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Thread: What are everyone's thoughts on joining ANG orUSCG to help fund lessons/gain air time

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    Default What are everyone's thoughts on joining ANG orUSCG to help fund lessons/gain air time

    I have been thinking about joining the Air National Guard, or the Coast Guard, to help fund my flying lessons. Now, this part is pretty straight forward, but I'm curious if anyone else has done the same.

    What I'm really wondering, is even if you aren't a pilot in either organization, are there still opportunities to get any flying time? Are you ever allowed to take smaller planes out for fun? I'm thinking not, but it's worth dreaming....I need to find a way to get my hours up, and my commercial paid for!

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    For what you want the Alaska Civil Air Patrol sounds better. They assist with search and rescue and do some scouting for fires in the summer and you dont have the military BS to deal with since if you are not prior service you would have to attend some sort of basic training.

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    That looks great! Will they help fund your lessons, or is it more just free flying time? Can I join and get flight time with super low hours?

    I'm not especially thrilled with joining the military, so suggestions like this are really appreciated!

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    Member Bsj425's Avatar
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    I dont know the specifics of it all I know is my neighbor flys for them and they fly all the time winter and summer.

    http://www.akwg.cap.gov/

    there is their website where you can find contact info for specifics for your questions.

    Edit: after looking at their site it appears it hasnt been updated in quite some time so you may be better off just calling.

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    Chapter 30 is supposedly a smokin deal these days. Once enrolled you get a monthly cut for education and cost of living. Not a bad gig if you use it for the right reasons.

    Intel on Aero Club.

    http://www.elmendorfaeroclub.com/financial_aide.html
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    If you want to go the CAP route, send John Brown an email at cobrashot@acsalaska.net
    He's with the Arcturus CAP squadron.

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    Cadets, the younger members of the CAP, can actually obtain their private via the CAP. Although it depends on the squadron.
    I have been a CAP member since 1974 and I am still amazed at how some things never manage to get done. There is a lot of the good-ole-boy B.S. and folks who think it is their private flying club.

    Being active duty military or a reservist does get you access to the flying clubs on base. But you still have to pay. And joining up to enter a flying program is not really a sealed deal either. Although it does help if you already have at least a private license and of course a college degree. If you do not have a degree yet, joining as an enlisted flight crew is the best way to go. (Flight Engineer, door gunner, etceteros.) do a few years of that and use the GI bill to finish your degree, meanwhile use the base flying club to rack up hours. The flight crew folks tend to be treated much better than the grunts.
    Over a 30 year period of time I was in the Navy, Army, Army Guard and Air Guard. I can't remember any of them giving me the straight and true story in regards to assignments and education choices. So buyer beware.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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    I was in the Alaska ANG (Anchorage) in the 80's. I was too tall to get into flight training, since one had to go to regular Air Force flight training and fly T-37's and T-38's in order to come back and fly C-130's, the ejection seats dictated the seating height and leg length limitations. I think they've changed the training program for transport pilots since then so the height limitations could have changed, but a little too late to help me.

    The Guard did end up being quite helpful for my flight training despite the disappointment over being ineligible for military training. At the time the Guard paid for half of both flight training (after the Private) and college tuition. I did use the aero clubs some (Ft. Rich and Ft. Wainright) I know the Wainright club is gone and not sure about the Ft. Rich one.

    I did my Comm, Inst. and Multi at Merrill field, however, since it was much more convenient location wise for me. I was living in College Village at the time and had only a bicycle and feet for transportation. All I had to do was save the receipts for the flight time and take them to the personell office at Kulis and they'd issue a check for half the amount, no questions asked.

    I worked flight time maintenance and my experience after a hitch qualified me for the required experience for the A&P ticket.

    All that being said, I have a feeling today's Guard may be quite different than the Guard in the 80's. I don't know about the benefits, for all I know they could be better. I can't imagine it being as much fun, however since they moved over to Elmendorf. They probably resemble the regular Air Force more than they did when they were at Kulis. If you're interested, however I'd certainly recommend you check it out....Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    I don't normally answer questions like this; military service is a very personal decision in my view, but I, or many I know, have attempted what you are contemplating, and I do not know of any one person to really make it work out for their benefit. I worked in civil aviation for 15 years and I was in the Air National Guard for four (Army Guard for two before that), so aviation is in my blood (whether I like it or not lol)

    First of all, GI Bill does not cover your Private License training. (or at least it didn't for anyone I know.) Once you get past the Private/IFR/Twin ratings, and begin training for your Commercial Pilot Check ride, THEN the GI Bill will kick in. As far as I know, that applies to Chapter 30, Chapter 106, and VEAP. Incidentally, if you go in the National Guard, you will be in the Chapter 106 program, which is less profitable than the Chapter 30 that the Active Duty guys get. (For obvious reasons.)

    This idea that you can join the military (enlist) and become a pilot is a misnomer (at best) that recruiters like to spread around. All pilots in the modern military are officers with college degrees and either ROTC or OCS (Officer Candidate School) That apples to both the Guard/Reserve as well as Active Duty. The U.S. hasn't had flying enlisted men since World War I.

