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Thread: Spotting scopes - Angled or Straight?

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    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    Default Spotting scopes - Angled or Straight?

    Just a question out of curiosity. What type of spotter do you prefer and why? An angled spotter or straight.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Personally I would go straight. I don't really like to have to wipe the eyepiece a lot when its raining. An angled one will catch more rain...

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    Angled, in a landslide. There's a reason God made lens covers and hat bills.

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    I have both and much prefer angled, seems like a personal preference, but I find angled much easier on my neck. As far as brand, buy the best you can afford and price does make a difference, after 8 years I finally bought a Swaro ATM 65 and was amazed that I could see those tiny bullet holes in a target at 300 yards. I did have a Pentax that gave me great service and was the best cheaper glass that I ever looked through.

    You can check out mine when you stop by for your Havlon Blades.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Wasn't there a very exhaustive thread on this exact subject within just the last couple years?.... Maybe I'm just suffering deja vu.
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    to me no question.....straight.. laying a scope up on a ridge looking at sheep trying not to be seen,couldnt imagine having to hold my head up higher to look through eye piece..with straight I can lay flat on the ground and kep low profile. Also looking down top of tube to find target prior to looking through lens seems easier with straight...just me of course..

    iofthetaiga no offense but I am sure most subjects have been discussed here before but new people sign on all the time and maybe rehashing old discussed threads will help them out and save them the trouble of long searches...

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    Angled for me at this point, previous one was straight. As for laying down, peaking over a ridge, my scope (as do most angled ) turns sideways so you can keep the low profile.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Angled for me at this point, previous one was straight. As for laying down, peaking over a ridge, my scope (as do most angled ) turns sideways so you can keep the low profile.

    I know I know knew that was coming Snyd..lol I tried an angled spotter before just seemed a little awkard to me laying on the side of the mountain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    I know I know knew that was coming Snyd..lol I tried an angled spotter before just seemed a little awkard to me laying on the side of the mountain.
    Ya, it's sort of a work around but it works. A straight one is easier in those situations.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    I was just curious how all of you felt about them, pros and cons. My last one was straight but the wife bought me a new Luepy for x-mas and it is angled. I haven't had a chance to use it yet. Glassing while prone was really my biggest concern but like Snyd said, you can rotate it to the side. It might work out well shooting at the bench too.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    Angled, in a landslide. There's a reason God made lens covers and hat bills.
    Oh it's a landslide now is it? Says you.....

    Fact is, in the heat of it you don't always remember to cover the lens....

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    What I like about the angled is you have a much greater number of viewing positions. On a tripod you can rotate the body to move the eyepiece to what ever position you want - left, right, straight down, even looking up into the eyepiece if you are on your belly. With a straight setup, you have one position - in line with the body of the scope. To me, looking slightly down into the eyepiece is much more natural than craning my neck up to look through a straight tube.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Oh it's a landslide now is it? Says you.....

    Fact is, in the heat of it you don't always remember to cover the lens....
    Then loosen the mounting collar and twist the scope to where the eyepiece is flat. Same solution for the proverbial poke-your-head-over-the-ridge situation.

    If 75% of your glassing is done in conditions which permit sitting down with no precipitation and using a tripod, an angled scope allows VASTLY superior ergonomics while glassing, the rotating collar allows you to handle the other 25% of scenarios where straight scopes are percieved to have some advantage, and you don't need as tall a tripod so you save weight.

    Win win win win.

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    Straight seem to fit better in a scope slot in your pack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Angled for me at this point, previous one was straight. As for laying down, peaking over a ridge, my scope (as do most angled ) turns sideways so you can keep the low profile.
    Works Great

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    Then loosen the mounting collar and twist the scope to where the eyepiece is flat. Same solution for the proverbial poke-your-head-over-the-ridge situation.

    If 75% of your glassing is done in conditions which permit sitting down with no precipitation and using a tripod, an angled scope allows VASTLY superior ergonomics while glassing, the rotating collar allows you to handle the other 25% of scenarios where straight scopes are percieved to have some advantage, and you don't need as tall a tripod so you save weight.

    Win win win win.
    Personal preference....I just don't care for them, and I know a few other guides that don't as well......

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Personal preference....I just don't care for them, and I know a few other guides that don't as well......
    exactly..

    They make two different styles of scopes for one reason..there is a demand for both. For every reason there is to use an angled there is an oposing reason to use a straight scope. I base my reasons for the simple fact that a straight is more comfortable for me. I have got more hours on a scope then most on this forum and I have tried both and stick with straight. Does not mean that its the best just its the best for me. For others angled suits them better and they have there reasons. The best advice is to if possible try both in hunting like situations and see what is more comfortable and pick that one because if it is not comfortable then you will be less likely to use it and in the end that will be the worse choice...

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    My first two spotting scopes that I used over about ten years were straight, then for last season I got an angled and I prefer the angled. For me it is a lot more comfortable on the neck and shoulders to use. With a straight you have to get right behind it all the time, so if youre sitting in the rocks looking for sheep and your ass and your tripod are finally in a stable comfortable spot, you dont have to move something everytime you want to look at a different area. You can rotate the scope so you can still see into the eyepiece without moving your ass or tripod. Its a little easier to locate animals with the straight but with practice it gets easy with an angled as well.

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    I can see the benefit of both in different situations. I like mine straight for what it's worth.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    The ergo element is almost negated with a nice tripod really. Yes, there are a few stalk like situations where just a scope is employed and keeping every centimeter undercover is important. Most of the time though, you can sit back and make all desired adjustments via your tripod and get good ergonomics from a strait. So I'd say going ultralight with a mini tripod angled gets the nod, full sized and featured tripod, strait gets it. No tripod, definatly the angled. I've used both over the years in different situations. I enjoy a quality spotter tremendously while hunting.

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