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Thread: Boyfriend and I moving to Alaska, want to start hunting!

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    Default Boyfriend and I moving to Alaska, want to start hunting!

    I was born and raised in Anchorage and just got into hunting over the last year while Tyler is from WA and has hunted all his life there. I'm moving back in a few weeks and would like to pursue hunting for just about anything (personally stand offish on bear or wolf, but Tyler probably isn't). Whats the best way to start hunting in a completely new area for something you've never hunted for before?

    Personally, I'd like to find someone to become friends with to show me the ropes, or maybe just some advice on where I'm able to hunt, if I should get a guide the first couple times for moose, where to hunt for hare, ptarmigan, etc. Thanks for any and all advice!!
    ~Krystal

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    Member SANDRAT's Avatar
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    I'm very new to hunting in AK but not new to hunting.First thing I would do is figure out what you would like to hunt the most,then do your research on that particular critter and don't be afraid to ask questions.The other thing is a suitable rifle/shotgun and plenty of gear for the conditions you will be hunting in.

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    When you do arrive at the place you want to give it a go, put as much to memorie as possible, as knowing your hunting grounds is very important, and repeated visits will give you a better command of the Hunt in general, as well as be a bit safer in the long run.
    Find places you can access at the least expense so you can go back again and again, Looking ahead, try to develope, over the years, at least three different areas you like to hunt, and you will have a fall back when a population dips in one area, depening on what you wanna hunt.


    Keep on Huntin'.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Default Your first year living here, fish and game will still call you a non resident

    gr8 advice to you so far. Here is one more:

    Your first year here or so (read the regs; then read the regs again; they're really tough to figure if you're not a lawyer), to see what you want to hunt that requires huge fees your first year here because even though you're living here, they'll call you a non-resident for hunting purposes.

    On these huge-fee hunts, don't buy the huge-fee permits, but go hunting anyway - just, take your camera instead of your rifle. There is a heckuva lot to be learned by a person that knows hunting but not Alaska-hunting, that can be learned by getting afield to just try to take a picture of what you might want to shoot. And here's another bonus for you: that sit-out year, you don't have to pay any attention to the exact hunting seasons, so that opens you up to lots more trips afield.
    Last edited by FamilyMan; 04-23-2012 at 03:06. Reason: P.S. Welcome to the forums. You're in the right spot.

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    The Alaska Department of Fish and Game offers a program called "Becoming an Outdoors Woman" where a group of women learn many of the skills involved with hunting to include scouting an area, pursuing their game, marksmanship, butchering, and more. I've heard rave reviews of the program, so that might be something you want to look into.

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    Wow! Thanks for all the advice!
    they'll call you a non-resident for hunting purposes
    I know Tyler will have to wait for residency, but I maintained my residency throughout college so yay . Aside from that FamilyMan, that is awesome advice and I'll make sure to pass it on to Tyler.

    Brian M, I will definitely have to look into that! I've been thinking of how I was going to make some new friends, (especially lady friends) because I always have such a hard time, but that seems like a great place to start!

    And for everyone, it sounds like I might be waiting at least a year or so before we're able to take anything big while we're massing hunting gear for me and proper winter clothes for Tyler. I will check out the fish and game site to see if our WA hunter safety courses apply and what else we need to do to get both Tyler and I squared away on being able to hunt asap! Thanks for all the advice and for anyone else who reads this, keep it coming!

  7. #7

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    Another excellent resource is joining up with like-minded people.

    Brian's suggestion about B.O.W. is a great place to start. All of the outdoors/wildlife/conservation/hunting organizations are good resources as well, whether it be attending their functions or deciding to donate some free time and volunteering with a specific group.

    Lots of opportunities. Keep your eyes open, do some reading and research. You won't learn it all overnight, but you can certainly learn from the experiences of others and with others. In a few years, you can repay to favor by taking a new hunter under your wing.

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    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Some great advice from Family Mann and Brian M. I've been hunting all my life and when i first moved to AK, back in the 90's, I was fortunate enough to meet a lifelong AK hunter and trapper who showed me around the area and gave me some tips on where and how moose behaved and lived as well as trapping fox and lynx. I also picked up some of the AK hunting books and read numerous magazine articles about AK hunting. I have been fortunate in harvesting a moose almost every year since becoming a resident and have trapped fox. I now have my own "Young Patawan" that I am mentoring into the AK hunting tradition. He took his first nice bull last season, but still has "much to learn, he does". I'm sure you and/or your husband will come in contact with some wise old hunter that can show you the ropes about AK hunting, or at least point you in the right direction. There are also numerous videos that are worth watching, especially the how to call moose videos, that will have valuable information about hunting specific species. I recently picked up a sheep hunting book that was written by a master sheep hunter and i'll be reading it thoroughly before heading up for sheep.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

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    Krystal907: So what are you're reasons for being stand-off-ish on Bears and wolves?

    Quote Originally Posted by happytobeinAK View Post
    Another excellent resource is joining up with like-minded people.
    Totally agree. And the issue of available modes of transportation (plane, ATV, boat, sneakers, snow machine) will certainly come up.

