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Thread: Float hunting off the Haul road

  1. #1
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    Default Float hunting off the Haul road

    We are hoping to do a haul road hunt this year and are having a bit of a hard time deciding just what's the best way to go about it. I have a 17ft Alaskan series with a 40hp. I'm not sure if this is a realistic boat for floating this area or if it's too big. It seems some of the waters are a little shallow. Also, part of the group is bow certified and part is not. Any tips?

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    Unless you're getting flown in and dropped off (in which case you don't need the outboard), your best options are to use your set up to shuttle back and forth across the Sag River or to run up the lower Ivishak River. Plenty of guys do both. How many in your group? Not sure how far up the Ivishak you have to go to be outside the 5 mile corridor. Are your non-bow certified buddies looking to get certified and bow hunt? Or are they wanting to hunt with rifles? If the former, they still have time and you'll have more options. If the latter, you'll either have to run up the Ivishak a ways, get flown in, or they can hike the 5 miles.

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    Thanks Shearej. There are about 6 of us and we are split down the middle as to who will hunt with bows. I think we're all bringing rifles regardless. Just be nice to have a bow in case that option comes up. I actually just bought my first bow and am getting started so I'm not sure if I'll be ready by August.

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    yeah, and wouldn't try an outboard unless it's a jet unit. shallow steps getting onto the Ivishak. I've seen prop strikes close the deal for some guys. Only on high water years have they been successful. Once on the Ivishak, the channel is usually deep in most places for the first 20 miles, but with some shallow riffle that might bite ya with a prop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Bartlett View Post
    yeah, and wouldn't try an outboard unless it's a jet unit. shallow steps getting onto the Ivishak. I've seen prop strikes close the deal for some guys. Only on high water years have they been successful. Once on the Ivishak, the channel is usually deep in most places for the first 20 miles, but with some shallow riffle that might bite ya with a prop.
    Yeah I've been looking through the forum and watching some YouTube videos. Starting to get a good idea of how shallow these rivers are. Maybe float trip is not a great idea for this year anyway.

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    There is also Gold Rush Adventures http://airboatfishing.com/ he runs an airboat up the Ivishak. You could call him about pricing for a drop off upriver so you could float back to the Haul road. He won't be able to get you into the Brooks though like an air taxi would.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    There is also Gold Rush Adventures http://airboatfishing.com/ he runs an airboat up the Ivishak. You could call him about pricing for a drop off upriver so you could float back to the Haul road. He won't be able to get you into the Brooks though like an air taxi would.
    So if I choose to go up with this transporter, where is a good place to get a good raft? I will be hunting with at least 1 other person possibly 2. I want to go after big Bou and maybe a grizz but I really want to hunt big bou and be away from people (for the most part).
    Hunt until you don't like it any more

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    Short of a fly in, you're just not going to get away from other hunters. The transporters make their living hauling hunters up these rivers and the more they take up the river the more money they make. Don't expect to get dropped up a river that has no one else on it. Plus there are plenty of other folks with air boats and such that are trying to get away from others. The other option is to get everyone bow certified and hunt from the road. On my first attempt, I got a fair bull and a cow and missed a nice bull at about 18 yds.

  9. #9
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    Consider renting a raft and put the bow hunters onto the Sag anywhere from DOT/Pump Station 3 on north. Plan on picking them up after the rifle hunters are done. The less weight you have in the motorized boat, the better. You are going to be pulling it over gravel bars, most likely starting about 1/4 mile from launch unless it is really high water. The Sag is strictly bow only, except in the higher areas where I hear are some really big class V rapids The biggest mistake I have seen on the slope is that folks can not sit still. Caribou migrate and are on the move all the time. Find a high piece of ground and sit and glass, glass, glass. Spend a day or two in one spot where you can watch what is going on around you.

    If you take pleanty of fuel you can also do day trips from the Pump2 launch area. The Sag is really braided in this area, but if you head up stream yu can find a spot to head straight across from the launch that gets little to no pressure and can give yo pleanty of opportunities. If you head downstream you can get near the bluffs to, and have a place to pull a rubber boat out if need be. I have heard folks have floated all the way to Deadhorse, but I have never even made it all the way to the Bluffs myself. Downside/upside of this hunt is it is all bow only unless you want to hoof it east...if the later, take a sled to drag behind you for gear and 'bou! Much easier than a pack in this terrain.

    Last, I am not sure if they require being bow certified any more on the slope. They use to have so many regulations it was crazy...but now they have opened it up to either sex and multiple animals. Check the regs. That said, if you are going to use a bow you owe it to the animals and yourself to become certified. You need to know what you are doing. You need to practice, practice, practice so your shot goes where you are aiming it and you know your limitations.

    Good luck, have fun, and maybe I will see you up there this year.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Still need to be certified

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    The sled idea is a good one if there is snow or frost, not a good idea on dry ground learned that last fall the big antlers kept getting stuck in the grass and tussocs, not worth the effort to drag, much easier to out the extra weight on my back than drag it dry

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