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Thread: 7 Best ("Lucky 7"Most Productive) Lake Flies for Trout

  1. #1

    Default 7 Best ("Lucky 7"Most Productive) Lake Flies for Trout

    OK let's hear what you think are the 7 most productive flies for trout in SouthCentral lakes:
    I like:
    Elk Hair Caddis
    Prrince Nymph
    Scud
    Phesant Tail Nymph
    Misquito emerger
    Marabou Lake Leach
    Griffiths Gnat
    and maybe one more being a gold ribbed hairs ear.

    What are yours?

  2. #2

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    No matter where I am, if I am trout fishing a size 10 black wolley bugger with a big tungsten bead head is number one. From there, various damsel and dragon fly nymph patterns.

  3. #3

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    Come on now guy and gals. I have litteraly handreds of flies and dozens of patterns just for lake fishing alone and am trying to par my vest and boxes down to a managable "load". What's your favorites?

  4. #4

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    You never hear much about it because guys keep kinda quiet, but the Sheep Creek Special is one of the best flies around for trout in lakes, grayling too. It fishes all out of proportion to other flies in general use. Works more often in more places than any other single fly I know of.

  5. #5
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    I've also done well with white wooly buggers (brass bead head) and soft hackles. I need to learn to fish chironomids a little more/better. Oh, and mice
    My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

  6. #6

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    I like to fish parachute adams' in a variety of sizes, especially since I can add a hi-vis post. My other two favorite patterns are patterns that I loved to fish in Colorado: Puterbaugh foam caddis in #12-18, and Pistol Petes in sizes 12-6. I know some people don't think pistol petes are flies, but they sure do catch a lot of fish.

  7. #7

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    I do a lot of fly fishing for trout here in lakes and honestly I catch 90 percent of my fish on some sort of leech pattern! Best flies for lots of fish would be a size 10 black or olive beadhead wooly bugger or a size 10 black or olive lake leech

    If I am going for big fish only a big old olive sting leech or articulated bunny fly with barbell eyes is money

    In terms of non leech patterns i've had good luck on elk hair caddis and scud patterns. But once again Give me some leech patterns on kodiak and i'm set

    Haven't fished mainland southcentral lakes much but when i have I did real well on leech patterns as well

  8. #8
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Positively, the maribou lake leech in size 8 or 6. Olive, black, brown, purple, and white. Even yellow has wk'd on certain days. There were days swinging em on the upper kenai that did great.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  9. #9
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    White and black buggers, CDC emergers, EHC, and copper joes for me. I think I will work on the chironomid patterns this year also.

  10. #10
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Watch the hatch and pick your flies accordingly. I do well working lily beds with an Adams or EHC.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    Watch the hatch and pick your flies accordingly. I do well working lily beds with an Adams or EHC.
    Speaking of fishing around lily pads don't forget to try a small beetle patterrn. There are thousands of these bugs on the lily's and I've done quite well with either a foam backed or deer hair beetles.

  12. #12
    Member cube01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by border collies View Post
    I like to fish parachute adams' in a variety of sizes, especially since I can add a hi-vis post. My other two favorite patterns are patterns that I loved to fish in Colorado: Puterbaugh foam caddis in #12-18, and Pistol Petes in sizes 12-6. I know some people don't think pistol petes are flies, but they sure do catch a lot of fish.
    A word of advice... Don't type pistole petes into a search engine without the search filter turned on. You have been warned.



    I like prince nymphs, buggers, lake leaches, and a few dragonfly nymph variations for under the surface, as well as the EHC, Parachute and regular Adams', and of course, the griffiths nat.
    "If our father had his say, nobody who did not know how to catch a fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him." -A River Runs Through It

  13. #13
    Member Raffpappy's Avatar
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    I start with chironomids early, fished slow on an intermediate sink line or with indicators on a floating line. If these aren't producing due to hatch conditions then I'll go to small PT, prince, and hares ear nymph patterns. As the water warms and the damsel and dragon flies begin coming off, I switch to those patterns because that's when big bows go into overdrive! I learned about and first used Pistol Petes in CO years ago, and continued using them in WA and now here. They are my "go-to" pattern on slow days when nothing else is working. For reasons I can't fully explain, Petes jolt bows into action....char, too! Gotta be the prop. Watching char slice across the surface and slam into Petes mere feet in front of my pontoon boat is a trip! Oh yeah, and when all else fails, I kick around stripping a olive wooly bugger.

  14. #14
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Tie on a black woolly bugger as soon as ice is out, and it stays a go to fly throughout the summer. Early on, go unweighted with a floating line. Shallow water warms up and breaks up first, and the trout are cruising the shallow shorelines. Weighted flies or sinking lines sink too fast and you can't strip them slowly enough. Marabou lake leech and woolly buggers in a variety of colors are my main early season flies. Dragon nymphs and caddis nymphs as the season progresses.

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