Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Shrimping ??

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    99

    Default Shrimping ??

    What do you need to do to be able to drop a pot in the sound?
    Where/how do you get a permit? Cost?
    How many pots can you drop.
    Thanks for any help.

    Would like to just drop one pot and try it.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    You need a fishing license and then can get a shrimping permit from AF&G, the permits are free. You are allowed 5 pots per vessel. There are requirements for marking the buoy per AF&G.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...cshellfish.pdf
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    99

    Default

    Thanks Paul!
    What depths do you usually drop them in?
    Anything to look for?
    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    400-450', steep terrain and being near the terminus of a glacier seems to help.

    Dropping the pots is the easy part, it's pulling them up that is either tough or expensive.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  5. #5

    Default

    yeah without a pot-puller it's a lot of work and even with one it's a lot of work. It's fun (and productive) if you know the spots, but it's backbreaking and depressing if you don't. Nothing like pulling up 400 foot of rope to find an old shoe and an octopus a-la Forrest Gump before the hurricanes.

  6. #6

    Default

    If you can't afford a pot puller you might want to try one of those little devices called an "anchor lift"---it has a sliding bolt inside of it that lets your line run free in one direction and locks down on it when your line runs the other way. You run your anchor line through it, attach a big red buoy to it and then run your boat away from it and it lifts the anchor. Cabelas sells them and if you go to their website and do a search for "anchor lift" it should show up. I have an aluminum one a good friend of mine sold me, but the one Cabelas sells is made of high impact nylon. I don't know how durable it is, but they only cost a little above $20. I use mine to pull my crab pots up and it works wonderfully. Yeah, you still have to pull all the line in by hand, but it's all on the surface and sure beats having to pull a pot up from the bottom. Especially 400 or so feet down.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  7. #7
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    If you can't afford a pot puller you might want to try one of those little devices called an "anchor lift"---it has a sliding bolt inside of it that lets your line run free in one direction and locks down on it when your line runs the other way. You run your anchor line through it, attach a big red buoy to it and then run your boat away from it and it lifts the anchor. Cabelas sells them and if you go to their website and do a search for "anchor lift" it should show up. I have an aluminum one a good friend of mine sold me, but the one Cabelas sells is made of high impact nylon. I don't know how durable it is, but they only cost a little above $20. I use mine to pull my crab pots up and it works wonderfully. Yeah, you still have to pull all the line in by hand, but it's all on the surface and sure beats having to pull a pot up from the bottom. Especially 400 or so feet down.
    It's a good idea for a guy on the cheap. B&J Commercial here in Anchorage has the metal ones that will last. The biggest problem is not pulling them too fast. The shrimp are pretty soft bodied and it doesn't take alot of pressure to pull them out of their shells and through the pot grates. That's why after two years of using them I finally broke down and bought a puller. My catch rates have gone way up and I don't find any shells in my traps like I use to when using the "anchor lift" method. Also, in order to move slow enough to not pull them through the grates you'll need more than a buoy on the line. I used a drift sock and buoy and it worked okay.

  8. #8
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    If you are going to drop a pot you should put a rope to it - makes for easier more proven retrieval!

    I tied a 5 gallon bucket on to my bouy to hold it back when I pulled the bouy method. I don't like it though - too much stress on that little rope. You never really know when to stop. I bought a scotty pully for crab/shrimp pots and pull by hand now. Much less stressful and a bit more of an upper body workout.

    One of these days I am going to grajeyate to a full size boat and I'll git me one a them thar cat heads to do ma pullin fer me........! I probably won't get to go out much them - I'll have to work too much so as it'll take all of my fishin time up.

    I currently have a boat that go past gas stations without much stoppin...some of these guys run boats that can't make it past one at all.

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    One of the issues of using the anchor puller is not only can you pull the pot too fast, but when you have that 100 fathoms of line on the surface and you are pulling the pots to the boat by hand you'll be washing shrimp out of the pots as they can and will get through the openings in the mesh.

    A good steady verticle pull is going to give the best yield of shrimp. It's tough to take the hit of the cost of a set of pots, line, buoy's and a puller all at once, but pulling a pot or two by hand or with an anchor puller and getting a few or a dozen shrimp get's frustrating fast. Whereas using a puller and getting several gallons of shrimp sure makes it worthwhile.

    I started out with two puts and hand pulling and couldn't figure out why people would go through so much work to get a dozen shrimp. Then was fortunate to borrow a friends puller the following season and a set of pots. The first pull yielded a gallon of tails that we cooked up on the beach right after we'd pulled them.

    I'd say shrimping without a puller is like fishing without a reel. It can be done, but you're not likely to enjoy the experience.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    The biggest problem is not pulling them too fast. The shrimp are pretty soft bodied and it doesn't take alot of pressure to pull them out of their shells and through the pot grates.
    Yeah, actually now that you mention it I was talking to a buddy of mine that used to shrimp all the time and he had the same reservations about using that method. I don't think it's a real issue when pulling tanners up from the depths.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

  11. #11
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I'd say shrimping without a puller is like fishing without a reel. It can be done, but you're not likely to enjoy the experience.
    Never heard it put that way but my dad and I certainly agree. Couldn't have put it better myself.

  12. #12
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    One has to have experienced it both ways to appreciate the saying.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  13. #13
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    947

    Default

    Pulled 5 Ladner pots, 450 feet of sinking line, 2 12 pound anchors, one at each end of the set, by hand, Never again.
    2000 Bayliner Ciera Express 2452
    5.0 Mercruiser Alpha 1

  14. #14
    Member jojomoose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    312

    Default

    I am not experienced as some of you are but the guy who taught me how to pull shrimp pots without a puller must have taught me well. I use the anchor bouy with a slip ring and bring them up in a gentle circle motion. I have never had a problem...maybe one day i will be able to afford a bigger boat and a pot puller.

    JoJo

  15. #15
    Member Floridascuba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I'd say shrimping without a puller is like fishing without a reel. It can be done, but you're not likely to enjoy the experience.
    I fished the cuban way. With what they call Yo Yo's. It's different. But fun.

    Attachment 59334

  16. #16
    Member Floridascuba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    191

    Default

    and this is what I used before I bought a brute line hauler.

    Attachment 59335

  17. #17
    Member Roger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sunshine Alaska
    Posts
    2,050

    Default

    Used this Ebay find for the first time this week did great hauling up 2 pots with 6lbs of weight

    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  18. #18
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,841

    Default

    That is an interesting little puller. Hope it serves you well.

    I am taking my 23 year old pot puller with me for his birthday next weekend - it costs more to feed him for three days than buying a pot puller would!

    I am most certain that some shrimp get out of the pot when you are pulling them up with the bouy method. I watch the little bugs get out when I am lifting my pots out of the water sometimes.......no doubt that the water going through the pot pushes them out the netting when you pull them at 12mph with the boat - even in circles, then as mentioned above - you have to get back to the pots while coiling up the line shot......

    I get more bugs by hand than I did with a bouy. This scotty puller really helps though - http://www.scotty.com/fishing-gear-e...s/trapease.htm

  19. #19

    Default

    Yep, the scotty trap-ease helps alot when pulling by hand....but nothing beats a puller.


    Heavy Hitter Fishing
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Heavy...54441957966186

    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro-Staff


  20. #20
    Member captaindd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Salcha, AK
    Posts
    762

    Default

    Back in the mid 80's I pulled 1 halibut skated 4 times during a 24 hour openner by hand. The second openner I took a gas power Ice auger and mounted it side ways on a home buildt frame with a drum and that worked great. You can purchase a capstand on EBAy for $300 or just build 1 using a car starter or pull your pots using a float.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •