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Thread: Backpacking Food

  1. #1

    Default Backpacking Food

    What foods do you take on a backpack hunt? I have been vaccuum packing freeze dried meals, cashews, peanut M&M's, Jerky, Protein Bars, etc. I need some more ideas for some variety without getting heavy. Been trying to follow Tony Russ' suggestion of minimum 100 calories/ounce.

  2. #2

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    I would suggest MREs

  3. #3
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    Have you been doing your own dehydrating? It really adds to the variety & makes things much cheaper. Do a google search for "Freezer bag cooking" & check out their site. Lots of great info & a book that's worth the price.
    I dehydrate my own hamburger & it weighs nothing. Put it in a freezer bag with dehydrated veggies, spices, maybe some powdered milk, & some noodles or pasta. Just add boiling water (equeal volume to the solids) & seal the bag & set it under a jacket or something to keep it warm. Wait 10 minutes or so & you have a meal you can eat straight out of the baggie. No cleanup except for the spoon you lick clean.
    Repackage instant oatmeal the same way. Also for a change dry cereal with the proper amount of powdered milk mixed in. Just add cold water.
    Trail mix, jerky, & a couple of Jolly Ranchers make a great lunch.
    Every meal is in it's own bag. All you need to add is hot or cold water & there's no cleanup.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    What foods do you take on a backpack hunt? I have been vaccuum packing freeze dried meals, cashews, peanut M&M's, Jerky, Protein Bars, etc. I need some more ideas for some variety without getting heavy. Been trying to follow Tony Russ' suggestion of minimum 100 calories/ounce.
    It doesn't matter that much because if you're hungry you'll eat it. Take whatever is on hand, is filling, and needs little or no cooking, as long as it isn't too heavy.

    you can take more by saving weight on mess gear. A canteen cup and a spoon are all you need, for that. I always used to take corn meal and butter. It's good for Mush, and for frying feesch.

    Smitty of the North

  5. #5
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I fry up a bunch of casadillas before I go out and keep em in a ziplock. In the winter when bears aren't a problem I bring a block of cheese and a block of summer sausage and snack on it. Also I bring a bunch of hard candy.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  6. #6
    Sponsor Becky99588's Avatar
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    Default sheep hunt foods

    Blackfoot, you listed the staples that I take too. My extras include hard salami and cheese, they also keep for the long trips. I'm happy with Mtn. House for dinners - better tasting than any other commercial freeze-dried dinners I've tried. It's hard to find 13oz. ones nowadays though, most are 20oz.

    May sound strange, but I always bring up small vacuum sealed bags of carrots and sugarsnaps out of the garden. There is nothing better 3 or 4 days into a long trip, and it's worth the extra few oz. 10-14 days can be hard on the gut without some roughage. Crow berries, cranberries, and blueberries slow me down going up the mountain, but again, worth it.

    Be thankful you get to pack your own food. A friend of mine relied on her husband last year to bring the sheep hunting food, and she got stuck eating pilot bread and butter for 10 days!
    Hunt with your kids, not for your kids

  7. #7

    Default Mountain House

    I buy the #10 cans of Mountain House now and vacuum pack them. You can choose your servings sizes, they are more compact than in the packaging, and you can cook them right in the vacuum bag, not to mention the cost savings. Also, a good item I have found is the new Betty Crocker instant potatoes. You don't have to simmer, just add boiling water and wait a couple of minutes. They come in little packages that say "Microwavable" on them. I'm going to vacuum pack those also so I can cook them right in the bag. Another thing is Bear Creek Chunky Potatoe Soup. You use a lot of fuel because you are suppose to simmer it for a long time, but once or twice on a trip it is worth it.

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