Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: 416 ruger feeding

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southeast Ak
    Posts
    13

    Default 416 ruger feeding

    So I am on my 2nd 416 ruger which was produced in 2011 and am still having trouble with the feeding, especially the first round with a loaded mag which goes too far left and gets caught on the tip of the fat hornady dgx bullet just by a little. going into the chamber, its as if the feed rails arent releasing it soon enough?? I sent my first 416 back to ruger and they "fixed" it but still did the same so I traded it off and now I bought another one and do not really want to send it back to ruger as my experience with my first one didnt change..Now my question is if I took some emery cloth to the feed rails would this help or could I end up ruining it, what grade should I use, also the brass gets scratched horrible...Will just shooting it break it in or what? I love the rifle but want it to feed factory ammo..sorry to be long winded. thanks..Also anyone know of any good gunsmiths that is competent on feeding issues in Alaska???

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    foothills of the Brooks Range
    Posts
    600

    Default

    http://forums.accuratereloading.com/...43/m/843106779

    I've done a few of my rifles but when it is extremely ardous I sent one to Satterlee Arms and another to WWG.....WWG did it in short order, need to tig the left rail for the first round to be timed perfectly, the right just needed a wee bit of massaging.

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southeast Ak
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Grizz106, what do you mean by tig? Were you happy with wwg as I here alot of negative comments about them? What do you think this would cost to have corrected??

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southeast Ak
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Well just called wwg and asked for a price quote and was simply told that they dont quote prices over the phone...So maybe I just send it back to ruger and tell them my story of 2 guns with the same problem

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    foothills of the Brooks Range
    Posts
    600

    Default

    tig is a type of welding....my .30-338 was originally a .30-06 and am certain it feed fine with the parent cart., when I bought the J.CHiggins Model 50 it was rechambered into the .338 necked down.....never did feed right so I sent that to Stuart down in the Dakotas and he performed the rail work perfectly! Figured I'd take the same barreled action and do a .458 WM since the rails were already tuned for that belted round. When all said and done the first round came off of the left rail...it was not lined up concenctrically with the bore and in fact the round had to forced fast enough to feed into chamber off of the right side of the coned breech. Not an ideal bear round at all. Got in touch with "the kid" here on the forums and he was willing to take it on.
    He got this done in short time but to correct the timing he had to tig some metal back on the left foward part of the rail for the big round ie...458. It is now one reliable grizz gun or moose gun. I think I paid him like a 125 bucks for the metal work on the rails.
    I don't personally have the negative regards some here do with them.....having them commissioned yrs ago to work my .45-70 and it was a beaut to say the least and now this .458 along with there park job on it as well.
    I give them 5 out of 5 stars.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    foothills of the Brooks Range
    Posts
    600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldboar View Post
    Well just called wwg and asked for a price quote and was simply told that they dont quote prices over the phone...So maybe I just send it back to ruger and tell them my story of 2 guns with the same problem
    I am not a truster of the same mistake twice by anyone, send it back to Ruger to only have it come back in the same behaviour would suck, my take is just sent it to WWG....you won't go broke on them and you assuredly will have it back in better condition than new, meaning your timing problem would be resolved. I've read owners of said caliber having this issue, a shame really when the round has so much going for it.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southeast Ak
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Grizz, i am curious though about tig on the left rail as the first round is kept under the right rail, how does the left rail have anything to do with the first and last round to be chambered..Sorry maybe I am just not getting this

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    foothills of the Brooks Range
    Posts
    600

    Default

    oldboar, I may have wrote incorrectly in a hurry, had to grab my .458 WM commercial mauser and take a look at how this stacks the rounds.....my first round comes up first off of the right rail perfectly and into the chamber, next, when the left round came up (before it was tig on the left) it would go up the ramp and bash off of the right side of breech. WWG built up the left rail with a dab of weld and worked it down to where the round would be grabbed by the bolt/claw and feed directly into the chamber. some have said to be careful when you massage the rails to get precise feeding as metal don't grow back if you take off too much....but, it can be tigged up and filed to feed.The .338 necked down is essentially a .458 wm brass necked down so when I had the action rebarreld to the .458 the bullet must have been large enough to throw it to the right. Man, hope I ain't confusing you.
    How is your bullets going into the chamber? I think some here have had the same occurance as you, they might speak up.....dunno. I have been buying Mausers for some time and have done one thing or another or many things to them to get what I want. Albeit a full custom or semi or just trigger work, bedding etc. I've only have one Ruger Mk II in the home but not one of these new big bores I read so much about, suppose if I had the itch for one I would commision a smith to build one and have it the way I want it.
    Some new rifles aren't pleasing as your experience thus far has led you to believe.....if for some reason you aren't satisfied with Sturm Ruger cust. service and if you aim to keep the firearm I personally would have one work the quirks out. Biting the bullet sota speak is what you probably have to do.
    Guess you can say I am not pleased with new rifles so much, if I do maybe a Cooper or a Blaser if I want to seriously coin up. What I should have done was just bought a Blaser yrs. ago if I was smart as you can change out barrels/calibers......would have been cheaper.
    WWG will do you good I am sure ......from my experience.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    foothills of the Brooks Range
    Posts
    600

