Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Cam Vs. wheel

  1. #1
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    between wasilla and palmer
    Posts
    1,061

    Default Cam Vs. wheel

    I picked up an old High country bow a while back. The guy told me the draw lingth was adjustable, but it turns out that it isn't. So I am now trying to sell it.

    Well one of the guys that looked at it insists that the bow has wheels and not cams. My reaction is the guy doesn't know what he is talking about, or is trying to make it sound bad to get the price lower, but maybe I am off.

    I thought a cam was essentially a wheel that when rotated on its axil would produce, for instance, a verticle movement along the verticle axis. Like how a cam shaft pushes open an engine valve.

    This bow does not have a circular Cam/wheel so I can't imagin it not being a cam.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    1,123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by big_dog60 View Post
    I picked up an old High country bow a while back. The guy told me the draw lingth was adjustable, but it turns out that it isn't. So I am now trying to sell it.

    Well one of the guys that looked at it insists that the bow has wheels and not cams. My reaction is the guy doesn't know what he is talking about, or is trying to make it sound bad to get the price lower, but maybe I am off.

    I thought a cam was essentially a wheel that when rotated on its axil would produce, for instance, a verticle movement along the verticle axis. Like how a cam shaft pushes open an engine valve.

    This bow does not have a circular Cam/wheel so I can't imagin it not being a cam.
    Wheels are round. The string follows the circular pattern.
    Cams arenít round. The string follows a more elliptical, parabolic, or egg shaped path.

    For example, take a look at Mathews bows. http://c715222.r22.cf2.rackcdn.com/c...ers-Manual.pdf
    Some of their bows have wheel at one end and a cam on the other, hence their single cam technology. On the first page of the manual, the bow has a wheel on the top and a cam on the bottom.

  3. #3
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    966

    Default

    If your bow has a "let off", then it has at least one cam. If the pull is the same to the end and no let off, wheel only...at least that is what I was told years ago.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    Wheel bows do have letoff.. the newer cam and one cam bows generally speaking have a greater letoff say 65-80% however older wheel bows were generally in the 50% range. wheel bows of old just had a softer "wall" meaning at full draw it felt really spongie and modern bows have a string stop of sorts that gives the feeling of solidity at full draw which is actually better for release shooters especially those who shoot true "back tension" release aides

  5. #5

    Default

    I shoot an older jennings with wheels, it does have a letoff, believe its only a 30% letoff though, set at 60 pounds, it definately is more challenging to aim compared to my wifes newer hoyt with cams, whichI could literally hold back for an hour if I had too...there were some hybrids type wheel cams however, based on what I've read....

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •