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Thread: What WOULD you be willing to pay for one 20 lb. halibut?

  1. #1

    Default What WOULD you be willing to pay for one 20 lb. halibut?

    So as not to clog up the "Would you pay for a second halibut?" thread I figured I'd start a new thread for this. When going through all the posts there, this question keeps popping into my head: What WOULD you be willing to pay to go out on a charter and only be able to retain one 20 lb. halibut?

    And a logical extension of that would be if your captain was willing to get each client that one halibut and then spend the rest of the time fishing for salmon or rockfish what would you be willing to pay for that service?
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    I think the other thread covered it. Going rate is the going rate and if i wanted to go i would pay what the premier charters were asking. Ultimately it is less expensive than operating your own boat and if you are a novice it will cost you a lot more in the long run to seek them out on your own. I did the math a while back and it came to about $500 for a day trip on a modest boat....about the cost of a charter.


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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    I think the other thread covered it.
    I see a lot of posts discussing the merits of paying extra to catch a second halibut, but very few (I think maybe only one) saying what they'd be willing to pay to catch just one 20 pounder. That's why I started this thread.
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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Well I don't know what I'd pay to catch 1 fish, but not the 200 to 300 dollars per person that I have seen lately.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Irregardless of the size of the fish, I honestly can't see going out on a charter where I would only be fishing for one halibut. I could see persuing a salmon shark, or a nice king salmon as a single fish charter. But let's face it, halibut are not that difficult to catch, and they really don't put up much of a fight. I love being out on the water, but if a charter was advertised as one halibut only, I'd just buy my fish commercially caught.
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    I would think that the target market would be people who now take the half-day charters to the chicken patch. For the past four or five years my in-laws have annually taken one of the half-day cattle boats out of Homer. They actually prefer the half-day gig, as my mother-in-law gets motion sickness and prefers to be back in port early. They always bring back two fish each in the 15-20 pound range, and that for the cost of ~$100 each. If it went to a one fish limit, I think charters would have to target the same kind of customers that the half-day boats target - people that want to enjoy being on the water, yet are budget conscious. I think if you offered a multi-species trip that you could still get in the $250-300 range, otherwise I think most boats would have a hard time commanding much more than $100 for a single fish unless they specifically targeted large halibut in offshore areas.

    All of the above is just a guess, though, and I don't have a personal answer to offer. I don't imagine I'd pay anything to go on a halibut charter.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    But let's face it, halibut are not that difficult to catch, and they really don't put up much of a fight. I love being out on the water, but if a charter was advertised as one halibut only, I'd just buy my fish commercially caught.
    Agreed.

    Nobody is going to offer a 1 halibut charter. First off, SE has set the precedent for a reverse slot limit. So, don't worry, you'll still have a shot at big one. Secondly.. Salmon?? Kings, cohos, pinks.. Lots of fun to catch. Lings? Yellow Eye? Black Bass?

    If a charter capt is one dimensional and can only target halibut.. well, that's his own fault. He better get schooled up on salmon fishing.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    I think most people will pay whatever is being asked, fishing on a charter is all about the experience, not the financial advantage of catching fish vs buying fish. With that being said, it would hard to keep clients happy if the captain ran out to chicken patch, got a limit of chickens, and ran back to port. If I was going to pay 300 dollars to keep 1 20lb fish, I would expect to be allowed to catch and release fish for several hours. I bet if they ever did go to a one fish under 20lb limit, those half day charters would turn into 1/3 day charters, then they could make 3 trips in a day.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    If I was going to pay 300 dollars to keep 1 20lb fish, I would expect to be allowed to catch and release fish for several hours.
    That would be the worst thing for the resource. If anything, catch and release should be banned.

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    I think those of us who live here have a different view then the majority of those who visit. A lot of tourists are even willing to buy moose poop earings...lol I think as bad as it would be there are still those willing to pay average of 200-300 or what not just for the experience and a chance to catch an Alaskan Halibut and say they did it. I do think though it would be bad to just run out limit out in an hour and run back in I think that would most certainly leave a sour taste. But as op said adding in some other fishing well I think that would make for a great day on the water. I certainly dont envy the charters of today I mean really the price of fuel at all time highs and the threats or what not of reducing the limits of catch...kind of a no win situation..

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    That would be the worst thing for the resource. If anything, catch and release should be banned.
    Why should catch and release of halibut be banned?
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    It seems that most people don't understand the full question here and I guess maybe I worded the original post incorrectly. My thinking is that people don't seem to have any problem spending from $250 or more to sit in a boat for 10 hours on the Kenai (or various other rivers in AK) in hopes of catching one king salmon or a couple of silvers. So I don't see why people wouldn't be willing to spend 10 hours or more fishing saltwater with a very strong possibility of catching one 20 lb. halibut and then spend the rest of the day trolling for a king (or two if it's the right time of year) or a couple of silvers depending on the season (not to mention other possibilities such as rockfish and/or lings).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    A lot of tourists are even willing to buy moose poop earings...lol
    You said a mouthful there, Bear!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    It seems that most people don't understand the full question here and I guess maybe I worded the original post incorrectly. My thinking is that people don't seem to have any problem spending from $250 or more to sit in a boat for 10 hours on the Kenai (or various other rivers in AK) in hopes of catching one king salmon or a couple of silvers. So I don't see why people wouldn't be willing to spend 10 hours or more fishing saltwater with a very strong possibility of catching one 20 lb. halibut and then spend the rest of the day trolling for a king (or two if it's the right time of year) or a couple of silvers depending on the season (not to mention other possibilities such as rockfish and/or lings).
    I hear you Mutt but for me the chance at one 20lb halibut is not worth much. It sure does not take long to chatch a chicken. in and out in a few hours at most. Now a trip with one halibut and a few lings with rockfish and we are in the ballpark but one halibut for 250.00 is insane in my opinion. There are too many other types of fishing for a lot less to pay that kind of money. I catch a lot of reds on the kenai for free. I think most of the people who would pay that are tourists who want to do it all and are not the serious fishermen many of us are. You can do a fly out for not much more. I love fishing halibut and my buddies have boats but there is no way i would be paying that kind of money for a chicken. Nor would i spend 275.00 for a day on the Kenai with the kings they way they are now. My buddies have river boats but we decided to leave the kings alone until the run comes back. We need every king on the gravel we can get and they dont need me CR one and tire it out so it cant take care of busines. Thats just my .02

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muttley Crew Fishing View Post
    It seems that most people don't understand the full question here and I guess maybe I worded the original post incorrectly. My thinking is that people don't seem to have any problem spending from $250 or more to sit in a boat for 10 hours on the Kenai (or various other rivers in AK) in hopes of catching one king salmon or a couple of silvers. So I don't see why people wouldn't be willing to spend 10 hours or more fishing saltwater with a very strong possibility of catching one 20 lb. halibut and then spend the rest of the day trolling for a king (or two if it's the right time of year) or a couple of silvers depending on the season (not to mention other possibilities such as rockfish and/or lings).
    That is exactly what I would expect of a single halibut charter. The ability to spend the rest of the trip chasing other species.
    If it were a single halibut only and then back to port I wouldn't pay more than $100.
    I would have no problem with $250 as long as I got to keep fishing for other species and wasn't brought in early because we had limited out on halibut.

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    Member barleydog's Avatar
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    I hear you Mutt but for me the chance at one 20lb halibut is not worth much. It sure does not take long to chatch a chicken. in and out in a few hours at most. Now a trip with one halibut and a few lings with rockfish and we are in the ballpark but one halibut for 250.00 is insane in my opinion. There are too many other types of fishing for a lot less to pay that kind of money. I catch a lot of reds on the kenai for free. I think most of the people who would pay that are tourists who want to do it all and are not the serious fishermen many of us are. You can do a fly out for not much more. I love fishing halibut and my buddies have boats but there is no way i would be paying that kind of money for a chicken. Nor would i spend 275.00 for a day on the Kenai with the kings they way they are now. My buddies have river boats but we decided to leave the kings alone until the run comes back. We need every king on the gravel we can get and they dont need me CR one and tire it out so it cant take care of busines. Thats just my .02



    Well said Kgpcr! I'd feel the same if I lived down there... I'm kind of torn on supporting charter boats anyways. Tourists may want to spend the cash for a single butt, but paying the state, (perhaps?), for a second fish would be insane in my eyes. I would still be happy if the fish pimps were limited to one fish. Maybe they'd learn to fish for salmon too? Sink or swim! Most of our fish pimps are good fishermen that wouldn't have any problem focusing on other fish to supplement the 275.00 fee.
    I don't know what the future holds for private halibut fishing in AK, but I bet it looks a lot like that of Washington state's fishery. I fear that private boaters in little 17 ft. boats will still be associated with taking too many fish. Even though we take a smaller cut than the charters, we'll still be grouped with them.
    I still believe that we need to have reserves off limits to butt fishing. Santuaries for fish to recover and build breeding stock populations. Keeping in mind that not all of the halibut sport caught are from the charters! Either that, or perhaps zones that are only open to sport anglers and other zones for the commercial and charter guys? Anyways, in the long run maybe we should leave some fish for the next generation? Sorry for getting wound up!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    Why should catch and release of halibut be banned?


    because 1 out of every 7 that get released... Die.


    We are concerned about the halibut.. right?

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    I think if I decided to go on a charter for say $250 I'd pay about $100-150 for the second fish. Given I'd already have decided to pay $250 flipping bucks to catch the halibut in the first place right now.... when I might get nothing, I might get one good fish, and one little one, I might get 2 chickens...........you get the idea. I go on a charter about every other year, and think it's mainly not a cost effective way to actaully harvest halibut. Now I'm always hoping for 2 100lb fish. I've never done that, but that's why I pay $250 or whatever. I usually get a great day on the water and my two 20-45lb fish, go home happy, and ready to do it again in a year or two.
    So If I were limited to only one fish, and a second available for purchase IF I decided (based on what I'd be seeing right then and there watching what is being caught) to do so........I'd do a hundred easy. I'd be thinking/hoping/betting my GAF fish would be a big one, and then ok with it not being that big. If not then you are dumb for not realizing if all you've seen all day are 20lb fish then you likely will get a 20lb fish. So it would be worth it to you prior to actually catching the fish...as I have to decide before I resume fishing right? So my thought is most would be happy with the size of the second fish big or small (likely small) as they'd should know that (the expected size of the fish they would eventually catch) even before they agreed to harvest it. Or would it be the wink, wink I'm just fishing for rockfish until I catch a monster halibut type thing? Anyway, it would work.... Just like it does now pretty much, but for $350 total. I'd still pay the normal charter costs for one fish as I'd still be thinking I'd go home with two 100lb fish, or at least one good fish anyway. Given this one fish limit thing would only happen in years with low biomass it would be kind of rare (hopefully), and I doubt costs would suddenly go down if the limit went back to 2 fish per day any size.......it would work out ok for everyone.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    because 1 out of every 7 that get released... Die.


    We are concerned about the halibut.. right?
    Of course I am concerned about halibut, but I am also a sportfisherman, and I like to catch fish too. I don't rape the resource like some, and I don't target large breeding females. I feel I do my part to conserve as much as a user of the resource can, but maybe I don't know myself as well as you do?
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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoose35 View Post
    Of course I am concerned about halibut, but I am also a sportfisherman, and I like to catch fish too. I don't rape the resource like some, and I don't target large breeding females. I feel I do my part to conserve as much as a user of the resource can, but maybe I don't know myself as well as you do?
    Plenty of other fish to catch besides halibut. Waste is a big issue for halibut. We need to start with ourselves first. (sportfishermen) Any charter capt worth his license can severely minimize the amount of halibut being released from his boat, as well as the mortality rate. Changing gear, locations, tactics, etc will all keep more halibut in the ocean and let the stocks rebound.

    If I were king for a day, I'd make it illegal to release all halibut over 32". I'd also ban the use of J hooks for halibut too.



    I think king and halibut catch and release fishing should be banned.

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