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Thread: Anyone use Wolff Trigger springs in a Ruger 77 Mark II?

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    Member gutpile's Avatar
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    Default Anyone use Wolff Trigger springs in a Ruger 77 Mark II?

    My quest for accuracy has me looking at the trigger pull on my 77RL Mark II...looked at all the $120 aftermarket trigger options...happened to run across Wolff Gunsprings http://www.gunsprings.com/Rifles%20%...2/mID52/dID226

    They claim the reduced power triger spring reduces pull by 20%...that gets my current 5-1/2 pound pull down to 4-3/8 pounds for 10 bucks. Anyone have any experience with these folks?

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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Wolff springs are always top quality units for sure. What you may find when only switching to a lighter spring without any other work is that any creep in the trigger will be more pronounced. I guess the best way to describe it might be to say that with the heavier spring you have to pull hard enough to break the sear all at once.

    The 77MKII trigger is one of my favorite systems, and they can be cleaned up really nice without going to an aftermarket trigger. Simple design, solid and bombproof.

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    Member gutpile's Avatar
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    Thanks for the thoughts Kid. I installed the Wolff spring tonight...a little better at 4-1/2 pounds. I'd really like 3 but for a few bucks I can't complain. Hey I bought the "tune-up kit" that includes the 24 pound firing pin spring...any trick to replacing it? Looks like I may need a special tool.

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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Take the bolt out of the rifle, clamp the bottom of the cocking piece in a padded benchvise. Push the bolt body forward until you see the 3/32" hole at the bottom of the cocking piece, stick a drillbit or punch through that hole to capture the firingpin spring. Now unscrew the firingpin assembly from the bolt body. Clamp the end of the firing pin in the vise vertically, take care that you never put any lateral pressure on the unit whilst the firing pin is clamped in the vise, firing pins always work better straight. Push straight down on the bolt shroud until you see the pin that holds the cocking piece on the firing pin, the pin can normally just be pushed out using a 3/32" punch. If the pin won't come out you are going to need a bolt disassembly tool. If it does come out slide the shroud off, put your spring on and reassemble in reverse.
    Good luck and if you don't feel comfortable with any part of the operation stop and take it to a gunsmith.

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