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Thread: 168tsx vs 180tsx 300 wthrby

  1. #1

    Default 168tsx vs 180tsx 300 wthrby

    Well ive slowly building this rifle, bought a synthetic 300 win mag and had the barrel swapped to a ss 24" pac-nor rechambered for 300 wthrby. It is currently gettin the barrel floated and glass bedded so its time to see what you guys are runnin for loads. I love the 168s in 06 but a 180 moving 3000+ sure will have some whack. I know the BC is better with 180s but i can get the 168s goin bout 200-300 fps faster.if you havent noticed i like speed, and believe speed kills..ive searched but havent seen to much for 300 on here..mainly lookin gor powders and seatin depths

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    I used to use 180's in the weatherby but am in the middle of trying out the 168's. I have three loads worked up but have not fired them. I agree, speed kills and kills real good with a tuff bullet like Barnes. The 168's should fly flatter and I don't think there small enough to make a big difference in wind drift, I could be wrong. I am trying H1000 and even Varget. The Varget worked pretty good in the 06 with 168 TSX bullets.

  3. #3

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    My buddy loved his 168s!. Max book charge of rl 19..1" groups@ 100. Which is nothing to brag about..i need to do some more shootin, because with storbought winchester 180 silvertips i can drive some holes(30-06). Im really stoked for wthrby to be done..should be a rifle, i can pretty much do anything with. I wonder if i will have any issues with mag box holdin the longer barnes bullets..especially is seated out..? Its a rem 700 action

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    I believe the over the top magnums like the 300 why and 300 RUM are used for their maximum potential when loaded for flat shooting. At speeds of 3300 fps, there is hardly anything that won't get a full dose of copper poisoning to 400 yards or more. I load my 300 RUM with 168 ttsx bullets just for that reason. The same bullet going 300 fps slower in a 300 win will kill everything dead just fine, so why not even faster? Food for thought, have you tried the etips or GMS guilding metal bullets? On paper, the 180 etips can go about the same velocity as the 168 ttsx. Same velocity with a bigger bullet is a winner. Also, Barnes has a LRX bullet at 172 grains. If you are on the fence, you can split the difference. I have not tried them but bet they are long and pointy. Box length would be an issue. Of course it only matters what shoots good. If you are sub MOA and goodly velocity, then leave the range happy.

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    yea sounds good. it chambers 180 partitions fine, but i havent had a chance to load up any barnes for it.

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    Anyone have any issues seatin a tsx to the rifling....and having issues fittin in mag box.? In a 700 action

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    I had my magazine box opened up to help with that very problem. I just got the gun back (Remington 700 action) and have not begun the testing yet for bullets closer to the lands. Is the ogive on the tsx closer than the ttsx? The B.C. is lower for the tsx's but it might make up for it in accuracy by getting things closer to the "Sweet Spot".

  8. #8

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    Well the ttsx is a longer round isnt it?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt/trapak88 View Post
    Anyone have any issues seatin a tsx to the rifling....and having issues fittin in mag box.? In a 700 action
    Barnes bullets are meant to be seated off of the lands. IIRC it's .050

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    Quote Originally Posted by fkroosher View Post
    Barnes bullets are meant to be seated off of the lands. IIRC it's .050
    I was always taught and have had good luck with ' kissin' the LANS leaving less room for the round to jump into the rifling.

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    Unlike other bullets, the TSX's do better when seated further off the lands as recommended by Barnes and already mentioned by a previous poster...mine are all .05+/-.

    Due to their metallurgical composition, TSX's are longer than other manufacturer's bullets of the same weight.

    I do not know if the ogive of the TTSX is the same as the TSX..I suspect it is, but you could ask the lead technician (Ty) at Barnes through their web-site. He is very helpful.

