Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Anchoring out from shore

  1. #1
    Member Arcticmayhem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    154

    Question Anchoring out from shore

    Does anybody have a method for anchoring a boat out past the low tide line, but still retrievable from shore without a dingy? As an example of what I mean, let's say you want to spend some time on shore or even camp out overnight, but the tide is going out. What do you do? If you leave the boat tied up on shore, when you come back, it will be high and dry, or at least beat up on the rocks. There has got to be a good way to do this, but I was hoping that someone else had done it so I don't have to re-invent the wheel.

    With small rafts and skiffs in light weather, I have used a weight tied about 20 feet down the bow line. Then I push the boat out and when it drifts far enough out, I yank the weight off the bow and tie the line to a tree. When I come back, I can drag the weight back to shore with the line. This works, but it doesn't hold well, and I end up dragging 100 pounds of seaweed up with it.

    I have also seen an elastic anchor line that you could anchor out, then stretch it to shore, and then with another line tied to shore, let the boat rebound. When you are ready to go, just stretch the boat back in to shore. I really didn't like that method, since if you can pull the boat to shore, a good breeze could do the same. Also if the anchor got stuck, getting it out with an elastic anchor line could be problematic.

    A pulley system might be an option. Use something like a clothes line double pulley system to reel the boat out and back. I'm sure something like this has been done before. I am interested to hear what other people have been doing to solve this problem.

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I have tried several ways. But, a small raft or dingy is by far the best and most reliable.

    I use 2 anchor buddys tied together as one is not long enough.

    I now mostly bring an extra anchor and set it and attach a bouy and snap and use a small raft to go to shore. I leave it set at camp so coming back is quick and easy.

    I also keep at least one survival suit on shore just in case,, one cold swim was enough.

    Waiting out a tide cycle sucks.. don't ask me how I know.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  3. #3
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,080

    Default

    Here is what I have done when staying at the state cabin in Tutka with my riverboat, it sounds complicated, but its simple to do, however it requires a lot of line.
    I use my anchor with some chain, I disconnect the anchor from my anchor line and attach a fairly large SS clevis. I then take the loose end of the anchor line and run it through the clevis.

    I also attach another line to a stern cleat.
    I then go out far enough to get past low tide and drop the anchor, I then reverse towards shore while paying out the line, this is awkward to do solo, but I have done it. And can be a real pain if its very rough, I would probably let the boat "go dry" if that was the case.

    So you reverse towards shore until you get close enough to step off the back with both lines in hand, then tie off the stern line leaving plenty of slack line. Now use the bow to pull the boat back out into deep water. The bow line will be attached to a bow cleat and run through the anchor clevis and back to shore, the chain and angle the line goes to shore will keep the anchor on the bottom.
    (my boat has a step on the back and I have a lift on the motor so I can get the prop up quite high, otherwise you might have to nose in, I am sure I could nose in, but I havent had too. If you had to nose in you might have to have both lines to the bow.)

    Usally if there is wind, it is blowing towards shore and then the boat is pulling back on the anchor, I am sure it is lifting the end of the anchor chain off the bottom some, but it is pulling equally as hard against the end on shore I dont think the angle of the anchor chain is a issue.

    I have done this in several overnight anchorages in K-bay and have never had the boat come loose, its a 20 riverboat so its not very big. The key is having sufficent rope.

    It is much easier to do if you have another person on shore that can help with the lines, usally they would have the stern line and can pull you back in after you drop the anchor, you can step off the boat with the bow line in hand and use that to pull the boat back out.
    Essentially this could be called a temporary running line.

    The anchorage in Tutka gets steep enough fairly quickly, if you are anchoring where is shallow for a long way it would be possible but could require an excessive amount of rope.

    I have about 300 feet of anchor rope, which is not always enough and I have had to tie on another 100 feet or so, and you need the same amount for the stern line. It works...!

