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Thread: 4" Redhawk in .45 Colt review, 100 rounds in and loving it.

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    Default 4" Redhawk in .45 Colt review, 100 rounds in and loving it.

    Long story shorter, I have a 4" SW in .500 magnum, and 642-x snubbie in .38 Special. I am competent with both, but neither are fun to shoot. Been looking for a fun to shoot gun for a couple years. I have an idea I can run up to Pro-Tec out the Steese up Chatanika way and do some steel target shooting over the summer, be a better shooter because of the practice.

    Been pretty sure for a while I want a 4" barrel, something powerful enough for a hunting sidearm anywhere in the lower 48. Don't want a .44 magnum, I already got a 50. Spent a lot of time looking at SW 625s, the mountain gun. And 629s anyway, and the 624 (.44 Special) Wowee, those things aren't cheap even used. Makes me wonder what the S-Ws I already own are really worth. The only .45Colt Smith and Wesson has in production right now is the model 25 classic with 6" barrel.

    Right when I was looking at Rugers even though I have been an S-W man my whole life, tvfinak had his redhawk trouble over in this thread - http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...-45-Colt-today

    Good Lord. I read that thing through twice and it put me off Ruger for a solid month.

    But I bought one anyway last week. I want .45 Colt dang it, big case capacity, easy shooting. And I want it light enough to handle a lot quicker than my X frame, but still powerful enough to deal with interior Alaska bear during moose season. Looking for that balance point, light enough to pack, powerful enough to count on.

    It was the Ruger only tables in the Hodgdon reloading data center that finally did me in. I had looked, twice, at loading .44 magnum COAL to .44 Special velocity and using that to shoot steel target, but only two dudes on the whole internet have ever done it and posted about it, and I don't want to spend anymore time behind a chronograph than I have to. .45 Colts loads are more plentiful than Small Block Chevy parts, they are both everywhere.

    I haven't reloaded for my new gun yet, want to make sure all the kinks are out before I void the warranty.

    I got two empty boxes of Remington 255 grain now, $52.99 for a box of 50 cartridges at Fred Meyer's this week. oof, that $106 went by fast.

    Short version, 100 rounds and about 1000 dry fires in, the trigger is better. A lot better. Not ready for prime time, but still improving. The first six rounds, I had to fire single action - and rotate the cylinder with my other hand while cocking the hammer with my first hand, that tight. There are still two spots in the cylinder that sticky, but the other four are working fine already.

    Folks that have had Rugers for years and 10s of thousands of rounds I think have nicer triggers than any of my Smith and Wessons ever did. I didn't realize it was going to take quite this much break-in to get double action all the way around the cylinder, but it is still improving.

    Empty, it dryfires all the way around double action no problem. Loaded, the same two holes bind no matter where I start the rotation. I think it is the star shaped thing in the middle of the breech face of the cylinder. There was a man at the Cushman Street range today with a Super Redhawk - he said it had about 5000 rounds through it. The star shaped bit that the pawl pushes against to rotate the cylinder looked way cleaner on his than mine does. I hope I don't wear out my pawl in polishing up the bit the pawl pushes against, but a replacement can't be that expensive.

    I think what I am going to do is make up some dummy cartridges, no primer, no powder, just brass and bullet - and use those for dryfiring. I suspect that if I load those up and point the muzzle at the ceiling the pawl will have to roate the loaded cylinder, but not lift loaded cartridges against gravity while empty cases are coming down the opposite side. Worth a try anyway. Hopefully that will be enough weight to polish it faster, but not so much weight that it locks the gun up.

    So moving on, everything else is good news.

    Last sale price on this gun at budsgunshop was $756 and do I want to wish list it? I decided against, because I would apparently be hosed if the front site was out of alignment. 756 +30 transfer + 50 shipping to Alaska = $836 internet price, luck of the draw. Going rate on gunsamerica and gunbroker is $750 NIB . I have seen a couple used ones go by at ~$550, but they both made me nervous and I didn't get super prompt responses when I asked the seller the question "Is the front sight on this gun in good alignment?"

    I found Alaska Guns and Ammo (no affiliation) on Sixth Street in Fairbanks had two of them in stock at $849. Both of them had their front sight on straight. I would say I picked the one with the prettier wood grips, but you know better, it is a rubber grip. They looked identical to me, I bought the one with an easier to remember serial number.

    The HKS 25-5 speedloader (labeled for Smith and Wesson model 25) really does work fine with Redhawk. There will be a picture at the bottom.

    The blackhawk leather scabbard holster (same people that make the serpa) for 4" N frame fits the 4" Redhawk just fine. In fact, the packaging says Smith and Wesson, but the back of the leather is stamped '4"N frame, 4" redhawk'. Pics attached. I should mention my version is measures 3 15/16" from the cylinder face to the muzzle. I don't know if the 4.2 redhawk would fit this blackhawk size 3 holster, but it maybe might squeeze in there. I like that the Galco DAO covers the rear sight, but I like the thumbreak on the Blackhawk holster. I don't carry crossdraw anymore, but the DAO should still get props for being capable. Galco also makes an OWB for the redhawk that carries at 5 o'clock, but my rotator cuffs are too far gone to think real hard about that. I probably will order a pancake holster from Simply Rigged, i haven't read a negative review on those yet.

    The best news of all is this thing is a dream to carry. At the risk of losing my man card, the first time I left the house with this gun - stuck in my waist band like a banana republic colonel no less - I broke into song before I got to the driveway. It is a good packing weight. Much lighter and smaller than my Xframe, but still powerful enough.

    I got two eight inch groups at 25 yards today, 8" circle from a pistol rest and 4" horizontal by 12" vertical freehand, both were fired single action to accomodate my gimpy spots. I am thankfully on the list for the reamer.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Stripping the gun for deep cleaning is covered in the manual, the I find the relevant text has been edited in a suboptimal way. Secodn time through, i still need the book to do it. I was going to wait until I had several hundred more rounds through it, but I wanted to see the wear pattern on the pawl, difficult assembled.Nframeandredhawk.jpgstripped.jpg

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    Default Congradulations!

    Good to hear you found a couple of Redhawks with straight barrels! Perhaps they shipped all the crooked one to Anchorage?

    But the price- OUCH! Mine was $672 on sale; the normal price at Mt. View Sports is only $775. I'll be watch to see if any come into Anchorage at a decent price; if so I'll pick up another. But at close to $900 I'll get a Mt. Gun in .45 Colt as Linebaugh states they will withstamp loads that are plenty heavy. But I've also got a .500 and a .460 and a number of .44s so I probably don't really need a Redhawk except I want to do the .454 conversion.

    In any event I'm glad my posting of my experience alerted you the issue of crooked barrels and you held out and got a good one. I had the same none response from several sellers on GunBroker - like you I suspect the na
    brrels were crooked in theirs also. I wasn't trying to scare anyone away from buying one - just share my education.

    The trigger pull on mine in single action was terrible at first but then got much better. One negative of the Ruger transfer bar design is that you are moving the bar as you are pulling the trigger all the way thru; on the S&W the hammer block drops out of the way at the very start and you are only releasing the hammer at the end. Minor point but I think it helps the out-of-the-box Smiths.

    You need to do the cylinder throat reaming if you are going to shoot cast bullets. My accuracy was also terrible with cast bullets. I did pick up a couple of .44 Mag Redhawk cylinders; I'm going to bore them out to .45 Colt cut with the tighter .460 dimensions when I get another gun.

    Enjoy and let us know how it all works out.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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    Enjoy your fine Ruger it will last a lifetime even with loads that make other guns cringe
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Default ought to ...

    For the cost, size, and weight it ought do something right!

    I can shoot loads in my .45 Colt loads in my S&W .460 that will make the Ruger come apart - what is your point - another S&W bashing?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Enjoy your fine Ruger it will last a lifetime even with loads that make other guns cringe
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    For the cost, size, and weight it ought do something right!

    I can shoot loads in my .45 Colt loads in my S&W .460 that will make the Ruger come apart - what is your point - another S&W bashing?
    Just can't resist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swmn View Post







    ............................................. I probably will order a pancake holster from Simply Rigged, i haven't read a negative review on those yet............................................... .........
    I've got a used Simply Rugged pancake I'd sell. It has the removable top flap also.
    "The older I get, the better I was."

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    Actually I looked at the 460 as an option to carry .45Colt and .454 Casull, not interested in shooting 460 since I already have a .500.

    Current production X frame 460s come in 8, 10 and IIRC 14" barrels. And they are X frame heavy. There used to be a 5" 460, back in 2008 or so, I think.

    Couldn't find any used 4-6" 460s on the auction sites, and even if I had found one it would be X frame size and X frame heavy.

    Among 4" barreled N frame sized guns, I got the one I wanted.

