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Thread: Baiting barrels plastic or metal

  1. #1

    Default Baiting barrels plastic or metal

    I have never baited bears before I was wanting some input on the best kind of container to put the bait in? I was thinking about 55 gal steal drum or plastic. If any one else as other ideas that would help a million. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Mark
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    I stopped using barrels. I got tired of lugging them around.

    I set up a couple of logs and use spruce branches to keep the bait out of direct rain and call it good.

  3. #3
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Default barrel bits

    +1 Metal barrel. Those bears are total slobs and destroyers and after one season of plastic chunks and garbage all over the woods it will convert you lickety split.
    Mark's thoughts of 'no barrel' are good, just make sure the bears DO come or you'll be cleaning up a (presumably) greasy mess off of the ground per the regs.

    Frank

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Bears like to chew on plastic barrels especially those filled with desil, that probably doesn't matter too much for baiting, might help though.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  5. #5
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Metal barrel is the way to go, plastic they will tear and chew it up like its some sort of chew toy or something. I use ratcheting straps and ratchet them right to a tree, then put some duct tape around the opening where they have access to the food and you can see if its griz or blackies been hittin' it. or maybe set up stealth cam....hmmm, have to check if thats legal, I'm not sure....K

  6. #6

    Default Tried Different Bait Techniques

    I've used different barrels and techniques over the years and haven't yet found one that's easy. A steel barrel (55 gal. or smaller) seems to last longer BUT are heavy. I've used plastic and found that the ones that salad dressing is shipped in (50 gal.) are heavier and seem to hold up IF you suspend the barrel on a cable (between two trees) so that it swings (and moves) if the bear tries to bite it. I also use three or four, 5 gallon buckets suspended on a cable/rope strung between two trees. Covers on the buckets keeps rain & birds out. All that being said, steel lasts best.

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Hasn't mattered

    It hasn't mattered. As long as browns are around either works. I have switched to the smaller plastic - 30-35 gallon ones. They hold 50 pounds of dog food so there is no need for a 55 and all the extra space. They also weigh a lot less and are easier to transport. Chewing has not been a problem.

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  8. #8
    Member crossfoxAK's Avatar
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    Default barrels

    I have found that the 30 gallon steel barrels work good with the top cut out half way, less bulk to haul around. I have made cribs out of trees and braches before but they tend to always get destroyed and then it is more work trying to put it back together when you get back to the stand.

  9. #9
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    +1 Metal barrel. Those bears are total slobs and destroyers and after one season of plastic chunks and garbage all over the woods it will convert you lickety split.
    I agree. In fact, the bears will eat the plastic barrels. I've even had them eat my permit and warning signs off of the trees because I handled them after handling bait or scent.

    Even steel barrels need to be chained to trees, or they'll simply take them away.........

    Mark's thoughts of 'no barrel' are good, just make sure the bears DO come or you'll be cleaning up a (presumably) greasy mess off of the ground per the regs.
    I don't use grease, meats, or other such bait. I went totally to dog food with maple syrup poured over it.

    Before the baiting season is over everything is gone, courteousy of the guests. They even dig up the soil underneath for me and eat my permits and warning signs.

  10. #10
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default Barrels

    I'm not a baiter, taking my first class with a buddy this month, but if you fellas need barrels, there's a guy in Wasilla that has all sort of barrels. He's called America's Park and Sell. (North on Parks, East on Palmer-Wasilla Hwy, first right past the light.

    He has metal 55 gallon barrels w/locking lids for $25, $30 for ones that are set up to store human food in, and I believe $30 for plastic 55 gallon drums. He has 30 gallon metal and plastic barrels too. Guy said a lot of baiters buy up his metal barrels this time of year.

    Unitec of Ak has 30&55 gallon plastic barrels, they're $85 each.

    Tim

  11. #11
    New member fishingis4play's Avatar
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    Default Downed Trees work

    Been using downed trees to put the bait under the edge and then back fill the back side so they come to the side you want them on. All you have to do is throw some branches over it to keep the rain and birds out and it's easy to see from a distance if it's being hit by bears. Nothing to pack in or out after season ends. Found here on the Kenai peninsula that a brown bear can smash a 30 or a 55 gallon metal barrel with little effort and can even tear the barrels off of the chains. Were lucky there are only 250 brown bears on the peninsula cause that only means we each only get 1 or 2 on our bait!(sarcasm!!!) Good luck and happy hunting!

  12. #12

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    I second the 30-35 gallon metal barrel. Makes it a lot easier on the back when you lug in 50+ lbs of dog food to put in the thing.
    Matt

  13. #13
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Default We just picked up two plastic 30 gallon barrels

    from the car wash on Dimond just west of Arctic. Clean and ready to go, just gotta find a employee. $20 a piece. Thick ones and we think they should hold up good. First time trying these though. But will be quiter on my boat hauling them out there and the smaller size is nice. so we got two to have the same capacity.

  14. #14
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    Default Metal barrels

    I have been guiding over twenty years in Maine and I have used all kinds of barrels and buckets over the years. I maintain over 80 bait sites each year. Metal drums are the best. I have had black bears drag off plastic drums (unless they are strapped to trees) never to be found again. I don't know all the regs up there but one of the best baits I have used that is easy to carry and use is deep fryer grease from a restraunt. Heat it up and pour it over an old stump or log and the bears will tear it apart and rip it out of the ground. After they rip apart the log or stump they get grease on theri paws and when they walk off into the forest their trails they leave behind attracts other bears.
    Another thing that works well is onion sacks. Put your bait in an onion sack and hang it up as far as you can reach in a tree. The wind carries the smell around.
    If you take the woods out of the woodsman you have nothing left but a man in the woods.

  15. #15
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    I like a metal one on it's side with a hole cut in it with a little jagged edge but not sharp. This does two things for me. One I can judge the bears size next to the can and two the jagged edge pulls hair and I can see what color of bear is hitting the can.

    When I was in Washington I would have blonde, cinnamon and blacks coming in and that was helpful. I haven't really seen many cinnamons here accept toward the Canadian border.

  16. #16
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    I'll be using a plastic 55 gallon glycol barrel this spring. I'm curious to see how it works.

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