    The only drag for me is if I am spending a week at one place I end up pulling the anchor and resetting every night, a bouy and another anchor would solve this problem, but I always seem like I have to much gear, and I use the bouy as seat if Im fishing in the bow of my boat and sometimes for pulling the anchor.

    What size craft are you dealing with?
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  4. #4
    Member Arcticmayhem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    What size craft are you dealing with?
    It is an 18' SeaRunner.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southwest Alaska
    Posts
    2,146

    Default

    This has been discussed before I believe.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

  6. #6

    Default

    I`m with Stid on this one...simplest way.

    http://www.tuggyproducts.com/anchorbuddy.html



    What I do different is place a heavy anchor with buoy and tie the system to the buoy...this helps other boaters know there is a line there and to avoid the boat area. I can leave the anchor/buoy there to fish and just clip back in and nothing has changed.


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Kodiak Alaska
    Posts
    27

    Default

    simone H at anchor in Long Island Lagoon (3).jpgbringing the boat in to leave (2).jpg
    I use a shore anchor when I need to leave the boat anchored from the beach. I carry a 120' line just for this reason.
    step 1) tie one end of the line around the shaft and flukes of my bruce anchor.
    step2) feed out enough chain and line from my anchor locker and secure it around a cleat and anchor roller.
    step3) retrieve my shore bag, with handheld vhf and secure the other end of the line securely to another anchor or tree on shore.
    step4) set the anchor and extra chain and line on the bow of the boat and push the boat away from the shore.
    step five) when the boat has drifted far enough from shore pull on the line and the anchor, chain, and line fall into the water securely anchoring the boat in water deep enough to stay afloat.
    To retrieve the boat simply pull the shore line in and the boat will follow, so easy two kids can do it unassisted.
    I hope this helps.

  8. #8
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    I have a second anchor that I attach to a bouy. The anchor is dropped say 60' ish foor from shore and line tied to the bouy with a little extra rope to allow for tide change. I typically anchor in about 20' of water so at about 10' from the anchor I have attached a pulley. Through the pulley a seperate line (could be 300'-400' or as required) is strung to and from shore. About mid way on this line is a carabiner in which I clip to the bow of the boat. If you are at shore and attach the clip you can then pull the other end of the rope to pull the boat out to the bouy and then tie off the line on shore to hold it there. When it is time to leave, untie the same line and pull the other rope to retrieve your boat to shore. This rope simply pulls the boat to and from the bouy from shore via the pulley. I'd like to say it has worked flawless because it does work but apparently last spring there were some odd winds I assume that spun up both of our boats and prevented retrieval. Needless to say my son volunteered to board an air mattress and paddle out to retrieve our boat.

    Here is a picture showing an anchor buddy settup. http://www.wholesalemarine.com/blog/...nchorbuddy.jpg The primary difference between this and the method I use is that I am not limited to the length of the anchor buddy and there is one line that goes to and from the bouy via the pulley so that I am only limited in distance from shore by the amount of rope I have and there is no line attached to the transom (as its not necessary) and the boat comes to shore bow first. Hope that makes sense.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Hi Meyhem. I have a smaller 17' Sea Runner and it seems like i have tried nearly everything. Now I just carry a small inflatable kayak and use it for a dingy.

  10. #10
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    You guys have fun with all those contraptions I will stick with a raft and paddling back to shore. Another nice thing about aluminum boats is just parking them on shore whenever you feel like it and waiting on the tide to come back in. Like Steve I have done this a time or two, sometimes on purpose and other times due to me not paying attention or falling asleep.

  11. #11
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    I use bungie cord. 1/4 inch size. I am only anchoring a 15' zodiac.

    Drop wife on shore.

    Tie 100' 1/2 inch rope to back of boat.

    Drive boat out about 100 yards from shore - maybe a little more to give room to "set" the anchor.

    clip 100 foot of 1/4 inch bungie cord to last link of anchor chain. clip other end of bungie to front of boat.