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    Default I want one...

    A simple "I want one" is plenty of justification for getting a Redhawk of anything else!

    To myself I have to justify the cost compared to other things I want - I can't really say I "need" anything.

    I do want a Redhawk .45 to make a .454 but I'm don't want one bad enough to payi major money for one - the one I got was a good deal, it just wasn't right even after Ruger worked on it twice so I'll keep trying to find one right from the start.

    For carrying a Mdl 25-5 should be better than a Mdl 29 - a bit lighter and somewhat more powerfull. Linebaugh has some pretty stout loads worked up for them. However, like the .45 Redhawk I haven't found a short barreled 25-5 or 625-5 yet at the right price. I did pick up a very 25-5 but it is an 8 3/8" and as an early gun it has the sloppy chambers so I've have to have S&W fit a new cylinder to it if I want to shoot it with cast bullets. But at $450 like new in the wooden case it was a deal I couldn't pass up.


    Quote Originally Posted by swmn View Post
    Actually I looked at the 460 as an option to carry .45Colt and .454 Casull, not interested in shooting 460 since I already have a .500.

    Current production X frame 460s come in 8, 10 and IIRC 14" barrels. And they are X frame heavy. There used to be a 5" 460, back in 2008 or so, I think.

    Couldn't find any used 4-6" 460s on the auction sites, and even if I had found one it would be X frame size and X frame heavy.

    Among 4" barreled N frame sized guns, I got the one I wanted.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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    So quickie update, last night I did make some weighted dummies out of the empty brass I am accumulating. Just clean sized brass and a 250gr cast bullet, no powder, no primer.

    I was thinking I could dry fire those a bunch to finish polishing the pawl / star shaped thingy I don't know the correct name of interface. Built them, loaded them, darn gun rotates those double action round and round and round no problem. Does just fine in single action with those too, so it isn't a weight issue.

    I got Ruger on the phone this morning, they said maybe my case heads are sticking to the back face of the frame behind the cylinder. So I snuck out to the range a little bit since I had a whole in my work schedule. The good news is one of my two remaining sticky cylinders fired double action without a hiccup, once out of three tries.

    However, when the trigger locks with the hammer about halfway back on either of my two sticky spots, (the gun has a snoot full of loaded ammunition at this point) I find the cylinder turns freely. The latch in the bottom of the frame right above the trigger guard is clear, and my case heads are clearly not binding. Center pin must be square, fool thign turns easily.

    It has got to be something in the star/ pawl interface that doesn't happen when the gun is dry fired. I think next I'll clean all the oil off of it, sprinkle some graphite powder in the interface, dry fire it a few hundred times and look at the working surfaces of the star.

    EDIT: ratchet. I think one of the correct names for that star shaped piece is the ratchet.

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    Default couple of possibilites..

    Not sure what you meant by "not a weight issue"? My thought would be that the added interia of the rounds caused the cylinder to rotate on through the place where it is binding. Does it operate freely even if you operate the action very slowly?

    Second though would be that the loaded rounds are affecting the position of the extractor/ rachett assembly. The extractor assemblies on Redhawks I've examines appear to be more loosely fitted than S&Ws. On Rugers they look like they were added to a finished cylinder while on S&Ws the extractor assembly appears to be machined as part of the cylinder. In any event the Ruger extractors are rather loosley fitted so the dummy rounds may be forcing it into correct alignment.

    And- if worse comes to worse don't be afraid to send it back to Ruger. They are a great bunch of folks and will do there best to make it right or even refund you money if they can't fix it. They pick the gun up at your door and drop it off at no cost.


    Quote Originally Posted by swmn View Post
    So quickie update, last night I did make some weighted dummies out of the empty brass I am accumulating. Just clean sized brass and a 250gr cast bullet, no powder, no primer.

    I was thinking I could dry fire those a bunch to finish polishing the pawl / star shaped thingy I don't know the correct name of interface. Built them, loaded them, darn gun rotates those double action round and round and round no problem. Does just fine in single action with those too, so it isn't a weight issue.

    I got Ruger on the phone this morning, they said maybe my case heads are sticking to the back face of the frame behind the cylinder. So I snuck out to the range a little bit since I had a whole in my work schedule. The good news is one of my two remaining sticky cylinders fired double action without a hiccup, once out of three tries.

    However, when the trigger locks with the hammer about halfway back on either of my two sticky spots, (the gun has a snoot full of loaded ammunition at this point) I find the cylinder turns freely. The latch in the bottom of the frame right above the trigger guard is clear, and my case heads are clearly not binding. Center pin must be square, fool thign turns easily.

    It has got to be something in the star/ pawl interface that doesn't happen when the gun is dry fired. I think next I'll clean all the oil off of it, sprinkle some graphite powder in the interface, dry fire it a few hundred times and look at the working surfaces of the star.

    EDIT: ratchet. I think one of the correct names for that star shaped piece is the ratchet.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Which type of extractor does your Redhawk cylinder have?

    45 Colt cylinder from the first year 45 Colt 4" Redhawk with the extractor pins



    454 Cylinder from 2011 Super Redhawk 454. I have also heard that the 480 guns they've done over the past year or so have this new style extractor without the pins. I had no problems with either one in my gun.


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    My Redhawk made last year had the later pinless type extractor so they must have switched sometime in the past. It would be interesting to know when the change was made to help date a used gun one may want to buy. S&W tracked their revisions on the model number - I wish Ruger did the same.


    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Which type of extractor does your Redhawk cylinder have?

    45 Colt cylinder from the first year 45 Colt 4" Redhawk with the extractor pins



    454 Cylinder from 2011 Super Redhawk 454. I have also heard that the 480 guns they've done over the past year or so have this new style extractor without the pins. I had no problems with either one in my gun.

    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    Not sure what you meant by "not a weight issue"? My thought would be that the added interia of the rounds caused the cylinder to rotate on through the place where it is binding. Does it operate freely even if you operate the action very slowly?
    I should have been more specific. I meant "polar moment of inertia" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_of_inertia ) but my posts tend to be fairly lengthy when I warm up to a subject.

    Last night I tried stacking the deck against the action by loading three of my dummy cartridges on the sticky side and leaving the other three empty. My two sticky chambers are seperated by one that works fine, and then the other three side by side are working fine in DA. In that instance the three chambers that work fine in DA anyway would be lifting empty chambers, while the sticky side would be lifting dummy weighted chambers as empty chambers rolled down the off side of the cylinder. Didn't make a darn bit of difference, the gun dryfires just fine in DA no matter what.

    I did get a picture of the extractor. My extractor looks just lik Snyd's .45 cylinder - except mine has two locator pins and two stamped S's. And my ratchet looks pretty rough compared to the ones on other Rugers that are working good.

    I'll try to edit pics and get them up tonight, at this point I think there is hope to just keep firing it with the reasonable expectation it will be fine once it is broken in. I am a little concerned that breaking it in with lightweight .45 Colt loads might leave me starting over when I move up to Corbon type bear defense loads.

    So edit and post pics, I am going to run to 250 live rounds before I call Ruger again, and I am going to get a feeler gauge set. I am curious to measure the barrel/ cylinder face gap at rest, in lockup after dryfire and in lockup after live fire.

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    Default Operating slowly

    I wasn't refering as much to the weight - balanced or unbalanced -but rather to the moment of inertia. Trick is- does the gun operate when you work the action v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y so that the spinning motion does not carry it through a spot that would otherwise hang up? Also - try it with 6 empty cases- they will have much less inertia than loaded rounds.

    Interesting that you gun would have the old style extractor is it is a new gun. Mine had the new style extractor and it was made last year. The Serial number on mine was 0503-630XX - yours should be higher. Also - what is the date on the envelope containing the fired case? That is a good indication of when it was made.

    I looked at the two Redhawk .44 Mag cylinders I have for eventual rework into tighter chambered .45 LC cylinders. Both are older models with the pins but are not fitted as nearly as tight as S&Ws- I can see where the extractor/rachet assembly could be shifted with cases or rounds in place.

    Check the cylinder gap on both sides - not just one side. Mine was uneven from side to side- the barrel wasn't cut off square on the breech end! From what I can find the factory spec is .004 -.010" but I was never able to verify those clearances.


    Quote Originally Posted by swmn View Post
    I should have been more specific. I meant "polar moment of inertia" ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_of_inertia ) but my posts tend to be fairly lengthy when I warm up to a subject.

    Last night I tried stacking the deck against the action by loading three of my dummy cartridges on the sticky side and leaving the other three empty. My two sticky chambers are seperated by one that works fine, and then the other three side by side are working fine in DA. In that instance the three chambers that work fine in DA anyway would be lifting empty chambers, while the sticky side would be lifting dummy weighted chambers as empty chambers rolled down the off side of the cylinder. Didn't make a darn bit of difference, the gun dryfires just fine in DA no matter what.