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    How far do you plan to shoot? Out at the 4-500 yd range the heavier bullets take over and any speed that you had at the muzzle with you 168s is pretty much gone. The lighter bullets may have more speed but they won't hit as hard. besides you can always have the problem of too much speed for the bullet, I have found that an Accubond running over 3050 doesn't expand fast enough and will get a pass through without the wound channel a mushroom would have produced.
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    I'd look really hard at the 200 grain Accubond to hunt everything. It's a smasher at any hunting distance. And that Wby is more than enough gun to take full advantage of the .588 BC. It's not all about muzzle velocity. It's about energy and velocity that is retained at the target. As soon as the bullet leaves the muzzle the velocity bleeds off. A higher BC bullet loses velocity slower, meaning that when the bullet hits the target it has more retained velocity and energy. Muzzle velocity doesn't kill, retained velocity and energy along with momentum does.

    So when the physics all shake out, a high BC heavy bullet will usually outweigh the increased velocity benefit from a lighter bullet. This isn't always true, though. If you look at the difference between the .308 cal 168 and 180. You can usually beat the performance of the 180 by driving a 168 faster due to the small BC difference, but if you compare either of them to the 200 Accubond, both pale in comparison downrange.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt/trapak88 View Post
    I was always taught and have had good luck with ' kissin' the LANS leaving less room for the round to jump into the rifling.
    Don't do it with the Barnes. It will be a waste of time and money. Start at .50 of the lands and play from there. I didn't read that part on some 06 rounds and did as I usually do, seating at the lands. Those bullets would not group to save the world. Once seated .50 off, it was all good from there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fkroosher View Post
    Barnes bullets are meant to be seated off of the lands. IIRC it's .050
    Quote Originally Posted by hunt/trapak88 View Post
    I was always taught and have had good luck with ' kissin' the LANS leaving less room for the round to jump into the rifling.
    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    Don't do it with the Barnes. It will be a waste of time and money. Start at .50 of the lands and play from there. I didn't read that part on some 06 rounds and did as I usually do, seating at the lands. Those bullets would not group to save the world. Once seated .50 off, it was all good from there.
    There's no way to know where the bullets will shot best until you give them a go. I've found that kissing the lands is a great place to start for best accuracy, but I've seen the TSX (X, XBT, XLC, TTSX, etc.) sometimes like a little jump. There is no way to know until you put some down your barrel......
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  16. #16

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    If you call Barnes Bullets they will tell you to start about .050 off the lands, so you will still have to find the best seating depth for your rifle. I think the big Weatherby case would work best with a 180 or 200 grain bullet.

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    I was finally able to test out the Weatherby and the 168 TTSX bullets and I am very impressed. It really softened the recoil and made it a fun rifle. I used H4350 powder and without playing with seating depths much I was getting just over an inch group at 100 yds. I know thats not super accurate but I have a feeling I can clean it up a bit with seating depths and maybe adding another grain or two of powder. I would bet that with me not flinching it will be more accurate in the field though!
    I seated the bullet to the books published COAL. I loaded a few at the max magazine length where it still functions but have not tested them yet. The groups started ok, got worse with more powder and then closed up again once I got to my max load of I think 79 grains. I had no signs of over pressure and the cases looked great. I used Nosler custom brass and Federal 215 primers.

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    Speed kills when the cartridge is matched to the game, provided the animal is not too big. Once an animal reaches a certain size or weight, speed means nothing. Reliable & repeatable killing requires about 2400 fps with a well constructed bullet of about 286gr or more in bore size of 9.3 & bigger. A s.d of around .300. I love my 300 Weatherby, I have had it longer than any other rifle & hunted with it more. But the longer I hunt the more I know that Elmer Keith knew what he was talking about. If i had to stare down an angry Bull or Bear I would rather have my 9.3x62 with 286gr North Fork @ 2500 fps. If they turn & run & the shot need deep penetration & bone breaking, it is no contest at all.

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    Speed kills when the cartridge is matched to the game, provided the animal is not too big. Once an animal reaches a certain size or weight, speed means nothing. Reliable & repeatable killing requires about 2400 fps with a well constructed bullet of about 286gr or more in bore size of 9.3 & bigger. A s.d of around .300. I love my 300 Weatherby, I have had it longer than any other rifle & hunted with it more. But the longer I hunt the more I know that Elmer Keith knew what he was talking about. If i had to stare down an angry Bull or Bear I would rather have my 9.3x62 with 286gr North Fork @ 2500 fps. If they turn & run & the shot need deep penetration & bone breaking, it is no contest at all. A big hole in & a bigger hole out..

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