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Thread: VFR Altitudes back and forth to SW

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    Member RocketRick's Avatar
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    Default VFR Altitudes back and forth to SW

    Are most off you guys following the altitudes based on Mag Bearing or?

    IOW, odd thousands plus 500 for easterly courses, and even
    thousands plus 500 for westerly courses. Use your magnetic
    course, not your magnetic heading.

    Just trying to not have a mid-air.

    Rick

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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketRick View Post
    Are most off you guys following the altitudes based on Mag Bearing or?

    IOW, odd thousands plus 500 for easterly courses, and even
    thousands plus 500 for westerly courses. Use your magnetic
    course, not your magnetic heading.

    Just trying to not have a mid-air.

    Rick
    Of course - - - - - weather permitting .......................

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    Plus try to stay on the car traffic (right) side of passes and canyons. Of course since I am usually flying floats, I get a nose bleed if I go over 800 ft AGL.
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    Make sure your on the right freq for the area your in, Talk a lot , up river, down river, let side , right side you get the point.
    I never seem to high enough for VFR altitudes anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Plus try to stay on the car traffic (right) side of passes and canyons. Of course since I am usually flying floats, I get a nose bleed if I go over 800 ft AGL.
    Hey, Float Pilot, I hope you'll let me get away with continuing to use the upwind side of the valley . . . . . and above 800' I get a nosebleed and become disoriented at the loss of familiar landmarks.

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    I try to fly on the updraft side, as long as it is not so severe that I cannot control things. The problem arises when the guys flying the other way also want the same updraft. I like it when we pass each other down both our left sides. So we can keep an eye on each other if we are driving spam cans with the pilot seat on the left side.. Plus I want enough room to make a 180 degree turn, preferably towards descending terrain.

    I was flying up through Canada late one winter and was trapped in one of those long narrow valleys with a frozen lake running along the length of it... I was getting my butt beat by super updrafts and down drafts, plus lots of blowing snow. The only place I could stay level was right next to the lake surface hugging the trees to block the wind.

    Of course where the updrafts appear depends on a few conditions. I made up a photo for some of my clients when we discuss this..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I try to fly on the updraft side, as long as it is not so severe that I cannot control things. The problem arises when the guys flying the other way also want the same updraft. I like it when we pass each other down both our left sides. So we can keep an eye on each other if we are driving spam cans with the pilot seat on the left side.. Plus I want enough room to make a 180 degree turn, preferably towards descending terrain.

    I was flying up through Canada late one winter and was trapped in one of those long narrow valleys with a frozen lake running along the length of it... I was getting my butt beat by super updrafts and down drafts, plus lots of blowing snow. The only place I could stay level was right next to the lake surface hugging the trees to block the wind.

    Of course where the updrafts appear depends on a few conditions. I made up a photo for some of my clients when we discuss this..
    Good photos - - - and accurate. Ever fly the "Standing Wave" up through the Owns Valley from LAX to Lake Tahoe or Reno? Guaranteed to clear your sinuses . . .

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    Nope, I have only been into Reno from the east side. Up that little valley that passes over Tiger Field and then up to Sparks.

    If I had to get fuel along that route I preferred to tank-up at Yerington or Carson City. It is flat and far less traffic. If not I would just head further north and stop at Susanville CA. From there up to Klamath Falls or Maybe Sun-River Oregon if I had enough fuel. I do not know what the folks around Sun-River do for a living, but it is kinda pretty in that area.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Nope, I have only been into Reno from the east side. Up that little valley that passes over Tiger Field and then up to Sparks.

    If I had to get fuel along that route I preferred to tank-up at Yerington or Carson City. It is flat and far less traffic. If not I would just head further north and stop at Susanville CA. From there up to Klamath Falls or Maybe Sun-River Oregon if I had enough fuel. I do not know what the folks around Sun-River do for a living, but it is kinda pretty in that area.
    Ah, indeed it is !!!

