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Thread: Shore fishing in Kenai

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    Default Shore fishing in Kenai

    Hello everyone,
    I'm new to the area and was curious about shore fishing the Cook Inlet in Kenai. Anyone have any recommendations on what kind of line and weights to use or what time of the day to go or where are some good spots? Is fishing the mouth of the Kenai river / Cook Inlet a good spot? Any help would be great guys. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SignalSalute View Post
    Hello everyone,
    I'm new to the area and was curious about shore fishing the Cook Inlet in Kenai. Anyone have any recommendations on what kind of line and weights to use or what time of the day to go or where are some good spots? Is fishing the mouth of the Kenai river / Cook Inlet a good spot? Any help would be great guys. Thanks.
    First, what exactly do you want to fish for and when do you plan on fishing? I wouldn't really consider fishing from the shore in the Kenai area and would suggest you try down around the Whiskey Gulch area (see the recent post not far from yours regarding Shore Fishing on the Kenai Peninsula and Homer) if you really want to try shore fishing.

    But in the Kenai/Soldotna area your best bet would be fishing the Kenai River itself. What gear you would use would depend on what you want to fish for.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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    Member cormit's Avatar
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    Shore fishing in the salt water near the mouth of Kenai and Kasilof Rivers has really gained in popularity in recent years. As herring start to arrive in April, halibut show up as well. On nice days, starting in the early spring, fishermen can be found lined up on the south side of the river entrances casting herring or squid from shore. One day last spring I saw 15 to 20 people casting bait from shore near the Kasilof River mouth with numerous 10 to 40 lb halibut laying on the beach. While large halibut move into shallow water with the herring and then move back out to deeper water as summer progresses ...... some halibut remain available to catch right up to freeze up in the late fall. The bite may be slower than a hot spot out in the Inlet .... but it's a short drive and the cost is pretty much free.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SignalSalute View Post
    Hello everyone,
    I'm new to the area and was curious about shore fishing the Cook Inlet in Kenai. Anyone have any recommendations on what kind of line and weights to use or what time of the day to go or where are some good spots? Is fishing the mouth of the Kenai river / Cook Inlet a good spot? Any help would be great guys. Thanks.
    A kid I worked with went down and fished the mouth of the Kenai a few times. If I remember he caught one nice flounder, and lost a big shark....

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by cormit View Post
    Shore fishing in the salt water near the mouth of Kenai and Kasilof Rivers has really gained in popularity in recent years. As herring start to arrive in April, halibut show up as well. On nice days, starting in the early spring, fishermen can be found lined up on the south side of the river entrances casting herring or squid from shore. One day last spring I saw 15 to 20 people casting bait from shore near the Kasilof River mouth with numerous 10 to 40 lb halibut laying on the beach. While large halibut move into shallow water with the herring and then move back out to deeper water as summer progresses ...... some halibut remain available to catch right up to freeze up in the late fall. The bite may be slower than a hot spot out in the Inlet .... but it's a short drive and the cost is pretty much free.
    Thanks for that info cormit. You learn something new every day!
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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    I've tried several times and only caught sand sharks (fun, slightly dangerous!), skates (hard on my little gear!) and small flounders too little to deal with. Un-impressed I tried the Kasilof gig and didn't catch anything, none of the 10 or so other people were catching either so I gave it up, wen't back to working on the house!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by limon32 View Post
    I've tried several times and only caught sand sharks (fun, slightly dangerous!), skates (hard on my little gear!) and small flounders too little to deal with. Un-impressed I tried the Kasilof gig and didn't catch anything, none of the 10 or so other people were catching either so I gave it up, wen't back to working on the house!
    Having never done it (yet!) I can't talk from experience, but I'd think you'd really want to time it with the return of some sort of baitfish. As cormit said he was there when the herring were running strong. I'd think that things might heat up quite a bit when the hooligan are running strong, too. Might be something worth considering.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I know some guys who catch a few butts off the Kasilof beach during the personal use setnet fishery.
    I am guessing all the fish heads and guts they throw out makes one big chum slick.
    They said they put their bait way out at low tide and cover it with seaweed. once the tide comes in you reel in a little to uncover the bait. This keeps the seagulls off of your bait.
    I much prefer fishing from my boat as the action is better and all that. It might be worth a try though for those without boat access or looking to save some $$$.
    I used to fish off of lands end and caught lots of fish including some Halibut.
    I like a sinker that doesnt roll such as a claw sinker or pyramid. 2oz-6oz depending on current and the rod you are using.
    rig it up on a slider with a swivel and leader. Then a good hook with herring or other bait.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I think you'd probably have better luck going after the starry flounder and whatever other small flounder are in the area. I've taken a few dipnetting and decided to cook one up to see how they tasted. In general I'd say given the fact their skin is incredibly tough and will take the edge right off your fillet knife, and the flesh of one fish will barely make a meal for one they aren't worth the effort. Also they have enzymes that quickly turn the fillets mushy, make sure you fillet them immediately, and preferably cook them as soon as possible. The fish tastes fine, but the consistancy is mushy.

    As to catching them, they have small mouths so I'd suggest a hook no larger than a 2/0 with a small chunk of herring or other bait and a sinker of a few ounces to cast it out.

    I think we often get spoiled given all the excellent eating larger fish we have in our waters and ignore many other species that make for excellent eating. I took a couple flounder in PWS last year and they really are good eating. It never hurts fishing in areas you don't normally consider as holding fish to see what's down there. As much of the tackle we use is geared towards larger fish, we don't often catch these species. I've taken the flounder with jigs and mooching rigs. Not the ideal tackle for shore fishing, hence my recomendation of a small bait hook.

    The other tackle to consider is something like a 1 oz silver or silver blue crocodile spoon, kastmaster or similar. You can catch darn near anything with them, salmon, halibut, rock fish, flounder, et all. Just toss the treble hook they come with and fit a siwash hook.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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