    Drop anchor (with 300 foot of rode). I pay the line out so as not to get tangled up - the bungie likes to tangle into a mess.

    Back into shore.

    Throw wife tag end of 100' of rope tied to back.

    She finishes pulling the boat to shore after I lift up the motor.


    I jump out and tie the rope to a tree.


    Works awesome.

    two clips for 3 bucks each.

    100 foot of 1/4 in bungie was about 50 bucks at B&J's.


    I also clip a bouy to the line when I leave - so I don't have to pay it all out again. BUT this leaves me with no anchor on the boat.........a bad thing I know.

  12. #12
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    In this pic you can see the Anchor buddy snapped to the stern tight and also see that it was about 15 feet too short. I bought another after this beaching and now use 2 hooked together for 80ft of stretch and even with this I still get burnt. Every anchorage is different and you need to watch a few tides cycles to figure it out. With a 20ft tide I want to be in at least 40ft of water.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  13. #13
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default

    I've tried most of the setups suggested here for "clotheslining" the boat to and from shore to an anchor out past the low tide line. Almost every time, as we have a tide current along our shore, even in the calm water most of you show in your pictures, the rope/line or whatever fills with sea weeds which creates huge drag....a few times enough to un-set the anchor (yep, it should have been bigger anchor), and all the time making pulling the boat in a big hassle because you have to get all the weeds off, and often they clog the pulley on the anchor end and I would end up having to pull the anchor loose, if I could. The only way I can see to avoid this is a HUGE anchor strong enough that the line can be mounted high enough on shore that it is entirely out of the water. Bottom line, I gave that up and just use a shore dingy, a sea kayak works if you have a boat you can beach, otherwise a dingy big enough to hold the people going to shore.

  14. #14
    Member JR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    I just use a raft, all those other systems seem to require way more line and stuff that I want to clutter my boat up with. I will say that I am ordering a anchor buddy to use for my raft though. That seems like a great way to get the raft off the beach away from the bears, but I wonder if a bear would chew on my tag line to the raft. Maybe some small stainless cable would make a good tag line.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

  15. #15
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,080

    Default

    I dont have a raft, would be a handy but a lot more to haul around than some extra line, which is always a good idea anyway. Plenty of good ideas here, no one system is perfect, it Just depends on how big a boat and how much time you spend in tidal areas.
    For me its not alot or should I say not enough..........!

    The line and anchor are items I already have in the boat, and while it sounds complicated, its actually quite simple. But it is not perfect for every situation........
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  16. #16
    Member Arcticmayhem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    154

    Default

    I agree AKgramps, lots of good ideas, but no perfect or easy ways to do it. It looks like the anchor buddy is worth trying though. I found 2 websites with some systems worth trying as well, but they do require a lot of extra rope. The first is something like I was thinking, and the second is an idea that I never thought of, but could be built easy enough. What do you guys think?

    http://neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/

    http://www.boatbits.org/index.html

  17. #17
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    It has been mentioned, but I will make sure to state it one more time. There is a lot of seaweed out there and I have to clear my line about every day and it is hard to remove. I can't see a line fouled with that stuff running through that steel box device. If you decide to try one of these keep a suit on shore for the person that might have to swim to the boat.

    I once tried to swim 100 yards to my boat and almost drown because my arms and legs stopped working due to the cold.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  18. #18
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I might try to copy the boat bits system using one of these and a good sized clevis attached to replace the pulley. This is the part that stays on your anchor rode to use a buoy to recover your anchor. It too locks onto the rode and by using a large clevis even a fouled line would feed through.




    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Ancho...h-All+Products
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  19. #19
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    I don't use floating line for 2 reasons, although where I use my setup I shouldn't have to worry about another boat passing between my boat and shore it concerns me. Secondly, there is too much crap floating on top of the water.

    I would agree with Stid to have a back up plan in case of an issue, in our case the one time we had an issue (we weren't really prepared for) I much prefered using an air mattress vs getting in that cold arse water, well, at least my son did

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •