Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Tent suggestions!!

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2

    Exclamation Tent suggestions!!

    Hi!
    Planning a trip to Alaska this August.
    Need a new tent and have looked into the Marmot Boreas 3P. Does anyone have any experience with this tent? Can it stand the temperature changes up in Alaska?

    My other option was the Eureka mountain pass 3xte.

    Do you guys have any other suggestions?

    Please get back to me ASAP

    best regards,
    Mike

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I have no experience with that tent, but for the same money you could get a Cabela's Guide model 6 man tent. I have used this tent extensively to include many float hunts. The Guide series tents are one of the most popular tents in Alaska for all but winter camping.









    For inspiration, have a great hunt!!

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I purchased a Hillberg the tentmaker tent a few years back and have been amazed at the performance. http://www.hilleberg.com/home/products/3-person.php I think from what you are looking at, that Nallo 3GT would be what you would want. The most amazing thing about these tents is the weight (that is their lack of weigth). The design is also super strong to stand up to the most extreme Alaska conditions -- wet and wind. The vestebule keeps your sleeping are free of clutter and it always nice to keep your gear out the rain/snow. I have used my tent both on the Kenai and Kodiak and have always stayed dry and comfy.

  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Recommendations on Tents for Alaska

    I would start by reviewing our section on Tents, Awnings & Shelters on this site. All of the general principles you need to know for selecting a tent for Alaska conditions are there.

    Some critical things to consider:

    1. Four-season design. You are coming to Alaska in August, which is, for us, the last gasp of summer. It's typically our warmest month, however you can get snow and winter-like conditions. Your tent needs to hold up to this. The Marmot tent you're looking at is a three-season tent.

    2. Plenty of tiedowns. Your tent needs solid tiedown points along the bottom of the rainfly and at the midpoint of the body.

    3. Adequate ventilation. You need excellent airflow between the tent body and the rainfly, which includes some way for air to enter that space not only along the bottom edges of the fly, but around the door area. This is hard to do with most designs, however some (such as the Terra Nova Quasar series) offer a scoop-type awning over the top of the door area, giving you the chance to ventilate. This is especially crucial if there are two or more people inside the tent.

    I have heard that the Hilleberg design traps a lot of condensation inside. For me, that's a deal breaker because the whole point of a tent is to keep you dry. This is an issue with other brands too (I've seen it with Moss tents in the field). You might research that out a bit. A lot has been written about it here in our forums.

    Lots more to consider, but this is a start.

    Regards,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike_shake View Post
    Hi!
    Planning a trip to Alaska this August.
    Need a new tent and have looked into the Marmot Boreas 3P. Does anyone have any experience with this tent? Can it stand the temperature changes up in Alaska?

    My other option was the Eureka mountain pass 3xte.

    Do you guys have any other suggestions?

    Please get back to me ASAP

    best regards,
    Mike
    Hello Mike,

    Welcome to the forum.

    Please see my comments at this link on here:
    cut and paste if clicking here doesn't work
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...tain-pass-3xte

    PM on here if you need exacting specs and real-world characteristics ASAP

    Cheers!

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    I second the Alaska Guide tents. I guided hunters for years out of a 6 man. Great tents...!!!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,925

    Default

    Ok so you are going to get a lot of suggestions here on tents so I will offer some advice from my many years of living in a tent guiding. First I would read the section that Mike Strahan pointed out. The big one no matter what tent you buy make sure it is Staked down well. Winds here are rediculous if you just stake the bottom chances are in the wind your tent will act like a bobble head till the poles break or better yet (and yes I have seen three so far) the tent will up and roll away. You will want better stakes then the cheapies that come with most tents, with the exception of some tundra most of the ground you will be staking in will be the equivelant of concrete and will eat those cheap stakes. All those cute little tabs on the fly, tie off to every one with para chord and stake them tight.If you cant get stakes in the ground which happens get the biggest rocks logs or whatever to improvise.
    Your breath at night will soak the inside of a tent and leave a nice wet coating on everything, there are windows,leave them open for air circulation. Keep the rain fly from touching the tent,everywhere it touches will be a potential drip.
    The very first thing I do with a new tent is buy seam sealer and coat every seam possible..amazing how those seams can leat out of the factory.
    Always take advantage of weather..when its nice and sunny or dry and in camp.. open the doors(unless really buggy) or windows and dry ot out..
    last but not least nooooo food...not for the bears as I break those rules on a daily basis guiding...its for the little critters like parka squirrels them buggers will make havoc of a tent if you leave food or even just forget to zip.


    quick little search I found this advice on keeping tent dry..not completely geared toward alaska but gives you the idea...

    http://sectionhiker.com/how-to-preve...-condensation/

  8. #8
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Conditions, and your budget - make all the difference

    What tent is right depends on your performance requirements (trip conditions). All that mesh: should do well in mild temps 40's-60s. It'll handle interior moisture well. It's light too - if weight is a priority for you. If there's plenty of cover for you to pitch out of the wind - might be OK. Whoever is getting you to your camp site/s might be the best source of information about both the conditions and other priorities - weight, cost, etc.

    Marmot makes good gear, but the build priorities are different than tough, proven but heavier tents mentioned. The mesh and the hubbed poles on the Marmot -are potential weak points in rainy weather and high winds. The Eureka looks like better weather protection - if the weather turns unfriendly... and lasts awhile.

    One performance requirement I keep up front is cost vs expected use. The Cabela's Guide tents mentioned have been well regarded in these forums - and if you get it with aluminum (not fiberglass) poles, it won't be hard to resell. The link Brian Richardson posted gives good practical advice about Eureka tents which sound terrific too. Altogether on this thread, there's good advice and wisdom of experience.

    Sounds like you're in a hurry? The Tents, Awnings, Shelters link posted by Mike is rich with information - and worth pondering if you're planning a long trip especially. Many a camper here has come back to buy different gear, gear better suited to the conditions they just encountered - including tents. High winds, days of rain, unseasonably warm weather... mosquitos or gnats maybe. Screen tents, mentioned in the article - might be valuable - or maybe a tarp or awning would be better for a second tent? In fact, ask us how many tents we've ended up with - betcha most will use several. We love our tents - because the do their job so well, different jobs on different trips. Good luck!

  9. #9
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    I love my Hilleberg Saivo but it's a bear to be in on a warm summer night. Also using an MSR Hoop 2. Both awesome tents. Great for 2 + gear and built tough.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thank you all for your replies!!!
    After some researching I have decided that we need a strong tent preferably a 4 season tent.
    The only problem with these tents are the weight, usually around 10 lbs. Do you guys think this is to much to have with you on a trekking/rafting trip for 10 days?
    Should I go with a lighter 3 season option?

  11. #11
    Member Gilliland440's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    333

    Default

    I have woke up to 4-5" of snow on my MSR MotherHubba with out fail .... but for rafting I prefer my Hillberg Atlas 8.
    -JR

  12. #12
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I have a MSR Mutha Hubba as well and it is an awesome tent for 2, has an entry and vestibule on each end.



    Lately I have been using a Kifaru Sawtooth with a med stove 12lbs complete with liner. I love the floorless design and the stove just plain rocks. Used this Tipi for several hunts last year from sheep to Kodiak. Lots of room and sets up and comes down in a couple minutes.
    Sheep hunt




    Moose hunt



    Kodiak





    Video of Tipi in high winds.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ps9jdCMo4gg
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    INTERIOR
    Posts
    65

    Default

    i've owned a hilleberg nallo 2 for 4yrs now and no other tent i've ever owned even comes close to what this one can endure. as much as the weather changes up here you'll be thankful to have the protection and peace of mind that a hilleberg provides. expensive yes, but you definitely get what you pay for with this company. i'd give em' a look. good luck.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I would agree with crmcd79. The Hilleberg tents are less than 10 lbs in many of their 4 season models and even though they are so light they can realy stand up to the weather. Although I have owned other of tents, the hIlleberg is my favorite. I would sugest no matter what tent type or brand you buy that you invest in a floor saver that matches your tent footprint. A floor saver will protect the floor of your tent from sharp sticks and rocks that sometimes are missed when pitching a tent. Should your tent have a vestebule or storage area, the floor saver will also keep your gear off of the wet ground and help keep the inside of your sleeping area cleaner. A footprint floor saver is way better than just a tarp on the ground as it will fit perfectly under the tent fly. That way when it rains or snows the shedding moisture will roll off to the outside of your tent. They weigh only ounces. Well worth the added weight.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •