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Thread: Irish lords

  1. #1

    Default Irish lords

    I think these fish taste great. A friend of mine cooked some up for me last week. the only problem is that I'm not really sure how to catch them. Can anyone give me a few hints?

  2. #2
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    If you fish for Halibut, eventually they will fine you. Never ate one. In my boat, they go back in and the one who catches it puts 5 dollars in the pot. End of the season. person with the biggest fish of the year gets the pot.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Fun idea, Chico - I like it!

    As for catching them, they tend to inhabit fairly shallow bottoms. I've caught 'em on rocky bottoms and muddy bottoms. Basically, they seem to be an opportunistic feeder. In the Sound I catch plenty of them when jigging in ~50' of water near steep drop-offs, but I think darn near anywhere you can get your hook on bottom you'll have a decent chance of getting into some.

  4. #4
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Default Not exactly Cabezon . . .

    Most of us focus on how NOT to catch 'em!

    Had an uncle who used to come up from San Diego. He saw one of these and asked if it was Cabezon, which is considered a delicacy where he's from. Of course, we had to keep and eat one. I've had it a couple of time - nothing that great. All the worms on the outside and inside kind of gross me out.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    Most of us focus on how NOT to catch 'em!
    LOL! Couldn't agree with that statement more.

    As Brian M. says, just spend a day out plunking for halibut in most Alaskan waters and you'll probably catch at least one or two if not more. Though what you catch might not really be an actual Irish Lord. There are a lot of bottom dwellers that some people call Irish Lords that aren't really Irish Lords. As L.G. says a cabezon looks a lot like one and the uninitiated might think it is. I could write a book on the names my clients have for the various critters we've pulled in over the years.
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    Member Mort's Avatar
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    Gee, you think this is a legitimate question? Is it still April 1?

  7. #7
    Member aufevermike's Avatar
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    No, but it is Friday the 13th

  8. #8
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
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    I always heard the best way to remove them was with either a 1/4 stick of dynamite or a baseball bat.
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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskanmutt View Post
    I always heard the best way to remove them was with either a 1/4 stick of dynamite or a baseball bat.
    Lol...my Dad`s buddy back in the late 70`s out of CI used to slip them over the end of the shotgun and let one go...pretty cool aireal mist! Those guys that pulled their skates with 25 hooks full of those little turkeys really hated `em. The lords are few and far between these days by comparison...and much smaller.


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  10. #10

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    Looks like I should have logged off the work computer...darn coworkers.

    From and old post in 2009:
    An old homesteader from Tutka Bay shared his formula for salsa that goes with Irish Lord. He would first have the Little Woman clean and fillet the fish. In the meantime he would row the skiff across the bay to Homer. Upon arriving, he would unchain his bike and peddle to Proctor's Market. In the produce section he would carefully select a papaya, mango, tomato, onion, calantro, basil, and one lime.
    On the peddle back to the Spit, he would stop at Wallace's Bakery for a loaf of french bread. Reaching the end of the Spit he would stop at the Salty Dog for a salty dog, chain up the bike and row home.
    The vegies and fruit were diced, the spices added along with course sea salt and ground black pepper. The lime was cut and squeezed over the mix and it was set aside.
    The fish was then sauted in a cast iron frying pan. With that all done, the fish was fed to the cats, and the homesteaders ate the salsa and french bread.
    He said the cats ate it just like chicken.

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeaULater View Post
    Looks like I should have logged off the work computer...darn coworkers.

    From and old post in 2009:
    An old homesteader from Tutka Bay shared his formula for salsa that goes with Irish Lord. He would first have the Little Woman clean and fillet the fish. In the meantime he would row the skiff across the bay to Homer. Upon arriving, he would unchain his bike and peddle to Proctor's Market. In the produce section he would carefully select a papaya, mango, tomato, onion, calantro, basil, and one lime.
    On the peddle back to the Spit, he would stop at Wallace's Bakery for a loaf of french bread. Reaching the end of the Spit he would stop at the Salty Dog for a salty dog, chain up the bike and row home.
    The vegies and fruit were diced, the spices added along with course sea salt and ground black pepper. The lime was cut and squeezed over the mix and it was set aside.
    The fish was then sauted in a cast iron frying pan. With that all done, the fish was fed to the cats, and the homesteaders ate the salsa and french bread.
    He said the cats ate it just like chicken.
    Now THAT'S more like it....!!!.....lol

  12. #12
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    SeaULater. There is a couple different kinds of sculpin out there, the biggest being the King Sculpin or Irish Lord, or mother n law fish or whatever you want to call it, big mouth, worms on the out side, kinda smells like garbage. I have never tasted this one.. How ever the green smaller sculpins with the ruff skin, I call them yellow lips. are very tasty, as are the bright red ones I catch well fishing rock piles and kelp beds. if you pick up a smaller red one while Halibut fishing... Just for grins lower in back to the bottom for a bit, some times it will drum up a big halibut..

  13. #13
    Member J2theD's Avatar
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    Lords are one of the ugliest things. I tell you what, I will give you my "Irish Lord Honey Hole." Go down to Whiskey Gulch, and cast a spinner about 20 yds out, real in slow. You will get one every other cast. If you really wanna cheat, get on a boat and jig for them in 10 ft of water. I did this one time while I was waiting for a buddy to bring the boat trailer down. I saw about 50 in 10 minutes just feeding on all of the halibut carcasses...

  14. #14
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Oh man, you made me do it.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Nemo View Post
    There are a couple different kinds of sculpin out there...
    There are a LOT more than a couple out there, at least 30 in Alaskan waters, though most are rarely caught by anglers because they are so darn small.

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Nemo View Post
    the biggest being the King Sculpin or Irish Lord
    The sculpin I assume you are talking about by your description is the Great Sculpin (Myoxocephalus polyacanthocephalus), ​it is the largest sculpin commonly caught up here, and is often called "irish lord", which it is not.
    The largest sculpin is the Cabezon of the west coast, but it's range is about to Sitka.


    Quote Originally Posted by Capt Nemo View Post
    However the green smaller sculpins with the ruff skin, I call them yellow lips. are very tasty, as are the bright red ones I catch
    These would be the "true" Irish lords, either the Red Irish Lord (Hemilepidotus hemilepidotus) the Brown Irish Lord (H. spinosus) or perhaps the Yellow Irish Lord (H. jordani). The color is variable in all 3 species, and they can be best distinguished by the number of scales in the row above the lateral line. All the ones i have seen have been the brown or red, the yellow is more common farther north.

    Pacific Staghorn Sculpin (Leptocottus armatus) are often caught in shallow bays and the tidal portions of KP rivers and are often called "bullhead".

    Okay, I feel better now....
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    Holy ****!!!! there ya go!!! Just got schooled up on sculpins. How ever he just asked how to catch em!! SeaULater!!! I find alot of them out in front of seldovia bay in the sand round 20 fathoms hope that helps...... and WE call em king sculpins and yellow lip's so there!!!!!!!!!!

  16. #16
    Member bnkwnto's Avatar
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    I was fishing once after spending an hour fleshing a black bear hide and I caught a big Irish lord. It puked all kinds of bear hair and parts up. So chumming for them may be the ticket.lol

  17. #17
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    When god was done creating sea creatures he had some spare parts left. A pile of lips and a pile of stomachs. Wala. Irish lords

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    Oh man, you made me do it.....
    I was wondering when you'd chime in, Dave. LOL!
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  19. #19
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    Hay Muttley you mite want to go look in side your boat dude!!!! if that Pretty Penny aluminum thing on M float is yours, it looks like you have had a few bird's living in it all winter!!!! all say no more!! and no I was not looking in a side window!! you can see from the dock walking by.

  20. #20
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TYBSP View Post
    When god was done creating sea creatures he had some spare parts left. A pile of lips and a pile of stomachs. Wala. Irish lords
    Hmmmm. The hot dog of the sea? Wonder what Irish Lord ceviche tastes like; might have to find out.
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