    I did get a picture of the extractor. My extractor looks just lik Snyd's .45 cylinder - except mine has two locator pins and two stamped S's. And my ratchet looks pretty rough compared to the ones on other Rugers that are working good.

    I'll try to edit pics and get them up tonight, at this point I think there is hope to just keep firing it with the reasonable expectation it will be fine once it is broken in. I am a little concerned that breaking it in with lightweight .45 Colt loads might leave me starting over when I move up to Corbon type bear defense loads.

    So edit and post pics, I am going to run to 250 live rounds before I call Ruger again, and I am going to get a feeler gauge set. I am curious to measure the barrel/ cylinder face gap at rest, in lockup after dryfire and in lockup after live fire.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    Trick is- does the gun operate when you work the action v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y so that the spinning motion does not carry it through a spot that would otherwise hang up? Also - try it with 6 empty cases- they will have much less inertia than loaded rounds.
    With any combination of empty chambers or dummy rounds the gun works great in both SA and DA. At any speed, fast, slow, faster, slower. And with live rounds, it functions all the way around single action.

    I feel pretty good about the trigger return too, there is a blurb in the manual about making sure to let the trigger come all the way forward before pulling the trigger again - cause the gun will lock up if the shooter doesn't do that. That is true, I can force the gun to lock by not letting the trigger return quite all the way on any of the six chambers.

    With live rounds, DA, it locks up on 2 of the chambers and runs fine on the other four.

    But it is getting better. Yesterday one of my two sticky chambers actually did fire DA when I was expecting it to stick-- not a habit I want to reinforce.

    I'll check the date on the envelope tonight.

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    Ok, it is going back to Ruger. Drat. I am up to 200 live rounds and 2,000 dryfires. Functions flawlessly dry firing, has never yet let a string of 6 go double action. Always with the sticking and stopping. Tonight at the range I realized I was not expecting the gun to fire as I pulled the trigger, I was expecting it to lock up. Not good. So I am sending it out and firing lots of working double action in my other revolvers to get my muscle memory back before I develop any really bad habits.

    I have been reading up as I go, and I am not a gunsmith. I _think_ the problem is the pawl/ ratchet interface. I can buy a new pawl from Midway for about eight dollars and install it myself, but for a professional job I would have to work over the working faces of the ratchet with a file, I think equalized or normalized is the gunsmithing term. Might be that working over the existing ratchet will solve the problem.

    If I send it to Ruger, it will be a free repair and my gun will still be in warranty. If I take it to a local smith it won't be free and it goes downhill from there.

    Otherwise I still love this lug of a tool. There is something about lighting off a 135 year old cartridge that just can't be matched by the latest greatest gee-whiz magnum. It just makes me feel American I guess. Cool stuff. I especially like it when a wee puff of smoke trots out the muzzle behind a bullet.

    The Redhawk carries like a dream too. I have been taking it everywhere I legally can all week. The scabbard style holster I have works pretty good under a longish hunting overshirt, I shift the holster a little forward for walking, and a little back for driving; but neither is a big deal because the gun isn't "that" heavy.

    The 4" Redhawk feels a little bit bigger and a little bit heavier than my J frame 38Special snubbie. The Redhawk also feels an enormous amount smaller and lighter than my Xframe or BFR. OTOH it is a .45LC that qualifies for the Ruger only reloads table, no question I have a new everyday carry gun for the days I choose to carry.

    Looking forward to trying the Simply Rugged pancake holster I ordered. It probably won't slide around as far on my belt, but it might also carry the revolver high enough that I don't need to slide it around.

    I did find a local source for 230 grain .452 bullets. Bill F out at Pro-Tec (Chatanika) wants steel target shooters to run cast lead around 750fps, but the floor energy factor for big revolver is only 165. 230grains * 750 fps = 172,500, divided by 1000 = 172.5 energy factor. 250grains * 750fps = 187.5 power factor, aparently enough to shoot through the steel plates he has at the range out there.

    How cool is that? If I were to run a 135 year old bullet at 3/4 of the speed it ran in 1873, it will shoot clean through a steel plate designed to absorb thousands and thousands and thousands of hits from .45ACP. Or dent it or otherwise handle it roughly. For whatever reason, 250 grains of cast lead at 750fps is too much power for those steel plates. And, on the Redhawk platform at least, it is a low pressure, easy shooting kitty cat. For the operator.

