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Thread: neighbors boat

  1. #1
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    Default neighbors boat

    So my neighbor has decided to look for a new boat and me being a good neighbor I have decided to help him spend his money..lol
    He is looking at something in the 20'-24' range.He wants to be able to run salt as well as some rivers for fishing and hunting. He did look at a kingfisher(22' I think) and seemed to like it. My question if in this situation what would you buy and/or what did you buy and are you happy. side note.. he wants to stick with outboard and just get a jet unit as well as prop..
    thanks

  2. #2
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    I think you should get him something that won't "quite" suit his needs... then you swoop in a year or two later and pick it up for a nickel....

    I am a bad neighbor I guess? Sue me.

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    **** I never thought of that, thats priceless info......LOL I could learn to be a bad neighbor for new boat....

  4. #4
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    What's his budget? 20-24' can run the gamut of open 20' skiff for ~$20k to a 24' cabin cruiser at $60k+.

    As we've discussed before on the forum, trying a get a do it all salt and river boat usually results in something that doesn't excel at either task. Also if you pick a boat more geared to the salt, likely the worse that happens is getting stuck on a sandbar on a river. Pick a river boat and worst that happens in the salt is it gets swamped, maybe sunk. It really is best to figure out where he really wants to run the boat most, and pick something best suited for that task.

    How many people will be fishing on the boat, how many sleeping, and how long are the trips projected to be, i.e. how many miles and how many nights out. Just guys, or wife/girlfriend too. Running out of Whittier, Seward, and Homer?
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    What's his budget? 20-24' can run the gamut of open 20' skiff for ~$20k to a 24' cabin cruiser at $60k+.

    As we've discussed before on the forum, trying a get a do it all salt and river boat usually results in something that doesn't excel at either task. Also if you pick a boat more geared to the salt, likely the worse that happens is getting stuck on a sandbar on a river. Pick a river boat and worst that happens in the salt is it gets swamped, maybe sunk. It really is best to figure out where he really wants to run the boat most, and pick something best suited for that task.

    How many people will be fishing on the boat, how many sleeping, and how long are the trips projected to be, i.e. how many miles and how many nights out. Just guys, or wife/girlfriend too. Running out of Whittier, Seward, and Homer?
    Paul really good points on the river/salt and I agree which is kind of why I was looking for some opinions.I have guided in both river and salt boats for a lot of years but have had very little experience with the in between boats so I honestly dont know whats out there other then what I see passing by.From talking with him it seems to me he would want more of a salt boat with small cabin but room to fish.Hunting wise I would think beachable..Probably not so much for sleeping.Mainly few friends some family on day fishing trips/whitter sight seeing/hunting. I am not sure on his upper end budget but I assume it would be in the 50K since he was looking at a kingfisher and I thought it was somewhere in the 50s

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bear View Post
    So my neighbor has decided to look for a new boat and me being a good neighbor I have decided to help him spend his money..lol
    He is looking at something in the 20'-24' range.He wants to be able to run salt as well as some rivers for fishing and hunting. He did look at a kingfisher(22' I think) and seemed to like it. My question if in this situation what would you buy and/or what did you buy and are you happy. side note.. he wants to stick with outboard and just get a jet unit as well as prop..
    thanks
    Bear, although not available with an outboard, I'd suggest looking at the North River Seahawk Inboard. It has the same 18 degree deadrise as the standard Seahawk but utilizes the Hamilton Jet and runs just as shallow on step as a Commander but needs more water to get on step. Definitely not a skinny water boat but works great in the bigger rivers and ocean. PM me if you'd like to talk to someone who's currently using one.

  7. #7
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    hewescraft makes some pretty versatile boats as well as northriver, weldcraft, duckworth, woolridge, boulton. Thunderjet seems more geared to the rivers, but they get used in the salt as well. Just going to have to look at all of them and go with your gut feeling.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Not sure what they are running price wise but I'd look at the Hewescraft Pacific Cruiser 220 or 240 with a 225 or 250 horse Suzuki or Yamaha on the transom. Aluminum is the way to go for a beachable boat, though a small inflatable on top of the cabin is adviseable. I think this is the perfect size of boat and layout for what he's looking to do. I don't like the open bow of the Hewescraft Alaskan, which is why I recomend the cruiser. A cuddy is a great place for stashing gear or taking a quick nap. Also look on the used market in the Pacific North West. If he finds the right deal he can save a bundle over a new boat, even after paying to ship it up. He is also almost guranteed to be able to sell it for what he paid for it a few years down the line if he decides to upgrade or boat ownership just isn't for him.

    While a hard cabin may seam like more of a nicety than an essential, it really increases the length of the season you can enjoyably use the boat. Getting out of the wind and drizzle is well worth it. Many days you'll be out fishing, your hands get numb, then you step in the cabin to warm up or head to another spot. By the time you get there you are ready to go again.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  9. #9
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    No no no... You've got it all wrong!!!

    Convince your neighbor he needs two boats. A $15,000 fiberglass ocean boat like a gently used Bayliner Trophy (there are some out there with a prop, AND a new Aluminum 18' outboard tiller jet skiff package. All in for $30-$35K.

    Sobie2

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