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Thread: The longest minute..

  1. #1
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    Default The longest minute..

    The longest minute, by Doug White provides what can happen on a Moose hunt, or any hunt. As far as I've know its true. Many of you have most likely read the story and viewed the photos. Many lessons in this one and capibilities of a handgun when needed. Excellent photos and well written. Occured last fall. www.siloutdoors.com/showthread.php?t=80

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    Yes, this is true, and a good example where a handgun saved their lives. They left their rifles in the boat because they got complacient and if you have ever packed out a moose, saving as much weight as you can is the way we all go. Leaving your rifle if you have a handgun is common, but I don't, for this very reason. The ONLY time I only have a handgun with me up here is if I am just fishing, hiking or in the bush other than hunting. And on some of these occasions, I carry a rifle, if in griz or brown bear country.

    The odds of this happening is very small, but the threat is real and it is best to be prepared. They were lucky that .44 bullet hit the golden spot that took it down.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

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    Thanks for posting a link to that story. I had not read it, I will go on my first moose hunt this fall. It opened my eyes a little bit. Make sure I have a guard when dressing my moose.

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    Thumbs up

    People will say it was a lucky shot, I like to think of it as a rapid well place shot, my guess is that he was aiming for nothing but the bear. Some will dispute the stopping power of a 44, but dead bears tell no lies. Practice, Practice....

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    Everything turned out positive in the story. I enjoyed the read. However, I think it has great insight into what NOT to do at a kill site.

    1. If you hang your weapon up away from you.... you might as well not bring it.

    2. Leaving the rifles. Sure it saves weight, but see #1.

    3. Be familiar with all the weapons in your party, and how to use/unholster them. A panic situation is no time to learn.

    4. They only had the rounds that were in the revolver, with no extras. Good thing one did the job.

    These are just a few, and I'm not trying to judge those that were in the situation, but I think they would tell anyone what they could have done better. They were just lucky the bear wasn't ripping them apart. Sounds like the bear was just as confused as they were. I've gutted/parted out moose in griz country. It takes a long time to work a moose up. Plenty of time for Mr. Griz to check you out and decide whether or not he want to play nice. Furthermore, the 44 mag is all I carry. I trust it. Bigger may be better, but the 44 (with proper loads) will anchor the best of them.
    "The rich... who are content to buy what they have not the skill to get by their own excellence, these are the real enemies of game".... Theodore Roosevelt's A Principle of the Hunt

  6. #6

    Default .44 in Alaska

    Yeah, but a handgun is better than nothing, and even though it was a lucky shot, it did the trick, so it was the right thing to have at that moment. I personally carry a .454 Casull Ruger now, but carried a .44 Mag here in Alaska for nearly 20 years, and never regretted it.

    I know some who carry 10MM's and .357 Magnums, but I shudder at that up here. For black bears, these are fine, but a griz is a different critter altogether. Personally, I would carry nothing smaller than a .44 up here, and as has been discussed at length, any handgun pales in comparison to even a medium caliber gun, such as a .30-06.

    Barko, good luck this fall. Yes, it is very prudent to have another there with you and within reach of a gun if dressing any animal. A bear can and will be on you and you won't know it until he wants his presence known to you, usually at the last second. ALWAYS be vigilant and take turns watching and butchering in the field.

    And more than anything KNOW HOW TO USE THE WEAPON YOU CHOOSE!!!!!!!! It could be the difference between life and death, as this story shows. They were danged lucky.
    Now just why in the hell do I have to press "1" for English???

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    akndres:

    I certainly agree with you. There's are valuable lessons to be learned from this incident.

    Smitty of the North

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