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Thread: Best Broadhead for Caribou and what grain?

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    Default Best Broadhead for Caribou and what grain?

    Iv'e done a little research and it lloks like people are using rage and slick trick broad heads. Do you guys perfer one over the other? Should I shoot 100 grain or 125 grain? I'm using easton axis n fused 340 arrow with 62 lbs at 30" of draw.

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    Ricky I dont have much experience with either broadhead so I will let someone else chime in on that. As far as weight I would try both weights in a field point to see which group better.I would suspect with that long of an arrow the 125's would be a better FOC balance and work better for ya
    Dave

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    I prefer mechanicals on bou because they are typically in windy conditions. My arrows group well with mechanicals vs. fixed vs. field tips, but when you factor in wind, my fixed blade heads seem to be influenced more on shots beyond 20 yards. My favorite all time broadhead for caribou is the NAP Shockwave 125, but I don't believe they make them anymore.

    Caribou are skinny and easy to penetrate if you hit them in the ribs. With your set up, I'd figure out what shoots best for you and go with it. Stay consistent to whatever grain you have been shooting. If you are new to it, then try both weight broadheads and see what fly's best. Once you get dialed in, stick with your set up.

    I use 125 grain with a 29" draw, 64lbs and a 70/90 Gold Tip which is similar spine to the 340's. That set up has knocked down ptarmigan to bison.

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    I use to use Thunderhead 100 grain and like them a lot, I am now using Slick Trick 125 grain only because I want to kill a Grizzly with the bow. I am shooting a Matthews Z7 29in draw @ 67lbs and it worked great last year. Just have to find what your bow likes and go with it.

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    this year i'm planning on trying a new broadhead called the Grave digger by No limit archery. Its a mechanical and fixed broadhead in one, basically a fail proof mechanical. Has a 1" cut on contact main blade and 1 3/4" wide bleeder/mechanical blades. I've been testing it lately and have been impressed, going to try it out on a bear this spring. nolimitarchery.com Something to look into at least. Slick tricks are great broadheads and have a great reputation. I've used rage successfully as well. I guess what really matters is what shoots best for you and having a sharp blade.

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    As others have mentioned try narrowing down to a few brands and then practice out in the field. what ever shoots best from you and your bow is the one to go with. I know broadheads aren't cheap but there can be huge difference from one shooter to another.

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    Thanks for all the info. I will try out a couple diffrent types of broad heads and see which one works the best.

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    I have killed caribou with Wackem Exit broadheads and 125 grain slick trick magnums both are good for caribou, but the slick trick's leave one heck of a hole which I like..

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    Did you know that Gold tip used to be made in the USA? I used to hunt with the owner, and he moved the manufacuring to mexico, I used to love Gold Tip, but I will never shot them again.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerod View Post
    I prefer mechanicals on bou because they are typically in windy conditions. My arrows group well with mechanicals vs. fixed vs. field tips, but when you factor in wind, my fixed blade heads seem to be influenced more on shots beyond 20 yards. My favorite all time broadhead for caribou is the NAP Shockwave 125, but I don't believe they make them anymore.

    Caribou are skinny and easy to penetrate if you hit them in the ribs. With your set up, I'd figure out what shoots best for you and go with it. Stay consistent to whatever grain you have been shooting. If you are new to it, then try both weight broadheads and see what fly's best. Once you get dialed in, stick with your set up.

    I use 125 grain with a 29" draw, 64lbs and a 70/90 Gold Tip which is similar spine to the 340's. That set up has knocked down ptarmigan to bison.

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    I've been looking for someone to hunt grizz the real way, would like to meet up and shot a bit. Outer Springer

    Quote Originally Posted by bowhunternak View Post
    I use to use Thunderhead 100 grain and like them a lot, I am now using Slick Trick 125 grain only because I want to kill a Grizzly with the bow. I am shooting a Matthews Z7 29in draw @ 67lbs and it worked great last year. Just have to find what your bow likes and go with it.

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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    The best broadhead for Caribou hands down is the one that shoots the best from your bow. There are all kinds out there and many preferences between us hunters but find the one that shoots the best. When Fletchers was open in the valley, Scott would let you try out a few broad heads to see what your bow liked and then you could buy that brand. Caribou are not hard to kill. Hitting the sweet spot is the hard part. I got roped into buying some broadheads because they looked cool or were popular. They didn't shoot as good as they looked for my bow. I tried everything but they just won't shoot consistant past 20 yards. Actually they shot consistant, high and to the right at 30 yards every time!

