Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Article on making good decisions while hunting

  1. #1
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default Article on making good decisions while hunting

    Folks, I offer this article that's just been published in the May Precision Shooting magazine. It highlights the importance of making good decisions when hunting in Alaska. The author is my Dad, and this article is a merger of two hunts that have a strong lesson and tragic outcome. The hunts took place 48 years ago on Afognak and Kodiak, and he explains in the article why he waited so long to have these published.

    This link takes you to the article on the magazine's web site. No membership is required to view the article since they've put it up as their feature article in their May magazine. If you prefer reading hard copy, you can also print this pdf document.

    http://www.precisionshooting.com/psm_2012_05_frame.html

    My Dad told me about these events many years ago (I was only 1 yr old when these happened), and I have used these stories and their lessons many times to indoctrinate new outdoorsman to Kodiak. Suffice it to say that I have personally benefitted from these same lessons as they have often flashed up in my brain at opportune times.

    I hope you too can benefit from hearing these stories.

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Thanks for sharing, eye opening to say the least.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  3. #3
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Very good read. Tell your Dad "Thanks for sharing".
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  4. #4
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,600

    Default

    Outstanding write up and needed info for young hard chargers.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks for sharing the article.

    It's amazing how easily something can go from pursing the hunt of a lifetime, to the end of a life. It just takes one bad decision. And, it seems that every year at least one Alaskan hunter makes that decision.

  6. #6
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    That is a very tragic story of what can and will happen in the outdoors when you fail to take proper precautions.

  7. #7
    Member highestview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Haines
    Posts
    1,308

    Default

    Shiite, that was chilling. Thank you for sharing. It's good that that story is told. I listened to a story from my hunting partner's great uncle about a man who got his snowmachine soaked in overflow and iced up the belt. He got soaked trying to get the thing out and only by the grace of God, found their cabin before laying down in the snow. They were asleep, miles away from anything resembling civilization when somebody started pounding on the door. His life was saved by them.

    Tis the season...to be prepared and be careful.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Why must this chilling experience be enacted over and over again? It reminds my of my good friend, Andrew "Bear" Piekarski, who was mowing the lawn at his King Bear Lodge along the Yentna River just above Lake Creek. The mower slipped over the bank, pinning its operator beneath its heavy weight, and on a cold and wet gravel bar. Though one of the strongest and toughest men in Alaska, he was unable to lift the mower's heavy weight. He apparently thought to disassemble the blade housing using his Leatherman tool, always at hand on his belt. He was unable to free the small but useful tool and he died as the ignominious result of hypothermia before morning could bring a little heat to the disturbing and most tragic scene.

    As we all should know, Alaska can be terribly unforgiving . . . . .

  9. #9
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Sad as it may be, the first thing that came to my mind was....Well....at least a da*n bear didn't get em'......

  10. #10
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    You know...it dawns on me if we had threads on here proportional to the actual danger involved we'd have 100 hypothermia and falling threads for every bear thread.

    Food for thought.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  11. #11
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default

    Wow, this is a troubling story to say the least. It does serve as a good reminder of the the dangers we face and accept when we venture out in the beautiful vastness of alaska. We all have made mistakes in the field and hopefully learn from them. It's also the sharing of stories like this that we may in someway save the life of a fellow sportsmen.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •