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Thread: Boat Selection

  1. #1
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    Default Boat Selection

    Wife gave me the green light to spend $20,000 on an ocean boat. Not as much as I would like but I'll take what I can get. Now, what is the best fit for me. The majority of the use would be to do some fishing, shrimping, and hunting in PWS. Mixed in with a few day trips out of Seward or Homer. I have looked at a few boats currently on craigslist but can't decide what type of boat I want exactly. First option I have been looking at are Hewescraft, 18-21 ft sportsman or Searunner. Like the options with this type of boat and the seating for trips in and out. Would like a hard top for a zodiac, but that is out of my range.
    Then I saw an Arima and a Cdory and thought that might be an option. A berth would be nice. Especially with a kid for naps. But they move a little slower and you give up seating. Fiberglass vs. aluminum? I think I might need some guidance.

    Any help or suggestions would be great.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Bayliner Trophy all the boat you want at a price you can afford. Hardtop, I/O, fiberglass, v-berth. I have seen nice ones on trailers from $7,500 to your $20k limit. On the lower end you could be looking at a few years worth of fuel.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    As far as ocean boats, generally you will find more fiberglass boats, such as bayliners,olympics,and glasplys, in your price range than you will aluminum boats. Like Sobie mentioned, Bayliner Trophy is a popular boat up here, you can do a lot with one, and you can find them in your price range. Inboards are a little harder to work on than outboards, but IMO they are just as reliable as an outboard. If you get a boat with an I/O setup, and the outdrive is older, keep a close eye on the gear oil, if it is getting water in it, get it rebuilt before it leaves you stranded. I had an old outdrive that I ran for several years with no problems other than a prop spinning a hub.
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    Hoose and Sobie suggested exactly what came to my mind. You can get a pretty nice older trophy for right around. It's a decent a safe ocean boat with all the features you'll need for doing what you suggested. I'd look there first. A few years ago when I was looking I came across 2 or 3 that had relatively new engines and outdrives and were in really good shape for the low to mid $20Ks. The I/O setup requires a little more maintenance than an 4 stroke outboard but to get an ocean boat in your price range with a 4 stroke outboard is going to be tough.

    A Hewes Searunner softtop would be a good boat as well but they would be tight for multiday trips unless it was just you and your wife. My wife and I had a 22ft with a hardtop and were able to do multiday trips in the sound but we quickly realized with our dogs and kids on the way we were going to need to upgrade to something bigger. Good luck in your search.

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    I would say take your wife with you to look at boats. Start out within her budget, and then look at some a bit higher. She may get the urge to spend a bit more than what she thought to start with.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    I would say take your wife with you to look at boats. Start out within her budget, and then look at some a bit higher. She may get the urge to spend a bit more than what she thought to start with.
    I like the way you think!

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    Keep in mind that $20K is just the start. Especially with an older boat. Gas, maintenance, launch fees, new fishing gear, a new tow vehicle - it really adds up.

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    I would say take your wife with you to look at boats. Start out within her budget, and then look at some a bit higher. She may get the urge to spend a bit more than what she thought to start with.
    Great advice! That's what I did and it worked out for the better in the end.

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    Even though itíll probably be stretching your budget and might bust it a bit, youíll find a 22í cabin cruiser is easily double the boat an 18í skiff is. The cabin isnít just nice for the kids, it makes all the difference getting out of the weather when motoring between fishing spots and effectively doubles your fishing season based on the number of days you can comfortably go out and fish. Simply put youíre not likely to find an aluminum boat in that configuration in your price range, so youíll have to go with glass. Not a big deal, there are ways to anchor to shore w/o a dinghy and even with an aluminum boat there are a lot of places where you arenít going to beach it. Aluminum is great for tough and little maintenance, but they conduct heat right out of the boat and are loud, so glass has itís advantages. Also donít get too hung up on trying to get monster fishing deck, itís not like youíre going to be fishing six people on boats this size.