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    I use Axis FMJ 340's with 100gr Nap Hellrazors on my elk,deer, and bear...excellent results for over 6years. I'm going with the same setup for moose next year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    The best broadhead for Caribou hands down is the one that shoots the best from your bow. There are all kinds out there and many preferences between us hunters but find the one that shoots the best. When Fletchers was open in the valley, Scott would let you try out a few broad heads to see what your bow liked and then you could buy that brand. Caribou are not hard to kill. Hitting the sweet spot is the hard part. I got roped into buying some broadheads because they looked cool or were popular. They didn't shoot as good as they looked for my bow. I tried everything but they just won't shoot consistant past 20 yards. Actually they shot consistant, high and to the right at 30 yards every time!
    Guess I've taken about every big game animal in Alaska with a bow. Got turned on to HOward Hill broadheads back in the early days, and believe I'm the first white man to have taken a caribou with a bow [1952]. I've had COMPLETE penetration on every animal I've taken, and each has fallen to the Hill broadhead. I've never even found the broadheads that took an animal. It absolutely will not windplane, and will handle several inches of green bone. I know it's a bit heavy for most of you, but it's the weight of the arrow, not how well it shoots from your partiicular bow, that takes game. In my estimation, that is. It was Howard Hill's appraisal, too, and he'd taken more more big game with his broadheads than any other man, living of dead. It's still my recommendation. My $0.02.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 2 View Post
    Guess I've taken about every big game animal in Alaska with a bow. Got turned on to HOward Hill broadheads back in the early days, and believe I'm the first white man to have taken a caribou with a bow [1952]. I've had COMPLETE penetration on every animal I've taken, and each has fallen to the Hill broadhead. I've never even found the broadheads that took an animal. It absolutely will not windplane, and will handle several inches of green bone. I know it's a bit heavy for most of you, but it's the weight of the arrow, not how well it shoots from your partiicular bow, that takes game. In my estimation, that is. It was Howard Hill's appraisal, too, and he'd taken more more big game with his broadheads than any other man, living of dead. It's still my recommendation. My $0.02.
    My point is that if you can't hit the animal in the first place then the rest doesn't matter. I am sure the Hill broadhead is a great broadhead but some bows are a real pita to tune to a paticular broadhead. Find what shoots good with your bow, be it a Hill or Rage or whatever, I don't think a caribou is gonna be much issue with any of them if it hits it's mark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskabliss View Post
    My point is that if you can't hit the animal in the first place then the rest doesn't matter. I am sure the Hill broadhead is a great broadhead but some bows are a real pita to tune to a paticular broadhead. Find what shoots good with your bow, be it a Hill or Rage or whatever, I don't think a caribou is gonna be much issue with any of them if it hits it's mark.
    Bliss your point is very valid indeed. Sometimes in archery its best not to complicate things.Most bows can be tweaked and twisted to shoot most any broadhead but at what cost of time and how much hair. sometimes the easiest solutions are just as you pointed out simply try a few different broadheads and shoot some groups.I will go one further though. number each arrow and shoot a 5 spot and so as not to ruin arrows and by being numbered you can rule out any fliers

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    Sounds like there is a little more to your story grizzly2, would like to hear some more details about that caribou hunt, that was 60 years ago, I can only imagine the wealth of archery knowledge you possess. Maybe a new thread is in order id you want to share any stories....

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    Thanks Bear, I forgot to mention that. I number all my arrows. It is the best way to know what each arrow is doing without getting them mixed up. Another tool that helps tune arrows is the G5 arrow tool. It squares the shoulders and helps a lot in getting arrows to fly straight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fawkes23 View Post
    Sounds like there is a little more to your story grizzly2, would like to hear some more details about that caribou hunt, that was 60 years ago, I can only imagine the wealth of archery knowledge you possess. Maybe a new thread is in order id you want to share any stories....
    Greetings, fawkes23,

    If you want to start another thread, I'll be there. And, yes, I do have another tale or two. Flew more than 18,000 hours in the bush, and took one of Alaska's Master Guides moose hunting when he was still a school teacher in Kenai, having recentely arrived from Montana.


    Thanks for the note . . . . .

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