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Thread: Buying a used recurve tips

  1. #1
    Member schmidty_dog's Avatar
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    Default Buying a used recurve tips

    Hey all, I have been shooting compound for a few years now and always had an interest in traditional bows. Recently I've found two recurves for sale in my area that seem pretty cheap, a Bear Kodiak Magnum and Pearson Golden Sovereign Emperor. Both are for sale for $50 to 75 asking price. Anyways, I wanted some tips if I were to go look at these bows to make sure they aren't defective or something.

    For what its worth I don't know squat really about recurves, so I was honestly looking at making offers on both and trying both out if they are shooters to see which suits me. I'm 6' 2'' tall with some pretty long arms so I know shorter bows might be a problem for me. The Pearson is 66'' and the Bear is 52'' I believe. The Pearson also doesn't have a string on it right now so I'd have to get a new string for it. Any ways to test or check a bow out with no string?

    Thanks all, schmidty

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    I've got a Bear Grizzly 50# here and far prefer it to the 62" Cub target bow; I've got long hammer-swingers as well, and seem to get less string-slap with the shorter bow, don't know why (not bad form, hopefully). 'Bout same accuracy with both. I'd be leery about buying a bow without being able to shoot it, but for $50 it's not that big a deal. Check 'em for cracks or delamination is probably all you need to do.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  3. #3

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    schmidty,
    Both may be collectors. The Pearson is mid 1960's. The big question is what poundage? Are there any cracks in the limbs? Look where the string hits the curve. Look down the sides for any delaminations or any deep gouges in the limbs. Check to see if the tips line up. The Pearson is probably a light weight target bow. I wouldn't get a tradition bow heavier than 50 pounds if its your first. Lighter bows help you develop proper form. At $50 and $75 you can always get your money back. Good luck.

  4. #4

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    With the bow strung up draw it a couple times then look at each end to make sure the string is still in the center of the limb. That will let you know that the bow is not sprung. I have a Bear Kodiak Magnum and love it. I have owned it 20 years and it still shoots good.

  5. #5
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    What the other's have said is hard to add to other than to remember that it was very popular for recurves to be strung using the foot to secure the lower limb and pushing with the knee to bend and then sliding the string to the upper (versus using a stringer which allows for much better alignment). It works well but can twist the limbs- so again like Cast Iron suggested- make sure to look for alignment. Also most of the traditional bows were rated at poundage at 28 inch draw, so a long armed archer can add about 12 pounds over the listed weight (if indeed anchoring the same as usual).

    Traditional is a blast- although it takes a LOT more practice and your idea of a long shot will quickly become humbling!

    Have fun.
    BEE

  6. #6
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    I've had considerable experience with recurve bows, including Bear's Kodiak and his Magnum. The shorter limbs tend to pinch the fingers, especially with a long-arm draw. I've seen pretty good bow hunters actually have the string slip from the tips because it was easy to twist the limbs during a hurried draw on a live animal when shooting the Kodiak. With those two provisos, either should be a quite serviceable bow if there is nothing wrong with the limbs. Serious banging of the limbs sometimes crack or crush the fiberglass facing along the edges, which would weaken the limb to some extent. Just look them over carefully. Good buys, though.

  7. #7
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    Check out www.rmsgear.com Those guys are great. I've bought a few used bows from them.
    Alpine is awesome...

  8. #8

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    limb twist isnt much of an issue. Twist it back! just stay away from heat!!!, dry or water!

    Cracks are a major concern! look in the high stress areas (end of riser, limb tips, or any other bends in the limbs due to design), along the edges from one end to the other looking for hairlines in the laminations. Any gouges into the glass, or deep scratches can lead to problems in older bows.

    as for string pinch I also agree..I dont like shorter bows..but just because you are a big guy doesnt mean you'll have a long draw with a tradbow. It all depends on your style of shooting honestly! I know two well known much taller bowshooters than with a shorter draw than I! A more verticle Rickie Welch style will get you a longer draw.....a Asbell style hunched over will get you a much shorter draw...asbell is 6' plus and has a much shorter drawn than I do....

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