    I wouldnít get hung up on a particular brand, Iíd be more concerned what condition the boat and especially engine/drive are in than who made the boat. Also give strong consideration for the accessories included with a used boat. Break Out Another Thousand is something youíll be repeating multiple times if you just get a boat, motor and trailer. Iíd also steer clear of the good deal fixer uppers. Youíll spend your summer and money fixing it up rather than using it. Finding the meticulous seller that kept everything in top shape is always the better bet, the couple thousand extra you spend up front will save you much more down the road.

    If you can find a boat with an outboard Iíd go that route. When you put an inboard in a 22í boat, there isnít much deck space left to fish. Also factor in operating costs. Spending a little more up front to get a more fuel efficient boat will quickly pay for itself. If you could find an older C-dory 22 with say a 90 horse outboard itíll be fairly fuel efficient.

    A little on the small side, but looks like a nice boat

    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2959986097.html

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  10. #10

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    Step one: Without having your wife along, find the boat that you like/want, regardless of price (within reason). Make sure it has a head.
    Step two: Without having your wife along, find other boats that you don't want. Make sure they don't have a head.
    Step three: Show your wife all of the boats. She will pick the one with the head.

  11. #11
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    22' to 26' Olympic with newer four stroke outboard power.

    Look down in SE AK for starters. Ferry it to haines and tow it home. Preparation is key, since the road is a long one and you won't be certain of the boat's condition. This means a number of things and possibilities: mechanical checkout by local mechanic ($$), survey by yourself prior to purchase ($$), planning for trailer issues (namely bearings and brakes), and the like. You can get a lot of boat for the money that way, as the logistics are difficult.

    A 26' Olympic with a 225 Honda would have you doing 95% of what can be done in saltwater with a trailerable boat, and there have been several for sale off and on in the few years I've been casually looking down that way.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MNAK08 View Post
    Wife gave me the green light to spend $20,000 on an ocean boat. Not as much as I would like but I'll take what I can get. Now, what is the best fit for me. The majority of the use would be to do some fishing, shrimping, and hunting in PWS. Mixed in with a few day trips out of Seward or Homer. I have looked at a few boats currently on craigslist but can't decide what type of boat I want exactly. First option I have been looking at are Hewescraft, 18-21 ft sportsman or Searunner. Like the options with this type of boat and the seating for trips in and out. Would like a hard top for a zodiac, but that is out of my range.
    Then I saw an Arima and a Cdory and thought that might be an option. A berth would be nice. Especially with a kid for naps. But they move a little slower and you give up seating. Fiberglass vs. aluminum? I think I might need some guidance.

    Any help or suggestions would be great.
    If your a do-it-yourself kind of guy, I know where there's a 27' Alamar Aluminum Jet Line, with a 6' forward leaning Cuddy, v-berth, Inboard 454 with a Hamilton 1031 in running conditions that can be had for under $20K. The interior is currently gutted and she's ruff but for under $10K I'm sure she could look nearly new again. Shoot me a PM if interested.

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    Thanks everyone for your help. It is really helping me think, and getting me excited. I did look at this boat and the guy seemed like a pretty straight shooter. It needed a new top and new depth/fish finder but otherwise it checked out. Then I saw this one on craigslist and didn't know which one was the better riding, fishing, etc.
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2986234795.html
    Wife likes the options on the arima, but I would really like a dingy to run in and out on and couldn't figure out a way on that. THis one I could put it on top and look at replacing for a better motor in a year or two.
    Any more suggestions on type would help. In a dream world I would love to do a 22' hewes with a hard top, but would need about 10-15,000 more allowance.
    Thanks again all. I'll keep looking and asking.

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Even though itíll probably be stretching your budget and might bust it a bit, youíll find a 22í cabin cruiser is easily double the boat an 18í skiff is. The cabin isnít just nice for the kids, it makes all the difference getting out of the weather when motoring between fishing spots and effectively doubles your fishing season based on the number of days you can comfortably go out and fish. Simply put youíre not likely to find an aluminum boat in that configuration in your price range, so youíll have to go with glass. Not a big deal, there are ways to anchor to shore w/o a dinghy and even with an aluminum boat there are a lot of places where you arenít going to beach it. Aluminum is great for tough and little maintenance, but they conduct heat right out of the boat and are loud, so glass has itís advantages. Also donít get too hung up on trying to get monster fishing deck, itís not like youíre going to be fishing six people on boats this size.