  10. #10

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    On the rare occasions I am above 3,000 ft, I try to hit appropriate VFR altitudes. But mostly I hold right of lakeshores, rivers, passes, etc., look for opposite traffic, and if necessary find the updraft side of things. I don't ever fly down the middle of anything...I also monitor and use the radio...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I try to fly on the updraft side, as long as it is not so severe that I cannot control things. .
    Will the updrafts exist on both sides of the valley going up slope even tho the prevailing or higher winds might be perpedicular to the valley?

    RR

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    Usually not. But weird things can happen, particularly when two or three narrow valleys all meet in one spot. (the washing machine effect)
    I like early mornings for valley and canyon flying. The air is usually dead calm with little stratus layers here and there. While the layers might restrict your altitude, calm winds make my wife happy...
    It seems that after 11 Am or so, the heat of the day makes the winds start to kick in....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Usually not. But weird things can happen, particularly when two or three narrow valleys all meet in one spot. (the washing machine effect)
    I like early mornings for valley and canyon flying. The air is usually dead calm with little stratus layers here and there. While the layers might restrict your altitude, calm winds make my wife happy...
    It seems that after 11 Am or so, the heat of the day makes the winds start to kick in....
    I know that but didn't stink of it. Ha!.

    Very good advice. I'll leave abt 6 or 7am and its only abt 3-hrs there. Yep...that will work weather permitting.

    Flying back following a twin just abv the trees thru LCPass was scary but fun Ha! Back then, in '83, there wasn't many planes going thru. I wonder about now. Maybe its safer to go over the top?

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    Oddly enough they just had a news article about pass flying on the late night news a day or two ago.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Oddly enough they just had a news article about pass flying on the late night news a day or two ago.
    I didn't see that.

    What I want is real time weather that I can afford in the bush and radar to see other planes.

    The Next-Gen technology, ADS-B, has to be in the planes in Class A,B C airspace by 2020 I think it is. You can get it now. Either one channel and now a 2-channel Transceiver.

    If i get current weather I'll be happy. But according to the AOPA you still have to keep your transponder. That may change tho

    Coverage is at;

    http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...coverage01.png

    AOPA articcle is at:

    http://www.aopa.org/advocacy/article...00527adsb.html

    RR

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    Well ifn ya cant do that then do this;

    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/defa...?bandID=945939

    Rocket

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    Quote Originally Posted by RocketRick View Post
    I didn't see that.

    What I want is real time weather that I can afford in the bush and radar to see other planes.

    The Next-Gen technology, ADS-B, has to be in the planes in Class A,B C airspace by 2020 I think it is. You can get it now. Either one channel and now a 2-channel Transceiver.

    If i get current weather I'll be happy. But according to the AOPA you still have to keep your transponder. That may change tho

    Coverage is at;

    http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...coverage01.png

    AOPA articcle is at:

    http://www.aopa.org/advocacy/article...00527adsb.html

    RR


    From the published areas covered,
    this requirement seems as silly as the restriction against firearms in an airplane. While Alaska law used to require the pilot to carry firearms and ammunition, and every hunter, guide, charter pilot, and almost every other Alaska pilot HAD to carry firearms in the airplane, the law prohibited it. Now comes a requirement for a piece of $20,000 equipment that is useful to only those aircraft in Alaska flying above 1,500 feet. That would omit a serious number of Alaska flights !!!
    Clearly a cost beneficial only to the government, it seems to me.




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    thats right., thats what ya get for being a **** CAP tit sucker and relying on the FEds to suck my taxes into your brain = military scum sucking pigs.

    thats the bottom line..

    Like a chief of boat of an aircrafter-carreyer said..F 'em All//

    RR


    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post


    From the published areas covered,
    this requirement seems as silly as the restriction against firearms in an airplane. While Alaska law used to require the pilot to carry firearms and ammunition, and every hunter, guide, charter pilot, and almost every other Alaska pilot HAD to carry firearms in the airplane, the law prohibited it. Now comes a requirement for a piece of $20,000 equipment that is useful to only those aircraft in Alaska flying above 1,500 feet. That would omit a serious number of Alaska flights !!!
    Clearly a cost beneficial only to the government, it seems to me.




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