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Thread: Chest Freezer in toy hauler

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    Default Chest Freezer in toy hauler

    While out hunting for 10 days, how would you keep power to your freezer in your RV? I'm thinking of solar panel/batteries/converter. Don't wish to spend thousands on propane freezer. Any suggestions are welcome...

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I know a lot of folks that travel here during fishing and hunting season that use small freezers either on trailers or in the back of trucks. They use small Honda generators and run them during the heat of the day then just keep the freezer in the shade and cover them with blankets to hold in the cold.

    Alaskan temps are moderate to cool even in the summer.

    Many use this method to hard freeze fish to reset their fish possession limit.

    Steve
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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    While out hunting for 10 days, how would you keep power to your freezer in your RV? I'm thinking of solar panel/batteries/converter. Don't wish to spend thousands on propane freezer. Any suggestions are welcome...
    I have a 5 Cu freezer in my rv with a 2000 watt power inverter running off my two golf cart auxillary batteries. I start my RV once a day and let the Generator run for 1 hour and it charges the system which also runs everthing else in my motor home, furnace, lights, etc,, except the microwave and AC if it gets too hot which happens just a few days a year. The freezer takes up very little power. I think is all you were running was your freezer for 10 days, and it was cold to start with and full, you should be fine. Any empty space in the freezer should be filled with either ice bottles (milk jugs or 2 liter bottles frozen with ice, or even crunched up news papers as insulation to fill the void. Its the airspace that will warm up causing your freezer to start up frequently.

  4. #4

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    so if I understand you right, a ten day drain on the truck's batteries (freezer only) would be enough for the freezer, just crank up the generator and recharge everything prior to moving on??

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuskovich View Post
    so if I understand you right, a ten day drain on the truck's batteries (freezer only) would be enough for the freezer, just crank up the generator and recharge everything prior to moving on??
    There is a big difference between a 12 volt battery and 2 deep cycle golf cart batteries wired in series. I would think that if you had 2 6 volt wired in series at full charge and a cold freezer with everything frozen hard inside and you filled all empty space with ice bottles or insulation like news paper you should be fine for 10 days. Keep it out of the sun and ventilate the area if possible. You could also add a solar trickle charger to your batteries to help. They are pretty cheap. Make sure you don't have something else running to drain your batteries. I think if you do a regular car 12 volt battery, you might run out of battery.

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    One issue with adding a solar option is counting on the weather. What might work for mostly sunny days will likely not for cloudy days. Depending on where and when you're going that might not be advisable. I would prefer the all battery option for reliability.

    But I think I would test the all battery option before leaving it for 10 days. The amount of power drain would depend on the particular freezer; it's size and efficiency rating mostly. Should be an easy thing to test though. Just fill it with water jugs, freeze it hard while under external power and then check your battery's voltage every day. (Or just check to see if everything remains frozen at the end.) You could also add foam insulation panels to the sides and top of the freezer to increase efficiency.

    Might there be a way to turn on a generator depending on the battery level, or even set on a timer to run for an hour every day? Truck refrigerator/freezer containers have a way to do this, as they sometimes get left for several days at a time.

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    Member Derby06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    One issue with adding a solar option is counting on the weather. What might work for mostly sunny days will likely not for cloudy days. Depending on where and when you're going that might not be advisable. I would prefer the all battery option for reliability.
    Most RV solar panels charge the batteries; so adding the solar power to charge the batteries can only help. Even on cloudy days, they will give a small charge to the batteries. On sunny days they really rock.

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    Yeah, but... If it's cloudy the whole 10 days (a high odds possibility in many times & places within AK) the amount of power a solar panel would add would be minimal. For what the good ones cost, I certainly would not want to have to count on them. An additional battery would be a cheaper and more reliable solution if it must work in all weather conditions.

    Solar makes for a good choice if counting on it isn't an absolute necessity.

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    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    I've got 2 solar panels on my toy hauler. They do a great job at keeping the batteries charged most of the time. If it was me, I'd test to see how much running the freezer is going to run your batteries down. If it isn't too bad, I'd go with it and just use the generator as a backup.
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    I do not understand why you would want to keep it running for the 10 days when you are out hunting are you going to have fish in the freezer? If that the reason why don't you put it in a local freezer for the time your out hunting.

    What is the weather condition where you are hunting? If it hot... the inside of the tow hauler could get so hot (>100*) the freezer will be running all the time. When you do your test put a remote thermometer inside the freezer so you will not need to open it up to see what the temperature is.

    Do you all ready have the freezer or know the one you want, if so what is wattage it needs?

    There is another option remove the electric motor and replace it with a small gas engine to turn the compressor and add a large gas tank to run for 10 days.

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