    I wouldnít get hung up on a particular brand, Iíd be more concerned what condition the boat and especially engine/drive are in than who made the boat. Also give strong consideration for the accessories included with a used boat. Break Out Another Thousand is something youíll be repeating multiple times if you just get a boat, motor and trailer. Iíd also steer clear of the good deal fixer uppers. Youíll spend your summer and money fixing it up rather than using it. Finding the meticulous seller that kept everything in top shape is always the better bet, the couple thousand extra you spend up front will save you much more down the road.

    If you can find a boat with an outboard Iíd go that route. When you put an inboard in a 22í boat, there isnít much deck space left to fish. Also factor in operating costs. Spending a little more up front to get a more fuel efficient boat will quickly pay for itself. If you could find an older C-dory 22 with say a 90 horse outboard itíll be fairly fuel efficient.

    A little on the small side, but looks like a nice boat

    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2959986097.html


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    Take your 20 grand and go put the money down on new boat. Anything that runs in the ocean for 20 grand will come with 20 grand in fixing her up.
    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Something to consider is do you really just want to get a boat to get you out on the water, or do you want a boat that is suitable for your use? It sounds like you are looking more for a cruising boat (some fising, shrimping and hunting) rather than a hard core fishing boat. Hence it sounds like what you want is a boat for multi day trips. In a 20' and under boat you are not going to be sleeping on it, it just isn't big enough. You might think, no problem, we'll just camp on shore.

    What I've found in PWS is there are few anchorages that offer a flat dry place to set up a tent without making a significant hike from shore. Setting up and tearing down a campsite takes a fair bit of time, and you simply have to factor your camping stuff getting wet. Once you've made the decision to camp, you've tied yourself to a given anchorage for the weekend or however long your trip vs. hitting a different bay each night. Having a boat that you can reasonably comfortably sleep on is a huge time saver, and opens up alot more of the sound to you.

    I guess that's a long way of saying that you should think long and hard about getting a boat to get you out on the water, which really isn't suited to what you want to do, and which you'll be replacing sooner than later, or spending some more time and money to get what you want. I'd highly recomend renting a hewescraft from the guys in Whiitier for a 2 to 3 day trip to see how you like it. While it's not cheap to rent a boat from them, finding out what you consider a suitable boat before plunking down an on unsuitable one is money well spent.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    You might consider this Boston Whaler: http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2992503115.html

    This is a great value. Run the old 2-strokes like you stole them for a couple of seasons and upgrade to a big four stroke and a kicker.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Paul: Thanks for the tidbit on renting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    You might consider this Boston Whaler: http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2992503115.html

    This is a great value. Run the old 2-strokes like you stole them for a couple of seasons and upgrade to a big four stroke and a kicker.
    Agreed, I wouldn't hesitate to take a serious look at this if I was in the market for a used boat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNAK08 View Post
    Wife gave me the green light to spend $20,000 on an ocean boat. Not as much as I would like but I'll take what I can get. Now, what is the best fit for me. The majority of the use would be to do some fishing, shrimping, and hunting in PWS. Mixed in with a few day trips out of Seward or Homer. I have looked at a few boats currently on craigslist but can't decide what type of boat I want exactly. First option I have been looking at are Hewescraft, 18-21 ft sportsman or Searunner. Like the options with this type of boat and the seating for trips in and out. Would like a hard top for a zodiac, but that is out of my range.
    Then I saw an Arima and a Cdory and thought that might be an option. A berth would be nice. Especially with a kid for naps. But they move a little slower and you give up seating. Fiberglass vs. aluminum? I think I might need some guidance.

    Any help or suggestions would be great.
    I'd recommend this boat!
    Of course if you could come up with another $10K I know of a nicer boat even yet. Well, thats the story of them all though. If $20K is your safety limit this is a great boat for the $$$$.
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/2989053454.html

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