    The Air National Guard does have some sort of program that allows enlisted men with a college degree AND a Private License rating to apply for OCS and flight school. Just because you get into OCS, doesn't mean you can get into Flight School. I know several guys in my squadron (two in my shop) who fit all of the requirements and even tried to kiss up to the wig commander, but never got in. One had a BA in Professional Aeronautics and was flying commercially in a charter operation, the other had a BA in Aeronautical Engineering, both graduated from Embry Riddle. NEITHER of them ever got accepted into OCS and neither ever got to fly in the Air Force. One put in 4 years and one put in 8. They finally gave up and left the military. There are others who had the same ideas and met similar fates.

    The Active Duty Air Force used to have a program with United Airlines that UA promised to hire any Air Force pilot who enrolled in the program and served at least six years. (I don't know if that is still around or not.) The trick was, you had to go through Air Force ROTC and get selected for the pilot program per the regular channels. That's a small percentage of ROTC cadets nationally.

    Another thing that you should think about is when do you plan to use all of these great educational benefits? The Guard/Reserve isn't the stay at home force it once was. I gave up three semesters in four years due to deployments that pulled me out of school just long enough to force me to withdraw from courses or apply for I grades. My experience was typical of most of the guys I knew.

    If you want to join the military for education money, you're not alone. I recall my first day of basic training, and the drill sergeant went around to ever soldier in the platoon asking "Why did you join?" All but two said "for the college money." However, you should be aware that the military doesn't have the market cornered on college money.

    I'm an educator these days, so I hate to shoot down a young person's dreams, but I also hate to see a young person hornswaggled by some unscrupulous recruiter, too. If you're sole purpose of joining the military is to get your FAA Commercial Ticket, you will probably be spinning your wheels. While it IS possible, the odds aren't in your favor. (It's like every other"opportunity in America. There has to be a few successes to prove it's "possible" or else people would stop believing.) Every young man who signs up wanting to be a pilot can't be a pilot; there would be no one to fix the planes, do the paperwork, or cook the meals.

    In my view, and in my own observations, you would be better served to find another route to your goals, and there are many alternatives to military service for flight training that are probably more certain than military service. Most of the commercial pilots I know, and that's a lot, started out as flight instructors where they traded work time for flight time in a larger plane, until they got enough twin engine PIC time to get hired by a regional. (Which isn't much, btw, sometimes less than 1000 hrs) They get hired by some place like Era Aviation/Penn Air or one of God knows how many regional carriers out there, and then they fly all of the hours they can and build time until they have enough to get on at a major airline. That's the most common route.

    Good luck to you, young man. Your dreams ARE worth dreaming. Just be smart about how you pursue them.

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    Oh my God. I apologize to the group for the length of that post. I had did not realize, until it posted, how long it was. I'm sorry.

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    I made and ate a grilled cheese and onion sandwich while reading it....using a frying pan.....
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    Oh my God. I apologize to the group for the length of that post. I had did not realize, until it posted, how long it was. I'm sorry.
    Very infomative post, FL2AK-Old Town. I can tell you,, though, that I was able to use my GI Bill for basic flight training leading to my private license. That was back in 1955 - 1956 however, and the regs might have changed since then. Uncle Sam paid 75% of my flying costs, but didn't get me to the Commercial Certificate.

    Again - - - good post !!!

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    I'm not familiar with the pre-VEAP GI Bill, but something even the casual observer has noticed is the continual and gradual declining of military benefits regardless of which political party is in power in Washington. My dad was in the Army a few years before you, and his benefits were drastically different than mine, and mine were drastically different than guys who got out even a few years ago.

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    CAP does train cadets for there Private Licence, but it's not free, they have to pay for gas. All instruction is free. As an adult member you can't work toward your private, but if you already have a private, after a years membership you can work toward an instrument or commercial lic. We are the Civilian Auxiliary to the USAF so are quasi military. You can fly cheaply for a reasonable fee for maintenance plus fuel. and the Air Force does fund us for Search and Rescue training so all it cost is your time. We currently operate. C-172, 182, 185, 206, GA-8 and DHC2 Beaver aircraft, Floats wheels and skis. We have 3 squadrons in the Anchorage area Polaris Sq. at Merrill Field, Birchwood Sq, and Arcturus Sq. at Elmendorf. There are also Squadrons in Kenai, Homer, Seward, Juneau, Sitka, Haines,, King Salmon, Bethel, Nome, Galena, Eilson, and Fairbanks. The Polaris Sq. meets every Tuesday at 7:00 PM, the web site is anchoragecap.org. and by the way with membership in CAP you're eligible to join the Aero Club on Elmendorf.
    Mel

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    Quote Originally Posted by FL2AK-Old Town View Post
    I'm not familiar with the pre-VEAP GI Bill, but something even the casual observer has noticed is the continual and gradual declining of military benefits regardless of which political party is in power in Washington. My dad was in the Army a few years before you, and his benefits were drastically different than mine, and mine were drastically different than guys who got out even a few years ago.
    Sorry testmonial, but true. Uncle Sam continues to cut the benefits of those who held up their right hands in defense of this country.

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