    Also, gear. At least for me, my lower 48 gear is a bit different than my Alaska gear. (Alaska gear tends to be more windbreaker, rain wear, and rubber boots). Start out by hiking, camping, fishing ... and the numbers of friends and experiences afield will grow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wet eNuf View Post
    Krystal907: So what are you're reasons for being stand-off-ish on Bears and wolves?
    Well, I'd like to eat everything I shoot and all the bear I've had wasn't my cup of tea. I had bear jerky once and it was awesome, so I guess if I could turn the whole thing into jerky I'd be happy haha. I eat an obscene amount of jerky so hopefully it'd last me throughout the year Wolves fall under the I'm not going to eat it category, and I think I'd have a hard time shooting something that is so similar to something I'd keep in my living room. Although, I have no problem shooting rabbits, so maybe it wouldn't be as bad as I'm thinking.

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    Krystal, if you can afford it the first thing I'd do after getting back to Anchorage is buy a nonresident hunting/fishing license. Travis too. The date on that will help when you eventually get your resident hunting license. You'll probably want to go out fishing this summer anyway. Get your AK drivers license too asap. Record your official moving-to-Alaska date with intent to remain here any way you can, rent receipts etc.

    This forum is a great place to get help down the line once you're settled in, I'm sure some perhaps wouldn't mind having help packing moose <grin>, that is a good way to learn, going out with someone else as help. You can start with small game too as a nonresident without much expense, get to know a few areas, go berry picking in the fall, hiking, things like that.

    Good luck and welcome home,





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    Thanks for the info bushrat. I am still a resident of AK since I maintained residency throughout school, Tyler is not and we probably couldn't afford a non-res license for him. I was planning on taking him to the DMV and getting his ID first thing when we got there. He'll just have to watch while I land all the fish

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    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krystal907 View Post
    Personally, I'd like to find someone to become friends with to show me the ropes, or maybe just some advice on where I'm able to hunt, if I should get a guide the first couple times for moose, where to hunt for hare, ptarmigan, etc. Thanks for any and all advice!!
    ~Krystal
    If our schedules will line up, you're welcome to join us hunting and/or fishing. While you said you weren't all that interested in bear hunting, hunting black bears in PWS is something to see. And, gallons of shrimp aren't bad side benefits, either.

    I have friends that are engineers, so they may be able to give you some contact info for folks that are looking to hire, as well.

    I can't PM you, so feel free to drop me a line at: dvretz@alaska.com

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    Something to look into Krystal: If you purchased a resident hunting license in any other state while you were outside going to school, it MIGHT make a difference in your resident status with fish and game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan in Alaska View Post
    If our schedules will line up, you're welcome to join us hunting and/or fishing. While you said you weren't all that interested in bear hunting, hunting black bears in PWS is something to see. And, gallons of shrimp aren't bad side benefits, either.

    I have friends that are engineers, so they may be able to give you some contact info for folks that are looking to hire, as well.

    I can't PM you, so feel free to drop me a line at: dvretz@alaska.com
    That would be so amazing! I'm down to experience just about anything once and I'm sure Tyler would love seeing some of Alaska that I can't show him using a car. Plus, I haven't had PWS shrimp in nearly a decade and I've been dreaming of eating some again ever since haha! Just sent off an email with my contact info. I'm looking forward to meeting you and others!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 257wby View Post
    Something to look into Krystal: If you purchased a resident hunting license in any other state while you were outside going to school, it MIGHT make a difference in your resident status with fish and game.
    I was really careful in not violating any residency things and always bought non-res everything, but I'll double check when I get back home. Just in case I'll probably run down to Fred Meyer or something and get a fishing license first thing.

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    As far as residency goes, it does not just include hunting and fishing stuff. If you did anything to take advantage of another states benefits then that voids your alaska residency. This is not something to just say, "I should be ok", it could really bite you down the road. Call the AK Troopers and tell them your situation and they will make sure. Better safe than sorry...

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    I am definitely going to check up on things when I get there, don't get me wrong. The only thing that would have me on the fence would be not taking full time classes last year. My permanent address is still in Anchorage, I've paid out of state tuition all years, registered to vote in AK, all fishing licenses are non-res, etc. I appreciate the concern though.

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    Default Keeping records of AK residency steps

    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Get your AK drivers license too asap. Record your official moving-to-Alaska date with intent to remain here any way you can, rent receipts etc.
    This is great advice bushrat gave, for more than just outdoors activities.

    It's likely that you both will want to file for the yearly PFD when you're eligible (like 1.5 or so, plus or minus, years after you're been here permanently). The first year that you file, they put you through "heck", to weed out the ones that just got off the boat yesterday and will leave tomorrow.

    I forget all the questions, but they include you having records for all that bushrat said, plus the exact date that you registered your car with AK plates, the date you signed either a rental or purchase agreement on a place to live, the exact date you registered to vote in AK, and more.

    It is probably worth researching the exact questions they're now asking (its likely that they change over time) so that you'll not only be legal to hunt/fish as a resident, but also collect about a grand each from the yearly PFD fund payout to each resident.

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    Thanks for your reply. I'll make sure to keep track of all of Tyler's residency stuff. I tried looking online for a basic checklist of "things to do to become a resident," but of course it'd never be that easy :P I'm going to have him register his truck, get his AK license, and anything else (such as filing for PFD). I will buy my resident fishing license just to have it on record that I'M BACK!

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