    I slugged my barrel and came up with .451 groove diameter. I couldn't get that .451 slug through any of my chamber throats without a hammer. I traded a couple emails with the guy at cylindersmith, he is still accepting cylinders for throat reaming at his shop on the east coast. I suspect it would be bad form to ask Ruger to ship my cylinder to him and the rest of my gun back to me. For the price, I am planning to have mine done by the experienced guy who has done hundreds of them.

    My factory proof load was fired April of 2009.
    200945cyl.JPG

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    Default before you send it back...

    First of all - you got an older gun with the old style extractor! I see on the web that Redhawks are now showing up with dates of March 2012. I'm guessing you bought it as a new gun for the price you paid for it but it is quite odd that a high demand gun sat around for several years without being sold. I guess as long as Ruger honors the warranty it really doesn't matter however.

    Check the gun out very carefully before you send it back and detail any defect you find in the letter you send back with it. Check the barrel- cylinder gap on both side, the barrel crown and forcing cone /throat, chambers etc. and note any roughness in the action etc. May as well get Ruger to go through it completely and fix everything at once. If you aren't familar with all the things you need to check for take it to a gunsmith or someone familar with revolvers and have them take a look.

    I'm still looking for one with the barrel screwed in straight for my .454 conversion. I've got to order some reamers and send my cylinders off to my gunsmith buddy to have them rechambered to a tighter .45 dimensions so I'll be ready when I get one. Until then I'll keep shooting my .44 and .500 - I'll put a 100 or so full power loads thru my .500 this weekend and a few number of lighter loads. Never too late to get ready for summer!


    Quote Originally Posted by swmn View Post
    Ok, it is going back to Ruger. Drat. I am up to 200 live rounds and 2,000 dryfires. Functions flawlessly dry firing, has never yet let a string of 6 go double action. Always with the sticking and stopping. Tonight at the range I realized I was not expecting the gun to fire as I pulled the trigger, I was expecting it to lock up. Not good. So I am sending it out and firing lots of working double action in my other revolvers to get my muscle memory back before I develop any really bad habits.

    I have been reading up as I go, and I am not a gunsmith. I _think_ the problem is the pawl/ ratchet interface. I can buy a new pawl from Midway for about eight dollars and install it myself, but for a professional job I would have to work over the working faces of the ratchet with a file, I think equalized or normalized is the gunsmithing term. Might be that working over the existing ratchet will solve the problem.

    If I send it to Ruger, it will be a free repair and my gun will still be in warranty. If I take it to a local smith it won't be free and it goes downhill from there.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  19. #19
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Easy to see the bad spots.I would not file but a good smooth stone might just be the fix in just a few strokes.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  20. #20
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    Good to hear you like your RH. Too bad it's got a glitch. Ruger can have UPS pick it up. Don't let them charge you anything.

    I sent my 45 Colt cylinder to Cylindersmith along with two other from another guy here in town. He did a good job at a fair price I thought. A year or so later I did my SBH 45 Colt myself and cut the forcing cones to 11degrees on both guns. Reaming the throats to .4525 brought the groups in the RH from 3-4 inchs to being able to shoot the occasional cloverleaf at 25yds with a wrist rest. It makes a HUGE difference. I can do the same at 50-100yds with the scoped SBH. The 454 cylinder didn't need it. Both guns are capable of very tight groups now.

    It's very rewarding to load your own ammo and get great results. Consistency is key. Same length brass and a consistent crimp, properly sized boolits and throats. And finding the right boolit/load for the gun. The Lee 255gr RNFP are very accurate in my guns with Unique. I had (and sold) a mold that dropped 275gr but it had a small hairline crimpgroove and I could never get as good of accuracy with that boolit as with a couple others. I think the crimp groove and nose profile had something to do with it but I'd guess more an issue of inconsistent crimp. When you are crimping 50rnds at a time one after the other you can tell by the feel how consistent things are.

    Here's the one that wasn't as accurate. I loaded it from slow 45 Colt up to hot 454 loads and in 3 different guns it just never gave as good of accuracy as the rnfp 255er.



    This is the one that is very accurate that you have some of. Sounds like they are a little heavy for the shooting you want to do but notice the difference in the crimp groove. I can get a MUCH more consistent crimp with this boolit. Check the 230's your looking at and see what they look like. I prefer the beveled crimp instead of the groove like the one above. I also prefer crimping in a separate step. I use a Lee Factory Crimp die. Works good for me.

    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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