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Thread: Shooting up hill

  1. #1

    Default Shooting up hill

    Can someone please remind me about shooting up hill is it that you shoot lower or higher when shooting up hill. Say the animal is 200yds according to a range finder to you aim where you would on flat ground or high or low?

    Thanks for the help in advance

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    Default Shooting up or Down hill

    Quote Originally Posted by whitetail101 View Post
    Can someone please remind me about shooting up hill is it that you shoot lower or higher when shooting up hill. Say the animal is 200yds according to a range finder to you aim where you would on flat ground or high or low?

    Thanks for the help in advance
    You aim low if you are shooting up or down hill. If it is at steep angles. If it is a slight angle then ignore it.

    Hope this helps

    Barko

  3. #3

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    The simple explanation is that you will have a point of impact that is generally higher than you'd want. This affect is with both up hill and down hill shooting. Your range finder might say that the moose is 227 yards away from you straight down hill but on a horizontal plane it might only actually be 90 yards directly away from you. Since this is not a really long shot the affects will not be as dramatic. But if the shot is 375 yards uphill or down hill but really only 180 yards directly away from you on a horizontal plane and you try to compensate for the long shot (375 yards) by aiming high, you will hit very high.(ie "holdover" aiming at the top of his back or just over it which you might do on flat ground shot if you know your ballistics for a 375 yard shot) . Its kind of hard to explain without a diagram. Hope you understand what I am saying and I havent confused you, you'll hit high uphill and down hill.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    triganometry is your friend

    Aim low
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    the above is correct. the steeper the uphill or downhill the more dramatic the effect. angle cosine is the correct term for the effect. there are ballistic calculators that can solve the problem for range work. mildot master being one.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Or you could buy a new leupold RX III or RX IV that calculates the angle and distance for you. I haven't had the opportunity to really try mine out yet. Ok....... its really the wifes

  7. #7

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    Thanks for all the help i thought that you had to aim low. I have the leupold RX2 rangefinder but it is the model that doesn't offer that.
    Thanks again

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    Lightbulb reliance upon technology

    yes, the leupold scope could be another way to go. however, i feel that new technology is not a substitute for shooting skill.

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    Default gravity

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaCub View Post
    The simple explanation is that you will have a point of impact that is generally higher than you'd want. This affect is with both up hill and down hill shooting. Your range finder might say that the moose is 227 yards away from you straight down hill but on a horizontal plane it might only actually be 90 yards directly away from you. Since this is not a really long shot the affects will not be as dramatic. But if the shot is 375 yards uphill or down hill but really only 180 yards directly away from you on a horizontal plane and you try to compensate for the long shot (375 yards) by aiming high, you will hit very high.(ie "holdover" aiming at the top of his back or just over it which you might do on flat ground shot if you know your ballistics for a 375 yard shot) . Its kind of hard to explain without a diagram. Hope you understand what I am saying and I havent confused you, you'll hit high uphill and down hill.
    Like stated above....gravity is only aplicable in verticle square measurements....so on a steep angle you pass through less squares than traveling horizontally. Measure a box across then measure it diagonally through the middle.

    Imagine a helium ballon tied to the moose mentioned above at 227 yds downhill.....now imagine how close the ballon would be if it were flying at eye level to you. Hope this helps

    jedi

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cold zero View Post
    yes, the leupold scope could be another way to go. however, i feel that new technology is not a substitute for shooting skill.
    I would have to agree with you but, on the flipside it can help you learn and practice so you have a better understanding/idea what to do when in the real situation.

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    Default aim low for uphill/downhill shots

    if you can learn to make angle shots without the use of technolog, or any shooting aids for that matter. then you will be better prepared. batteries go dead, scopes fog/fail, laminated index cards are k.i.s.s. simple.

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    The balloon answer is the best for those with limted math skills anyway take the distance up the hill (as measured by your range finder) and multiply it times the cosine of the angle you are shooting (as measured by the inclimeter that you always carry ) that is the distance you want to use for your balistics shooting distance.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Granted that none of us carry an inclimeter, ONLY HORIZONTAL distance counts! Gravity doesnt care if you shooting uphill or downhill.

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    Shot my sheep this year at 224 yds at ( I think) around a 37-38 degree inclination, according to my calculated little piece of paper I aimed 6 inches low.. Did the trick . right on the money, and it us the same with downhill as well.

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    Say, you are on the ground, and you are shooting at a squirrel uphill, in a tree. The range is from you to the tree, not from you to the squirrel.

    If you amplified that and the squirrel is Uphill, or Downhill, 300 yards away, the actual range would be less, and if you have to estimate the range, it's less than 300 yards.

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    Now this is true and is called the riflemans method. It is good for several hundred yards. Of course for precision shooting at extreme distances things like balistic coeficient come into effect since the bullet is still traveling the straight line distance and is in the air for a longer pierod of time. This method simulates a bullet traveling in a vacuum and takes into account only gravity. Since this is the hunting forum though I think this is the best method. If you are at a range far enough that the other factors make a significant impact you should continue stalking until you are closer.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifleman's_rule

  17. #17

    Default uphill downhill

    Get yourself a Sunnto pocket clinometer. It has a cosine table printed on the back. Take your angle in degrees (not percent), find the cosine and multiply that by the yardage to arrive at your true horizontal distance. For example;
    36 degrees (cosine .809) X 275 yards = 222 yards.

    I'm no mathematician, but that's how I was told to do it. I do notice though that the table on the back of the clinometer only goes up to 45 degrees.

    One way to illustrate the the concept is to imagine that you are shooting at an angle that is 90 degrees up or down, in that case it doesn't matter how far the distance is as there wont be any drop, as long as your bullet will make it to the target you just have to aim dead-on.
    Mark

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    sound advice from wags, that will work. angle shots are less affected by gravity, than a horizontal shot.

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Now this is true and is called the riflemans method. It is good for several hundred yards. Of course for precision shooting at extreme distances things like balistic coeficient come into effect since the bullet is still traveling the straight line distance and is in the air for a longer pierod of time. This method simulates a bullet traveling in a vacuum and takes into account only gravity. Since this is the hunting forum though I think this is the best method. If you are at a range far enough that the other factors make a significant impact you should continue stalking until you are closer.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifleman's_rule
    Also very true
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Default Jedi-

    Imagine a helium ballon tied to the moose mentioned above at 227 yds downhill.....now imagine how close the ballon would be if it were flying at eye level to you. Hope this helps
    Finding swamp donkeys is hard enough sometimes, now you want me to tie a dang balloon on him?

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