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldboar View Post
    Well just called wwg and asked for a price quote and was simply told that they dont quote prices over the phone...So maybe I just send it back to ruger and tell them my story of 2 guns with the same problem
    my studies have brought to lite that Ruger listens but does nothing about it, know a fella that guides for Brown Bears and too had the same problem as you. others too have just taken it to a skookum smith and have them perform there majic on it. Bout the only thing you can do unless you just sell it to some other schmuck. Think Murphy here may have had the same problem, just goin on some old memory, isn't what it use to be. good luck with the Ruger.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    4,088

    Default

    I sent my Redhawk back to Ruger twice and they still couldn't get the barrel screwed in straight. Nice folks to talk to but I ended up sending it back to them a third time for a refund but then again I'm still waiting on a check!

    I was pleasantly surprised to find that my $400 custom .375/06 AI would feed empty cases without a hitch. Someone got it right as an almost straight sharp shouldered case is not easy one to make feed right. Gives me a real feeling of confidence in the gun - it may become my "go to" rifle as it also appears to shoot quite well.


    Quote Originally Posted by grizz106 View Post
    my studies have brought to lite that Ruger listens but does nothing about it, know a fella that guides for Brown Bears and too had the same problem as you. others too have just taken it to a skookum smith and have them perform there majic on it. Bout the only thing you can do unless you just sell it to some other schmuck. Think Murphy here may have had the same problem, just goin on some old memory, isn't what it use to be. good luck with the Ruger.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southeast Ak
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Well my buddy just loaded 3 dummy rounds with 350barnes tsx, 350speer mag tip and a 350kodiak. Boy did they feed alot better BUT I still think the cartridge needs to release earlier from the feed rails as if you go very slow to chamber a round it still hesitates right as it is going into the chamber then pops out from the rail and lines up. If it would release just a hair earlier it would work great.. Waiting for my pre paid box from ruger( I know the one before that I sent them didnt come back any better but I figure what can it hurt as it doesnt cost anything and if it still doesnt feed then I will send it to someone that can make it feed)I sure love everything about the rifle, if it would only feed!!!

  12. #12
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    A bolt action rifle should be operated swiftly and firmly, with positive motion to the rear, then to the front. Operating one slowly is not how they are intended to be used. That in itself can lead to feed issues. When they check them at the factory, I would doubt that they try to feed the cartridge slowly. Hence the situation where they say it works fine, but the owner has feed issues.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  13. #13
    Member The Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    1,069

    Default

    +1 for what Gunbugs said. It doesn't have to be a bone jarring action, just positive. Aside from that I would bet that polishing the feedramp, which I'm sure was beadblasted and working over the extractor a bit would do worlds of good for you.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Southeast Ak
    Posts
    13

    Default

    What would you use for polishing? emery cloth?

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    sand lake
    Posts
    35

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    A bolt action rifle should be operated swiftly and firmly, with positive motion to the rear, then to the front. Operating one slowly is not how they are intended to be used. That in itself can lead to feed issues. When they check them at the factory, I would doubt that they try to feed the cartridge slowly. Hence the situation where they say it works fine, but the owner has feed issues.
    wwg has corrected 2 of bolt guns to my complete satisfaction, both control round feed (one ruger in 338 win mag and a winchester in 416 rem mag).

    call them, better yet visit them and give them a chance to fix your factory rifle hiccups

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldboar View Post
    What would you use for polishing? emery cloth?
    I used JB bore paste to polish the feed ramps on my 338 RCM. Now it runs slicker that snot on a door knob. All the rugers I have ever had like a little break in period to knock off the rough spots, the bore paste just seemed to expedite the process. A little paste goes a long way, and after a couple hours of working the bolt back and forth you will notice a huge difference.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •