh?)
    My parents used to commercially shrimp the Sound from the late 60's through the late 90's. They always used floating line, and we still do to this day. As others have said, two or three 16oz sinkers will do the trick. We never have any line floating on the surface - never. Just don't set your gear if you have anyone that might run behind your stern while doing so.

  18. #18

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    I'll hold back from posting the name of the boat that put their string of pots about ~150' from my buoy this past Saturday. They also had over 25' of floating line on the surface around their buoy. As I idled while retrieving my gear I drifted over their floating line and had to wait until clear before putting it back in gear.

  19. #19
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Why hold off? Post em up.............

  20. #20

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    Nah, I don't want to steer this thread into the gutter. Just wanted to share my recent observation of a 'breach of etiquette'. I'm fine with people setting nearby but this was ridiculous.

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