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Thread: River Bottom Feeders

  1. #1
    Member cube01's Avatar
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    Default River Bottom Feeders

    Last summer I saw a fish caught (foul hooked) on the Talkeetna river that looked like some type of bottom feeder... Does anyone have any information on that type of fish?
    Just curious about it..
    "If our father had his say, nobody who did not know how to catch a fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him." -A River Runs Through It

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default whitefish....

    Possibly a whitefish?
    Look similar to a sucker but more sleek, silver in color?
    BK

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Maybe a Burbot?

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    Member cube01's Avatar
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    Ah, yep, it was definately a Burbot...
    What kind of distribution do they have up here? Are they migratory like our trout?
    "If our father had his say, nobody who did not know how to catch a fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him." -A River Runs Through It

  5. #5
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    They are migratory like rainbows and grayling. Many telemetry studies have been done, this is a snip of just one of them. In other studies that I've read they had burbot move from talkeetna down to the Deshka to spawn.

    Burbot movements in the Susitna River occur primarily before and aftertheir spawning period in late January. Data collected during threeyears (1981-83) of monitoring 20 radio tagged fish show that movementpresumably influenced by spawning, begins in September and lasts untilMarch (ADF&G 1983b; 1983e). While most of the radio tagged burbot movedlittle during the spawning period, some have moved over ten miles withone moving 113.6 miles in 1982-83. This fall movement has been discussedpreviously in the 1982-83 winter report and fish tagged in 1983show similar behavior (ADF&G 1983e). Although most movement informationfor burbot to date has been from fish radio tagged during the fall, onefish was monitored throughout the summer in 1983. This burbot (610-3.0)moved only 3.6 miles from its tagging site between July 19 to October 21(Figure 6). Since this burbot (610-3.0) did not move with the correspondingadult salmon runs like the 1983 radio tagged rainbow trout, itappears that there is an adequate food supply for burbot in the mainstemSusitna during the summer.During 1982 and 1983, electrofishing crews captured few burbot nearspawning salmon compared to other resident fish species. Althoughnecropsied burbot have been found with salmon eggs in their stomachs,Morrow (1980) states that burbot are an omnivorous carnivore with astrong preference for fish.A burbot population estimate study conducted in a one mile reach of themainstem estimated a population of 15 burbot. Because no recaptureswere made, the confidence in this value is very limited. Although theremoval method used in the estimate is quite robust, the low probability
    DRAFT/PAGE 11.1 2/22/84, 2/28/84, 3/4
    &22/84,4/2 &18/84, 4/29/84, 5/4/84, 5/10/84SER3F/Part 5 - Discussionof recapture makes the methodology somewhat suspect. A very high trapavoidance appears to be a characteristic of this species. This aspectof burbot behavior also limits the value of interpreting our annual tagrecoveries with respect to population estimates of the entire reach.The very small percentage of tags deployed that were recovered suggesteither hi gh avoi dance to recapture, hi gh mortality of taggi ng, or veryhigh populations. Monitoring changes in population by catch per uniteffort appear to be the most re1 iab1e for long term study of thisspecies.Catch data from 1981-83 shows few adult burbot captured in the SusitnaRiver above the Chulitna River confluence compared to below the confluence(ADF&G 1981c, 1983b). In addition, relatively few juvenile burbothave been captured in the reach above the Chu1 itna River confluence.This leads us to believe that few burbot spawn in the Susitna Riverbetween the Chulitna River confluence and Devil Canyon. During intensivesampling by Juvenile AnadromolJs Habitat Studies (JAHS) in 1983 at35 sites above the confluence, only 18 juvenile burbot were captured bybeach seining or by backpack e1ectroshocking. Catch data from thedownstream migrant traps at RM 103.0 in 1982 (70 juvenile burbot) and1983 (22 juvenile burbot) also supports the hypothesis that littlespawning occurs above the confluence.
    The exact spawning locations and numbers of burbot spawners in the reach
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  6. #6
    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    This is an old report, so some of the verbage did not copy and paste correctly.Another snip from a different report on the Big Sue.

    All ten burbot exhibited an upstream movement between .4 miles and 30.2 miles and a downstream movement of 39.8 miles after ascending the Deshka River.

    Five radio tagged burbot spent lTlJch of the winter in the Oeshka River.Three of these fish (659-1.0, 669-1.8, 760-1.9) Illigrated to the upperreaches of the Oeshka River and two
    ~~re found at TRH 0.7 of Moose Creekon February 5. t'Ioose Creek flows into the Oeshka River at TRH 29.5.Two other radio tagged burbot (650-3.0 and 739-1.0) spent lTlJch of thewinter near TRH 2.0 of the Oeshka River. Burbet 659-1.0 moved to theupper reaches of the Oeshka River after spending 1.5 months at TRH 2.0.Movement dilta were also collected on five radio tagged burbot whichremained in the mainstem durin9 the winter of 19B4-B5 (Figure 6).Genenlly one fish (649-1.0) moved upriver. another (749-0.7) remainedrelat\vely stationary. and the remainin9 three burbot (610-0.5, 639-3.0.73J-l.0) moved downriver to the lower reaches of the Susitna River (RH's6.6 to 17.0). The first two fish were tagged in the mainstem near theParks Highway (RH 84.0) and the latter three fish were ta9ged in themainstem near the mouth of the Deshka River.From mid-December through February, movement data collected duringground surveys indicated that most (9 of 10) of the radio tagged burbot
    ~re
    alive. Seven of the nine fish moved after ice drilling was doneover them. Surbot 629-3.0 was believed to be dead during a groundsurvey on January 16. Althou9h no movement was detected after icedrilling over the remaining two fish (649-1.0 and 650-3.0). those fish
    were
    believed to be alive because one had recently Q'Oved upstrea;!l ~nd
    the other Q'Oved upstream on a later survey.
    Habitat measurements taken at 14 radio tagged burbot relocations showed
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    out of curiosity, has anyone figured out how to catch burbot consistently on a fly rod? I feel like it should be possible
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member cube01's Avatar
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    Good intel, FishGod... +1.


    Monkey,
    They are predatory, arent'y they? I'd think it'd be possible as well...
    "If our father had his say, nobody who did not know how to catch a fish would be allowed to disgrace a fish by catching him." -A River Runs Through It

  9. #9
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    i think catching them on a fly rod isn't a problem so much as finding them.

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    I caught one last year on the Chulitna with a bead- I thought it was a whitefish.

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